1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

“Reversing” prediabetes

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Doireallyneedanams, Mar 21, 2021.

  1. oldgreymare

    oldgreymare Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    378
    Likes Received:
    344
    Trophy Points:
    123
    As far as I can tell, all the research results from Prof Taylor group so far are from the DiRECT study. This is a small but rigorously followed up research project, however it focuses on overweight/obese individuals (BMI between > 27 and < 45, average weight 90-100 kg at start). The Newcastle diet protocol to achieve T2 remission worked for approximately 60% of participants and continued remission after 2 years does appear linked to maintaining > 10 kg weight loss in these individuals.

    https://www.directclinicaltrial.org.uk/
    https://www.directclinicaltrial.org.uk/Publications.html

    Prof Taylor's group are now starting a different research trial to examine the potential to reverse T2 in normal weight individuals (BMI <27) called the ReTune study. But this is only just closing recruitment, so several years before we will have the results.

    https://www.ncl.ac.uk/magres/research/diabetes/newstudy-retune/
     
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

    Messages:
    17,981
    Likes Received:
    12,059
    Trophy Points:
    298
    The 2 year remission (anything under 48 mmol/mol so not really "remission" to normality) was down to 36% of participants.

    I have studied it fairly deeply which is why I rarely recommend starvation as a way to put T2 into reverse.

    Crash diets aren't great for long term weight loss as many other studies have shown.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. oldgreymare

    oldgreymare Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    378
    Likes Received:
    344
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Oops, I wasn't as clear as I should have been! Outcome of DiRECT trial after 24 months -

    Durability of a primary care-led weight-management intervention for remission of type 2 diabetes: 2-year results of the DiRECT open-label, cluster-randomised trial http://eprints.gla.ac.uk/180894/

    '....of those participants who maintained at least 10 kg weight loss (45 of 272 with data), 29 (64%) achieved remission; 36 (24%) of 149 participants in the intervention group maintained at least 10 kg weight loss. Serious adverse events were similar to those reported at 12 months, but were fewer in the intervention group than in the control group in the second year of the study (nine vs 22). Interpretation: The DiRECT programme sustained remissions at 24 months for more than a third of people with type 2 diabetes. Sustained remission was linked to the extent of sustained weight loss.' My emphasis. So the result is that the ND approach may help some individuals to achieve remission. But like you, I personally feel low carb may be a more sustainable

    If I remember correctly, the rationale for the ND study was to see if this protocol can provide GPs with a more cost effective, less drastic approach to reverse prediabetes/T2 diabetes than recommending bariatric surgery. It will be interesting to see what comes out of the ReTune study.

    But like you, I personally feel low carb may be a more sustainable and user friendly approach for most individuals to achieve and maintain remission.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook