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Finally ready to change- help me get started.

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Lilysun, Mar 17, 2021.

  1. Lilysun

    Lilysun · Member

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    Hello everyone,

    I have found it very hard to accept that I have type 2 diabetes, at only 30 years old. I was first diagnosed with gestational diabetes whilst pregnant but nurses told me they suspected I was actually an undiagnosed type 2. For the sake of my baby I kept a strict log of every single thing I ate and lost a lot of weight even whilst pregnant. Problem is that I buried my head in the sand a bit after the birth. I basically ignored it until a random blood glucose test I did the other day showed it was at 17! Which was a real shock to the system. I am now using a freestyle libre link device and it shows my blood sugar as always being much higher than I would like (usually between 10-13), sometimes lower sometimes higher.
    Doctors seemed keen to push me onto medication but I really want to try and manage this without drugs if possible.I decided to try and lose weight first of all as that would naturally help my blood sugars stay more in control. My issue is that I am trying to lose weight, trying not to spike blood sugars and also still breastfeeding. It’s difficult for me to go too low on calories. I’m also greatly stressed which doesn’t help. Today, my blood sugar hit a high of 15 and it made me think that I should just get medication for now and wean myself off afterwards. But I really don’t like the NHS’s approach to managing type 2 and their push towards drugs. I wanted some advice - given the high readings should I go ahead and take medication for now, or should I persevere and try to control naturally? The graphs on my freestyle libre app show that it takes me around 3 hours or more for blood sugars to come down to 10 or below. I’m doing my best to live a more healthy life but can’t help feeling confused about how to go about this.
     
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  2. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Moderator
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    Hello and welcome,

    First of all congratulations on your new baby. You are no doubt feeling exhausted as well as stressed and upset about the diagnosis.

    Well done on starting the keeping a record of your levels. This can make it easier to keep feeling incentivised.

    The good news is that myself and many others have put our levels well into the normal range by going low carb not low calorie and never feeling hungry.

    Stick around and read around- this is a great place to find in formation, advice and support.

    Good luck and welcome.
     
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  3. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Taking drugs or not is your choice. Many of us have reduced our blood levels and weight by taking on a reduced carb diet. Personally I was on drugs for > 10 years and low carb/exercise did reduce my levels to the point I could come off. Others on the forums also did wean off drugs over time too, so that can happen

    However... Breastfeeding currently is something that may change this, so as I have never been in that situation I don't know what potential impact it might have. Hopefully someone more knowledgeable can come and discuss here. I wanted to flag this as it's important to think about the whole picture

    A quick Google and seems breastfeeding potentially means you are reducing carbs in a way already, 50g average per feeding https://www.sth.nhs.uk/clientfiles/File/pd3058_BreastFeedingMothersWithDiabetes[1].pdf

    So, as I said, it would be sensible to get more advice than low carb and hopefully other mother's may be able to help here

    What are the types of food you currently eat in a day? Did your nurse give any advice at all?
     
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    #3 Andydragon, Mar 17, 2021 at 6:44 AM
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2021
  4. Andy_Warlow

    Andy_Warlow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi congratulations on the new born.

    Well first of all, it is good to hear you want to take control of your diabetes.

    So me personally, I have never taking diabetic medication and got my blood sugars down and a normal Hbac1 in 10 weeks it can be done.

    Here is what my plan was that worked for me. Bare in mind it may not work for you, other factors may come into play.

    • Take it each day at a time, you'll get good and bad days. If you have a bad day forget about and start again. You'll soon get more good days than bad days.
    • Look into a low carb diet.
    • Exercise especially resistant training.
    • Look at your Freestyle libre, what do you eat when Blood sugar goes up. Make a food diary. So if you eat a sandwich and you blood sugar goes up. Maybe stop bread and see what happens.
    • Once you get you blood glucose under control allow for cheat meals, As this will help you stay on the wagon.
    • Carb alternatives like cauliflower rice, Naked noddles are great for padding out a meal.
    • Read Jason Fungs the diabetic code book
    • Look into intermitting Fasting
    • Watch a youtube channel called Beat diabetes lots of great interviews, with people who have done really well at controlling there blood sugars. Also Dennis the host gives great tips on lowering your blood sugars.
    I hope this doesn't over whelm you and good luck.
     
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  5. Lilysun

    Lilysun · Member

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    Thank you all so much for your advice and encouragement. Today I followed the advice a few of you put to me on low carb, I’ve also started reading Dr Jason Fung’s book the diabetes code. My blood sugars have been the lowest today than they have for a long time...just did a reading now and it was 7.7 two hours after eating.
    My question is - do I have to be so strict forever? I was very controlled today and understand that il have to do this for a good while but is there ever a point where people have found their tolerance to certain foods improves? So right now I can’t tolerate bread at all but if I keep eating healthily is there a time in the future where I may be able to enjoy it again?
     
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  6. New Haven Neil

    New Haven Neil Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi! I succeeded with low carbing, although I wasn't as high as you are. Cutting out bread, rice and pasta (as well as the sugary stuff - biscuits and cakes!) makes a hell of a difference, and there are plenty of alternatives. You can eat a lot of protein, meats, eggs etc, which hopefully will be OK for you whilst breast feeding but obviously I can't express a personal opinion on that! Maybe take advice form someone medically qualified on that, but so many medics and nurses just don't understand low carbing, as the NHS is blind to it.

    Dr Jason Fung's book is a great help which helps us understand our illness, and that it isn't our fault we are ill.

    Try not to get too upset, it takes time, but you can achieve great improvement without drugs.

    Good luck on your journey, we're here to support and help- we've all been through it!
     
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  7. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Lilysun, try not to think about the future, just concentrate on today and the best you can today to get your sugars down.
    Over time your appetite and tastes may well change and what you yearn for now may not be on your wish list in the future

    I remember being scared at the "you can't eat" list but now just a year later I really don't crave cake, or milk chocolate, and i never ever thought I'd hear myself saying that!!!
     
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  8. New Haven Neil

    New Haven Neil Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Oh yes, taste changes without a doubt. I now eat Lindt 90% chocolate (only 2 squares at a time!) which I couldn't have even looked at before, never mind eaten. Many other changes too, for the better. I have even got used to coffee without sugar, in fact I sipped one by mistake yesterday with a spoon of sugar in and it was horrid!

    You can do this, just take your time, and...test test test!
     
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  9. DCB 2

    DCB 2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Yes testing for blood sugar is important. When I was stuck in my apartment with no power and heat. The testing was the only thing I could do to managed things. I could not cook so I ate things I normally would not eat. The testing allowed me to take action when the numbers started to creep up.
     
  10. Andy_Warlow

    Andy_Warlow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    This is very individual, some people have been known to get there tolerance for foods back.
    Some people lose weight and then they lose the fat of the liver and pancreas and this allows you get tolerance back.
    The only way to know is get your blood sugars back in control and get you Hbac1 back into the normal range. Then experiment. Try bread and see what happens. One portion wont hurt in the long run. But you will know how it effects you.

    I personally like to have a cheat meal once a week, like pizza, curry or what ever I fancy.
     
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  11. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    I'm the same but again, I consider myself extremely lucky in that the changes to my body allow this. I monitor and keep an eye, but always know one day it could change. It's also easily addictive, so if you do this it does need some willpower I have foUnd

    If it ever stops being tolerated then I will stop doing it.

    I wish it worked for everyone
     
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  12. Andy_Warlow

    Andy_Warlow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It all requires will power. But it does help, I am stubborn and don't like losing. I am not going to lose diabetes.

    I find there is always going to bad days.

    I wish it worked for everyone too, but like your self feel lucky that may changes allows this.
     
  13. Lilysun

    Lilysun · Member

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    Thanks again all!! Can I ask what am I roughly aiming for for my diabetes to be considered in remission? Blood sugars in morning today were 7.8 which is still high I think. Is it just a low hb1ac score or a combo of both hb1ac in range AND morning blood sugars low?
     
  14. Andy_Warlow

    Andy_Warlow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    Blood sugar goes up and down during the day. Fasted 4.0 - 5.9 m mol is normal.

    After food up to 7.8 m mol 2 hours after eating.

    But You can go high up to 10 after eating, it is more how quick it goes down as well.

    Your Hb1ac is a three month average and usage different unit, but anything below 42 is normal up 48 is pre diabetic. above 48 is diabetic.

    I hope this helps.


    Also bare in mind, there is a thing called dawn effect. When your body is getting ready for the day and causes your blood to send sugar from the liver, into the body. This can evaluate blood sugar for a small period. So maybe check when you wake up and two hours after.
     
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  15. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    More likely is that there will be a time in the future when you stop thinking of bread as food at all..

    If you start thinking of it now as a mild poison you'll get there even quicker.
     
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  16. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    With regards to breastfeeding I’ve anecdotally read lots to suggest many people do this and both they and baby are fine. What could be wrong with real unprocessed natural foods? Limiting calories imo is far more likely to lead to milk supply issues than a decent supply of healthy fats and proteins to fuel you both with lots of energy without the blood sugar excesses.

    I’d also suggest you speak to specialists in breast feeding and/or keto. Many drs, nurses, midwives and health visitors know next to nothing about either beyond the snapshot of their initial conventional training. And they propagate many myths about both.

    I used to provide b/f support many years ago and the dietary information and training then focussed on the standard good eating advice (eatwell) ie what we all get regardless of need or circumstances. Carbs were never mentioned at all. I’ll take a look for some up to date relevant links. Here’s one for starters from all lech league that kind of says what I did above https://www.llli.org/breastfeeding-info/weight-loss-mothers/

    I’m wondering if @wiflib is still around as she might have good info?
     
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  17. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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  18. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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  19. Blessedarethecheesemakers

    Blessedarethecheesemakers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, congratulations on your baby! I was diagnosed T2 after gestational diabetes for my second baby, nearly 7 years ago, at age 39. It wasn’t pre-existing for me as I’d been tested a few times after having GD for my first baby, and for the second baby the GD came on very late, at 37 weeks.

    After my diagnosis I went low carb pretty strictly, lost 4stone, all while breastfeeding him for 2.5 years, and kept my levels at non-diabetic numbers for 6 years, until my recent surprise pregnancy caused havoc with my sugars and my habits and I’m now postnatally starting the journey of trying to sort myself out again. But after my second baby and the low carbing, I did find my tolerances improved to some things, presumably because I’d lost some of the internal organ fat maybe? In particular my triglycerides were much improved. I then maintained my hba1c with a broadly low carb diet but still with occasional treats (proper ones - I didn’t waste my precious carbs on bread and pasta!). My huge ongoing challenge is to prevent an occasional treat creeping into becoming a frequent one.

    A post-GD diagnosis of T2 never feels nice. But you can do this. I have found that my most successful management has been when I’ve actively engaged with the community on this forum.
     
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  20. Lilysun

    Lilysun · Member

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    BD273486-AA2C-4A19-A1BC-52CA1C9524BE.jpeg Thank you this is all really useful and encouraging. I do feel as though I can do this even whilst breastfeeding. This is my graph today after having been low carb for a couple of days. As you can see all day levels have remained under 9, but I’m not sure these are good enough yet. Over time will it get lower if I carry on this way? I was so strict today I’m not sure how much stricter I could be!
     
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