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Helpful types of lightbulbs?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Dartmoormaid, Oct 30, 2020.

  1. Dartmoormaid

    Dartmoormaid · Member

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    Hello

    Would anyone have some tips please as to whether there's any lightbulbs which might help reduce glare, see more clearly....very light sensitive, blurred vision and equally need light as dull situations etc?

    I appreciate everyone's different and have been initially diagnosed with pre proliferative retinopathy and now waiting further information after another screening. A friend suggested the possiblity of daylight bulbs......might try one On dull days like today and with the approaching shorter days, it's becoming increasingly necessary and uncomfortable with artificail light....also very sensitive to sunlight.

    Thank you very much
     
  2. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I assume that you would be happy with indirect lighting to provide an overall light level without a direct beam of light to your eyes.

    You might consider fluorescent lights which can (depending on the tube's colour temperature) give a more distributed background lighting.
    This does, of course, involve some electrical wiring.

    I think that pearl light bulbs use to have less glare in the old days, but don't recall seeing them in modern energy efficient bulbs.

    Up-lighters which cast light on walls and ceilings can also give a more distributed background lighting.
    These can be fitted as wall lights, or bought as free standing lights.

    Something like this https://www.argos.co.uk/product/9061882?clickSR=slp:term:uplighters:4:12:1 for example.

    Daylight bulbs can be a good idea, but I think that this is a separate issue.
     
  3. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Oh, perhaps tinted glasses?
    Perhaps a yellow tint that is/was used for driving at night?
    Just something to cut the glare down a bit without a major reduction in overall visibility.
     
  4. Dartmoormaid

    Dartmoormaid · Member

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    Thank you very much for taking the time and trouble with your suggestions, you've been very helpful.......I'll explore these.
     
  5. Dartmoormaid

    Dartmoormaid · Member

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    Thank you very much ....will investigate this too
     
  6. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Daylight bulbs are great, my dad was registered blind he had some sight but glare was the worst thing for him, we put daylight bulbs all round the house and it gave him so much more independence- we had a strip light in the kitchen which the blind society recommended as it’s better and safer for lighting up the whole area - apparently light from a strip light can get into all corners ??
     
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  7. Dartmoormaid

    Dartmoormaid · Member

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    Thank you ...that's very helpful information and to hear it's made such a difference for your dad. Local shop's in the process of sorting one out for me to try......they're initially suggesting a 60W.....will give it a go. With best wishes
     
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  8. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    Another suggestion for tinted glasses!

    Years ago I had a serious eye problem (completely unrelated to diabetes) which left me with a damaged eye with its pupil fixed wide open and it was extremely painful. I was a glasses wearer anyway, and for years had already used light sensitive/photosensitive prescription lenses, so one pair of glasses automatically adjusts to all light conditions, and having these are a real godsend. But you can also get various fixed tint lenses to suit your needs - and these would be much cheaper.
     
  9. Dartmoormaid

    Dartmoormaid · Member

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    Gosh,that sounds difficult and good the photosensitive lenses help you. Thank you very much for responding and your helpful siggestion. I've been using some tinted glasses ( from ihe RNIB) suitable to wear over my exisitng glasses which generally help 'though on very sunny days, I now tend to stay in or find a shaded place. At some point...when I've received a diagnosis, will explore the photosensitive ones With best wishes
     
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