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Discrimination at work

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by HarryType1, Sep 22, 2015.

  1. HarryType1

    HarryType1 Type 1 · Member

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    Hi there. I was recently diagnosed type 1. When admitted to hospital my sugar was 24mmol and keytones above 6 and spent 6 days on a drip. Before my diagnosis I was offered the position of deputy area manager, my training was supposed to commence on the 24th august, I was signed off sick that week commencing but have been back at work for over a month and nothing has been said about my training since and I have the letter in writing offering me the position. Our company nurse also suggested my manager should allocate a room I can test my bloods and inject my insulin as I have been having to do it in the locker room standing up, sat in the canteen then people complain so have been going to sit in my car to do it and just feel a little like I am being pushed out and not supported really. Seriously thinking about handing my notice in on grounds of discrimination since my diagnosis, could I actually do that? Sorry to babble on but I don't know who else to talk to, thanks for reading.
     
  2. Scardoc

    Scardoc · Well-Known Member

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    If I was you I'd go and speak to your immediate manager/HR and ask direct what is happening. There could be a simple explanation but meantime you could be blowing it out of proportion in your own head. You've been ill, diagnosed and are fit to work again so nothing should impact your promotion. Talk to them, if there is any doubt in their minds now you can assure them or realise they may not be the best company to work for.

    As for the nurse.....she's creating a problem. Let people complain, if they don't like it they can always look away as you need to have a good look to see someone injecting!!
     
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  3. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm always amazed when I hear about people complaining about testing and injecting in public places or food areas. What planet are these people living on? It's nothing to do with them. I've seen people doing testing and injecting and I'm like *shrug* what is the actual problem? It's not the diabetic person is shooting up heroin or anything.
     
  4. HarryType1

    HarryType1 Type 1 · Member

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    thanks for the advice, my HR are pretty useless to be honest I'll just be seen as rocking the boat I know I will. I'll give it a try anyway. Thanks
     
  5. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Being Devil's Advocate, they could be giving you a little time to get used to your diagnosis and new regime, before turning up the pressure with your promotion. Stress does have the potential to impact your control - and usually not in a great way!

    I'd go to whoever made the offer, and do it in writing. I might just drop them an email, or a letter (your choice), referring to your offer letter and saying you understand that circumstances intervened, preventing the initially planned start date, and could you please reschedule the training, and see where it goes from there.

    It's usually best to let them either make it better, or put their necks in nooses.

    On a less desireable front, Employers can withdraw offers, if something material comes to light between an offer and the contract being completed (i.e. a start date). How that would look, in relation to your diabetes diagnosis, I don't know, but if that's the route it goes, then your union (if you have one, or are a member) could help, failing that ACAS.

    Good luck with it all.
     
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  6. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Employers do have a duty of care and this article is a Practical Guide to Employer Adjustment for People with Diabetes.

    https://www.ntu.ac.uk/equality_diversity/document_uploads/92577.pdf
     
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  7. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    @Artisticforge Whilst you may like to wallow in a pit of of self-despair (and given your disablities I can understand your point of view), there are many of us who choose not to. We are very open about our diabetes, live very full, active and fun lives and do our best to stave off the issues that can lead to physical disability as a result of our diabetes. There are two views you can take of life:

    1. I am a victim of my conditions.

    2. I am a human with a lot to give who happens to have a couple of conditions.

    I and many others on this forum have elected the second one. We have successful jobs, lives and families. Yes we have Diabetes. Yes, we know we are mortal. No, we don't care. We'd rather live life than sit there and let it waste away.

    I'm sorry if this seems blunt, but you always have a choice. I've been doing this for 27 years and I choose the positive path.
     
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    #7 tim2000s, Sep 22, 2015 at 5:56 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2015
  8. June_C

    June_C Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I am a T1 diabetic, but I am neither broken, damaged or disabled and do not wish to be labelled as such.

    I'm fortunate enough to be fit and well apart from a pancreas that's no longer firing on all cylinders. I, like Tim2000s, have taken a positive approach to this 'condition', made a few changes, accepted all the help, support and medical assistance that's been given and enjoying every moment of what I have left.

    Diabetes doesn't have to be a death sentence if carefully managed. I've succeeded through sheer hard work and discipline in achieving bg levels as good as a non diabetic, so I intend to die of something else.

    Being diabetic is not shameful or anything to be embarrassed about. Because I have this condition, I opted to tell friends and family so that they knew what to do if I became hypo or hyper. Without that knowledge, they could unwittingly leave me to face serious complications. It's a sensible precaution, rather than hiding it thinking it's a disgrace.

    I'm an optimist and my diagnosis was just another challenge put before me and I've had a lot.

    Sadly you seem to be a pessimist. I really hope 'Newbies' are not influenced by your pessimistic outlook. They need help and support to come to terms with the diagnosis which came as a shock to all of us.
     
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  9. mo53

    mo53 Type 2 · Expert

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    @HarryType1 . I agree with a previous poster I think you need an appointment to meet with the person who appointed you to the new post to discuss when the appointment and training will begin. Are you a member of a union? Perhaps they can advise about your rights in work as a diabetic? I hope you manage to resolve your difficulties. Please keep posting as there are many on the site who will want to know and will be concerned how you get on. Good luck :)
     
  10. Emmotha

    Emmotha Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @HarryType1 perhaps they are waiting for u to approach them, maybe they just think u need time to get ur head around it?

    I was diagnosed 3 weeks after starting a new job at a new company and it's never held me back. It's amazing actually how many other type 1s work in my building. You and your colleagues will adjust pretty quick. I just inject at my desk or even in meetings. No different from some one else taking a paracetamol, well except they don't need that to stay alive. I am cautious around needlephobes though.

    Just have a chat with ur new manager and see what's going on :)
     
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  11. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    @Artisticforge

    You really have been through the mill with your accidents and injuries, and I really feel for you, honestly I do. However, none of that is anything to do with diabetes. Your problems do not stem from diabetes, which with the right medication and diet can be controlled. There is no doubt about this. All you need is the right advice (which you can get from this forum) and some effort from yourself. No-one can do it for you.
     
  12. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    @HarryType1 needs advice about his employment.
    Some posts have been deleted and more will follow if this derailing continues.
     
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