1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2017 »
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Help..

Discussion in 'Gestational Diabetes' started by Daniellarose91, Jun 15, 2017.

  1. Daniellarose91

    Daniellarose91 Gestational · Newbie

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hi, first time mummy and worried as been diagnosed with diabetes in my pregnancy
    Average sugar level? What is everyone's as I'm sure mine is high and low ..
    thank you
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  2. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,841
    Likes Received:
    7,435
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Welcome @Daniellarose91 and congratulations on your pregnancy :)

    First of all, don't worry :) The screening for Gestatiinal Diabetes has been tightened up so that its identifying more ladies with GD. That's good as it means you can get any help that you might need.

    How many weeks are you? Have you seen a dietician yet? How high are your blood sugars?
     
  3. Daniellarose91

    Daniellarose91 Gestational · Newbie

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1

    Hiya..
    They did give me all the details and websites but don't seem much help with me.
    This evening is 9.8 hour after my dinner which was chicken and brown rice?

    This morning 4.2 which isn't bad?
     
  4. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,841
    Likes Received:
    7,435
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Your 4.2 is good :) The 9.8 is a bit higher than ideal but it's still,early days so it will take you a while to find what works for you.

    Keeping records of what you eat and your blood sugar after will be really helpful if you need input from a dietician or nurse as they'll be able to make suggestions. For example, you might find you can only tolerate a smaller portion of rice than you usually have. You might also find that adding a little more fat to your meal can slow down the blood sugar rise. You can also bulk meals out with extra veg.

    This site explains the principles well:

    http://www.gestationaldiabetes.co.uk/gestational-diabetes-diet/

    You'll find food like full fat Greek yoghurt, peanut butter (no added sugar), nuts, etc good to slow down blood sugar rises and to help keep your blood sugar smooth.
     
  5. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,841
    Likes Received:
    7,435
    Trophy Points:
    178
  6. busydiabeticmum

    busydiabeticmum I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    354
    Likes Received:
    651
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I have always been told no higher than 7.8 at 1 hr after eating... if it is higher than that test again at 2 hrs to see if it is coming down. If it is high consistently then I would call the diabetes midwife and get it sorted a.s.a.p.

    4.2 is excellent.

    I would look at the volume of carbs your eating, my dietitian told us to aim for 50-60g of carbs per meal (personally I go lower but I was already a low carber and know what my body can take and can't take so I wouldn't advise it)

    Yes brown rice is said to be good but measure out the right amount...

    Also I agree that you should ask to see a dietitian to get help as each hospital is different and gives different advice! (Yep this is silly)

    Anyway don't worry for now, keep testing and if in doubt they should have given you the diabetes midwives phone number. Give her a call and she can help you better than us.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook