1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

??????????????

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Marz Barr, Aug 1, 2008.

  1. Marz Barr

    Marz Barr · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Why can,t we give blood i did it before i became diabetic and i feel guilty when i see the adds for it on the T.V and i would love to know why ?
     
  2. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

    Messages:
    8,157
    Likes Received:
    340
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I don't KNOW the answer to this, but would suspect that our blood chemistry is wrong and we may be using medication that might not suit a recipient.
     
  3. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

    Messages:
    10,098
    Likes Received:
    232
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I picked this off the net,it is about Canada but it probably applies world wide.

    Here are some quotes from the Canadian Diabetes Association web page

    "If you take insulin, you are not eligible to donate. The rationale is that donating blood could interrupt your blood glucose control, and potentially lead to a hypoglycemic reaction in the clinic or on the way home.

    If you manage your diabetes with lifestyle or diabetes pills, you may be eligible, depending on your overall health and if you meet the requirements listed below. Many people who have type 2 diabetes have blood pressure and heart problems, which would prevent them from donating.

    Canadian Blood Services divides willing donors into 3 categories: those who can donate right away, those who can donate after a waiting period and those who cannot donate. Some criteria for each category are listed below. These rules are in place to protect both the donor and to ensure the safety of the Canadian blood supply."

    "Donations may not be taken from you if you:

    * Are taking insulin.
    * Have certain diseases or medical conditions. Check with your local clinic.
    * Have lived in certain regions of Africa, where you may have been exposed to a new strain of the virus that causes AIDS (HIV-I Group O), or if you received a blood transfusion while visiting there, or have had sex with someone who has lived there. This is based not on race or ethnicity, but rather possible exposure to HIV-I Group O. Countries included are: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Niger and Nigeria.
    * May have been exposed to HIV, including sexual activity with someone who has tested positive for HIV.
    * Had possible exposure to CJD (Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease) or vCJD (Variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease) between specific dates and in specific geographic areas (check with your local clinic)."

    and here is a quote off of the Canadian blood services page.

    "5. Diabetes:

    If your diabetes is treated with insulin, you are unable to donate blood."

    short and sweet ... if you are diabetic and treat with Insulin ... NO.
     
  4. DiabeticGeek

    DiabeticGeek · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I suspect that part of the reason is a fallacious concern about a risk of CJD. It has been suggested that vCJD might be transmitted by bovine insulin (such as Hypurin). This is particularly daft - partly because bovine insulin is quite unusual these days, and partly because no one has ever been shown to have been infected by this route. However, the blood transfusion people are sufficiently paranoid that the merest hint of an increased CJD risk is likely to be enough for a blanket ban.
     
  5. Marz Barr

    Marz Barr · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    thankyou Hanadr Sue and Diabeticgeek
    that makes things a little clearer
    Wendie
     
  6. Nellie

    Nellie · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Its not my insulin use that prevents me donating in France. As long as I have good control its OK. Its having lived in the UK during the late 80s and 90s. The 'risk' of CJV means most countries ban people who have lived in the UK during this period from donating.
     
  7. Marz Barr

    Marz Barr · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Hi Nellie
    surley they could test the blood a few weeks before people donate
     
  8. Nellie

    Nellie · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    No test possible, except at post mortem and I'm not going that route :wink:
    Sarah, I think that other countries through necessity (they need all the blood they can get) have changed their rules realising that insulin is not a problem (nor is it detectable)the biggest risk is to the doner. Funnily enough for years I couldn't donate whole blood in the UK because I had Hep A as a young child, now they allow it if you had it before the age of 10.
    With cjd other countries don't dare risk the possibility that 'British' blood is contaminated. Just one case which could be proved to come from that source could reduce public confidence in the system ( even though those countries may also had their own outbreaks of BSE.)
     
  9. SilverAndEbony

    SilverAndEbony · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I asked the blood transfusion service if I would ever be able to give blood - I used to, but being diagnosed with epilepsy and taking AEDs put a stop to that! I wondered what the criteria is for donating, which is why I emailed them.

    Their reply, as far as the diabetes element of my question is:

    "Diabetics can only give blood if their condition is controlled by diet alone. If you are taking medication or Insulin it is not possible for you to be accepted as a donor.

    This is because Diabetics are unable to tolerate blood donation very well whilst needing medication."

    I assume the problem is with our problems controlling out blood glucose levels with out help. I wonder, do you think our meds could have an adverse on the patients BG levels? It'll be interesting to find out if it does
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook