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New type I

Discussion in 'Food, Nutrition and Recipes' started by Ashland, Jun 7, 2008.

  1. Ashland

    Ashland · Active Member

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    Hey to everyone,
    I'm 18 I got diagnosed as type 1 on thursday, and (I guess like with everyone) they gave me all these leaflets about how and what to eat.

    I have a question..
    A lot of the advice seemed to revolve around your typical "eat healthily" advice that non-diabetic people are supposed to do, which is great because I did all that anyway.

    But are there specificthings i should avoid? I'm good with knowing what to eat, but a little list of definite "never eat this" foods would be good, maybe things I wouldn't have thought of? Like I understand icecream, chocolate and so forth aren't the best of ideas :p but how about say, pineapple?

    Also, a lot of the emphasis appeared to be on losing weight. Course, as a type 1 I've (scarily) losttwo and a bit stone over the past month or so. Since it was mostly muscle, and I'd like to put it back on that way, I'd like to know if it's as easy as "eat more protein, do more excercise" like before, or are there other considerations now I'm a lifelong gold member of the blood-sugar club?

    (It just helps if you think of it like that :p )

    Apologies for the ridiculously long first post. I'd greatly appreciate all your help, thankyou!
     
  2. lionrampant

    lionrampant · Well-Known Member

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    I'm tired so I'll just direct you to my posts in this thread: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=2953

    Working out is easy so long as you keep your glucose sweets handy. When I get the timing right I hit the gym three times a week. I'm 24 and type 1. Just don't mess up your per-meal carb intake by searching out protein and forgetting the accompanying carbohydrates! :mrgreen:
     
  3. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    Go to the library and get a copy of Dr. Bernstein's Complete Diabetes Solution. It won't be on the shelves. they NEVER stay there . It's expensive( text-book type price), but if you can get your own copy, do so. It will teach you everything you need to live a long healthy life. Also aim to keep tight control, once you know how.
    You are young and should have MANY good years.
    Good luck from "someone's Grandma".
     
  4. Nellie

    Nellie · Well-Known Member

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    I'd disagree about the Bernstein book.
    You can if you want read large chunks of his work on the internet. Be aware that although he has many vociferous advocates he suggests that control is impossible without extreme low carbing. (less than 30 carbs a day).
    Its certainly not a good idea to eat to many empty calories in the form of sweets/pastries etc . Starchy carbohydrates to vary in their effect on individual blood sugars. I find no problems with new potatoes, pasta (though strangely did at first) and some types of rice. Risotto rice sends my BS through the roof. The only way is to weigh the portion and test your BS before and after eating to find how the food effects you.
    The same testing advice applies with fruit though as a general rule fruits from temperate climates seem to have less sugar than those from the tropics. Most people seem to have few problems with berries.
    I agree about taking glucose with you whilst exercising, also you need to test before and during to see what happens.
     
  5. Ashland

    Ashland · Active Member

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    Nellie, thanks a lot - I hadn't realised until I read around this forum a bit that certain foods don't affect everyone the same way. Much less confused now (strangely enough)

    I think I'll give Dr. Bernstein a miss til I know more... super-low carb vs. high carb is still (in my mind) this raging debate that I'm just not knowledgeable enough to enter, and I'm due to speak to my specialist tomorrow anyway, so that should be fine.

    Excercise advice, thanks a lot :) may not be for a while though, I'm still trying to get a reading that isn't double figures :? but it's only been three days, I guess I'll get there quite quickly now I know what's going on?
     
  6. lionrampant

    lionrampant · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah. What constantly amazed me is how ridiculously fast the hospital turnaround time for newly diagnosed folk is. I mean... you must have been in hospital for what, one day?

    Anyway, yeah over time you'll get better at controlling it. As for the low-carb/high-carb debate - avoid it mate. It's... "worrying" in my opinion. It seeks easy solutions where there are none.

    Eat a balanced diet, work with your dietitian to figure out your best daily intake (I reckon it'll be around 120-180 carbs per day given your age, depending on lifestyle), and it all just falls into place. Well, that plus getting a handle on how to adjust your insulin. ;)

    It's easier than you think, but harder than some people would have you believe.

    Oh, and some advice since you're probably of an age where clubbing will be a weekly thing (oh to be at university again... 8) ) :

    Alcohol is not your friend. You cannot drink the way your mates can, so don't even try. Ever had a hangover? Right, now imagine that combined with the symptoms of dehydration... it's like a super-hangover. Sadly as diabetics we dehydrate more often, and with much nastier consequences. What's more, it screws with your hypo awareness.

    Beer - will rocket your blood sugars, but not right away. Only after your body's processed a certain amount of the alcohol out and starts making glucose again. Still drinkable, just don't do 10 pints in a row.

    Spirits (vodka, jack daniels, sambuca, etc) - Will just get your drunk as normal, but are more likely to inhibit glucose production and send you hypo if you're dancing/clowning around. Also remember to order them with DIET mixers - otherwise you might end up having the opposite problem of hitting 20 and 25 before you even get to the third round.

    And now for a socially awkward bit of advice
    Birds do not find it impressive when you have to jump off and run for the kitchen to drink a bottle of lucozade, if you catch my drift? So you know... remember all physical exercise uses energy. :shock: :wink:
     
  7. LadyJ

    LadyJ · Active Member

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    Newbie

    There are two main schools of thought for type 1s:

    1) You can bascially eat a normal, healthy diet provided that you carefully match the carbs you eat with the bolus insulin you take

    2) You should cut out as many carbs as possible from your diet.

    I think there is a great middle path whereby you can cut down on your carb intake (I tend to go for about 130g-ish per day which is not mad, but doable) AND shoot the relevant insulin.

    It is rubbish to say you can't drink alcohol. Obviously the same health warnings apply to you as to anyone else in that you want to be careful not to drink excessively too often! But provided you are careful not to go to bed too low (because alcohol can inhibit your liver from dumping glucose when necessary) you'll be just fine (although avoid lager - very carby!) You are only 18 and if you try to deny yourself half the pleasures of life (like going out with your mates) you won't be able to stick to anything for long. This is a LONG HAUL now - you have to find a moderate path and go with what works for you.

    I'm 28 and was diagnosed 7 months ago. I have reduced (but not radiacally aka Dr Bernstein) carbohydrates and I carefully carb count. My A1C is 6.1% and dropping gradually as the months pass. This is very do-able and I don't feel deprived of anything. Although you want to avoid complications, you have to live life in the meantime!

    Good luck!
     
  8. LadyJ

    LadyJ · Active Member

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    P.s. It is entirely normal for you to have lost weight pre-diagnosis.

    You're not expected to lose any more. Weight loss only really helps with insulin resistance which is a type 2 concern, so don't worry about that.

    What you need to worry about is keeping your blood glucose levels normal and eating healthily.

    You need to test test test - use your meter to figure out what foods affect you and how and then use that information to adjust your diet and your insulin dosages.
     
  9. Ashland

    Ashland · Active Member

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    Thanks very much LadyJ :) I'm well used to it now, soon I won't be able to remember what it was like pre-diabetes!
    Makes me laugh the amount of alcohol advice I'm getting - everyone thinks I'm a complete drunk because I'm little and young :p I didn't drink anyway!

    Not on a bolus regime yet, but I'll keep that in mind for when I am :) out of interest (and impatience, to be honest) how long did it take before you got onto basal/bolus?
     
  10. lionrampant

    lionrampant · Well-Known Member

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    If you're a student (which you haven't specified), you should be ashamed of yourself! :p :wink:
     
  11. LadyJ

    LadyJ · Active Member

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    I was put onto the basal/bolus immediately on diagnosis.

    It provides you with much greater flexibility over content and timing of meals. I would really PUSH to get on to it.

    many medical professionals assume that it's everyone's worst nightmare to have to do 4 injections (sometiems more) per day. You know what? The nightmare is getting type 1 diabetes, going blind, losing limbs etc etc etc.

    Seriously, it is regarded as being the best, modern approach in allowing type 1s to have normal diets and lifestyle.
     
  12. maturetype1

    maturetype1 · Member

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    Hi Ashland
    I've looked and you're on the same insulin as I was put on in December 07 when I was diagnosed. Humalog mix25 is not the way to go my blood sugar was all over the place, I think it's fine for the elderly who do little exercise and eat very much the same amount of carbs each meal. You have no flexibilty with your eating patterns and excercise I change over to Basal/Bolus on 30th April 08 and I've been great since then walk loads eat when I want. I think if I was you I'd be asking to change over, that's unless it's really suiting you. I felt as though I'd got my life back not having to eat to the Insulin but taking insulin to suit my meals and the times I wanted to eat.

    Good Luck with everything
     
  13. Ashland

    Ashland · Active Member

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    Lionrampant - I'm not a student..Yet :p all going to plan I'll be a vet student in semptember though, a species notorious for snorkeling through vodka at every opportunity. They have two freshers weeks :D Maybe I'll be a convert yet

    Everyone else - thanks for showing me I'm not just an impatient needy kid! What does the switch involve? I tried to read up, but the leaflets they give out appear to be best suited as hamster bedding.
     
  14. maturetype1

    maturetype1 · Member

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    When I changed over I had already had my morning dose of mix25 so come teatime I only took half my usual number of units and took the long acting insulin at bedtime I went low during the night so had to treat a hypo but just carb counted and shoot insulin to match from breakfast the next day.
    You take a long acting insulin(Basal) and then you take fast acting insulin at meal times or with snacks over 1.2carbs. The main difference is that you inject more (I now inject a minimum of 5 times daily) not just morning and evening. You have more feedom with what you eat because you shoot each time you eat. With mix25 you've injected in the morning and that insulin has to last you until you're next in the evening so you are more likely to go yo-yo (high and low)
     
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