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Weight training

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Benbaclat, Jul 12, 2017.

  1. Benbaclat

    Benbaclat Type 1 · Member

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    hi everybody ,! I have type one diabetes's and train weights 3-5 Times per week, I've heard about the low-carb high-fat diet, ( is that just for Type II? ) but I was wondering about a high protein, low carb diet? Does anybody have any information on that one for me? Are there any weight trainers out there who could give any kind of advice on the matter?
     
  2. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello:)

    I'll tag @TorqPenderloin for you who I believe is a regular gym goer and resistance trainer.

    LCHF is not just for T2's as non-diabetics can also follow this dietary approach. Equally, a T1 could go down a LCHF way of life - although there are advantages and disadvantages to that as well.

    All I'd say about high protein and low carb, is that you may find that you need to bolus for protein (and a fair bit for some of us) in the absence/limitation of carbohydrates. It's a phenomenon called gluconeogenesis I think, and although it's pretty cool in theory - it's also very annoying.

    I'll also tag @robert72 who is a notable member of the forum who follows a ketosis diet. I'm not sure about his protein intake, but if you have any questions regarding LC - he'd be a great source of info/advice:)

    If you're looking to try a drastic diet change, the best way to do it is shoot straight down the middle and then lean either way till you find what works for you.
     
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  3. Benbaclat

    Benbaclat Type 1 · Member

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    Thanks dude, I appreciate any advice, as before I joined this forum I felt alone in my battle with type 1
     
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  4. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You won't be alone here, that's for sure:)
     
  5. robert72

    robert72 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    hi @Benbaclat

    I am a low-carbing type 1 but I'm not sure I can really help you with the weight training aspect. I am more hi fat than high protein... 5% carb, 15% protein and 80% fat. Of course you can have a low carb high protein diet but my understanding is that excess protein is turned to glucose through gluconeogenesis, so it might be a case of trial and error to see what your protein needs are. Then you can balance the carbs and fat however you want, to make up your total calories needs.
     
  6. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I used to be a competitive powerlifter and played baseball in college (I'm in the USA). Now, I lift weights and run for the health aspects.

    Is a low carb diet reserved for people with t2? Absolutely not. In fact, I'd dare to say it's just as advantageous for someone with t1.

    The evidence on high protein diets is that it's not safe if you have existing kidney damage, but there's no evidence to support that a high protein diet can damage your kidneys.

    I eat a diet very high in meat which normally means around 3000 calories and somewhere in the range of 250-300g of protein. Carbs are generally below 100g and I don't have much of a need to monitor fat.

    Can't say the approach has hindered my weight lifting. I'm not sure what your goals are but It hasn't stopped me from heavy weight/low rep resistance training.
     
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