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Advised against Blood glucose meter

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by mrpaulbradley, Sep 2, 2015.

  1. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have a feeling that doctors look at people's nails without telling them, because when nails are showing signs of illness it is usually pretty obvious, like if they are pale, or concave, for example. A doctor can probably spot these signs by seeing your nails as you sit there.

    It's interesting, a few years ago when I went through a period of intense physical and psychological stress, a horizontal line appeared on my nails and eventually grew out. I think the body draws resources into where they are needed the most in times of crisis.
     
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  2. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    The funny thing is that my lung disease was spotted by a co-worker long before formal diagnosis just by looking at my nails. The doctor only looked at my nails when I mentioned it first. I think it may be one of those 'old-fashioned' diagnostic tools that aren't being used by the newer generation of doctors.
     
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  3. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, that's probably true. What did your nails look like when your co-worker spotted the sign?
     
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  4. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Hard to describe - they call them "clubbed", but it's something you notice more in profile - the ends of the fingers are very inflated and curved. They remind me of chicken drumsticks, lol.

    My co-worker even told me the disease name - she had a neighbour who'd had it so she recognised the symptoms.

    Apparently some heart disease causes the same clubbing, but that's been ruled out.
     
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  5. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, that's really interesting. Good thing your co-worker knew the signs :)
     
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  6. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Ah well, kind of a Damocles sword kind of thing - no treatment, no clue what caused it and no idea when/if it will start progressing again. I sometimes wonder if I'd have been better off not knowing. Unlike the diabetes, there's nothing I can do to influence the outcome.
     
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  7. eddie1968

    eddie1968 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Three years ago I spent a month critically ill in the ICU. When I was discharged I noticed a different coloured horizontal line in all my nails that showed my body had been under immense physical stress at the time of my illness. Fascinating stuff.
     
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  8. silky1

    silky1 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I haven't read every response, so all I can so is speak for myself - I'm a serious needle phobic (to such an extent I have high levels of oral sedation for even minor treatments involving needles and have given talks to teams of NHS staff (incl consultants) on the matter (I've had more than a few doctors refuse to treat me !!)

    I've been diagnosed just over a fortnight and if anyone tried to take my testing meter off me - I'd rip their arms off. - I was told to test twice a week unless I noticed my sugars climbing.

    I've learnt so much since joining this forum - I do a fasting sugar daily (for now) and have quickly realised that (for me) testing an hour earlier than normal can make quite a difference - so ideally I need to narrow down my testing window to get realistic comparisons.

    It's also useful for before / after testing for a food you don't know how it will affect you - I've weirdly found that anything involving beef seems to put my levels up by 3.6 whatever I started from (weird).

    I also joined Weight-Watchers last night which was very interesting - Fruit is "free" on their points scale - there were two diabetics at the meeting - one acted like fruits were a poison chalice to be avoided at all costs - the other one eats a humungus bowl of mixed berries and fruits every night -

    The latter lady has lost 5 stone and looks and feels the picture of health - admittedly her sugar levels are slightly higher than I'd like mine to be - but at the same time, I also wouldn't eat fruit to the level she does - but so far - the ones I've tried haven't had a major negative impact on me, whilst a lot of them also have related and unrelated health properties to diabetes including heart protection and bad cholesterol reduction - two very important areas for those with Type II diabetes. I know it's off topic - but I have a surprisingly low total cholesterol (below 5) - but the overall type mix isn't good - I'm seriously praying I can re-adjust those levels through diet before they catch and "statin" me - I take enough tablets as it is and heard enough about statins to know it's somewhere I really don't want to go unless I have to.

    And I guess it really isn't off topic - because I couldn't do any of this without my testing meter and the info I'm picking up from other members and offline diabetics.
     
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  9. Erin

    Erin Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I can't understand why you were refused the meter at the NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde area staff.
     
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  10. Celeriac

    Celeriac Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was told to buy a meter by practice nurse, when diagnosed. Pharmacies should have forms enabling you to claim the VAT back from HMRC, but I have yet to find one which stocks them.

    I have been buying my own disposable lancets and test strips for some time now. 50 strips costs 21.99 - 23.99 via Amazon post free or I can get them £5 for 10 from ASDA. A box of 100 lancets costs 16.99 from Amazon.

    However, since I want to buy a ketones meter, I think NHS should pay for the strips for my glucose meter, so that I can buy ketones strips.

    My GP did say that he would give me strips last time I saw him.

    If I hadn't tested I wouldn't know what pushes my blood glucose up !

    I would never reuse a lancet, I use Owen Mumford disposable ones. Putting them in landfill is fine by my local council.
     
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  11. mrpaulbradley

    mrpaulbradley Type 2 · Member

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    Yeah, I just bit the bullet and ordered online. The site someone kindly gave me on here deducts VAT at source after a simple 'I am diabetic' declaration.
     
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  12. MaryCanary

    MaryCanary Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi, I'm newly diagnosed a week ago and I too was refused a meter (I also live in the Greater Glasgow NHS area). The diabetes nurse said they don't really serve much purpose for T2 diet-controlled. I didn't believe her, suspecting it is a cost-cutting ploy by the NHS so I went to the local pharmacist to buy one. He said the same thing but finally - reluctantly - sold me an Accu-chek Aviva. I have gone right through all ten strips that come with it and managed to get only one reading - every other test showed 'E-4' on the screen. I have followed the instructions carefully yet that is all I get. I wonder what I could be doing wrong? Anyway, I don't much like the stabbing sensation on my fingers so I probably will just leave it for now.
     
  13. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You can reduce the discomfort by setting your lancet pen to the lowest number, usually 1, and only increasing it if you can't get enough blood. Also prick the side of your finger not the pad. Lancets get blunt and painful after several uses too.

    A meter is an important tool in controlling T2 diabetes and the discomfort/pain of testing is a small price to pay for better health, particularly avoiding the very serious and painful complications that come from high blood sugar over time. Many of us only test a lot at the start and can get away with one test a month after that.

    If you want to try again, I recommend the SD Codefree meter, available here:
    http://www.homehealth-uk.com/medical/blood_glucose_monitor_testing.htm

    ... because they have the cheapest test strips on the market. Buying one pack of 50 strips is not very expensive, but if you want to save more, there is a discount code if you buy 5 or 10 boxes, which brings the price down to about £5 for 50 strips.
    5 packs 264086
    10 packs 975833
     
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  14. MaryCanary

    MaryCanary Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thanks, CatLadyNZ. I will look into that.
     
  15. Homehusband

    Homehusband Prediabetes · Member

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    I was told the same but got one anyway was told by consultant that's it's good to check about 2-3 times a wk
     
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  16. Robo42

    Robo42 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have also in the last few years with the GP Diabetic nurse been told don't test yourself, must be a new save on money NHS directive. As I have always got free testers & managed to be prescribed the test strips over the years, I would not have been able to manage my diet and know what is good/bad without.
     
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  17. killtothis

    killtothis Type 1 · Member

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    You've probably already been offered, and I wouldn't want to go against what your medical team are suggesting..
    But if you do want a BG monitor I have a spare one that I don't use that's still boxed I'd be more than happy to send to you, I have no testing strips for you though, I snagged them from the box when I was running low waiting for my prescription.
     
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  18. Homehusband

    Homehusband Prediabetes · Member

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    I was told the same but still got one for some reason it's for my own peace of mind but it's your choice in the end
     
  19. Blonde45

    Blonde45 Type 2 · Newbie

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    I have been advised wasn't any point in getting one......its the HBa1c result.....got one anyone and found when moving my room round or doing anything really strenuous my levels crashed to 3.5 despite having eaten lunch and a banana half an hour after. It helps recognise when my levels are too high or too low as it can be difficult to tell and get very dizzy and tired anyway. I think it's probably cost as I live in Fareham and didn't get one yet my brother lives in Portsmouth and got one. How can you make informed choices without one as everyone is different!!!!
     
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  20. mrpaulbradley

    mrpaulbradley Type 2 · Member

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    That's extremely kind of you but I've already bought one. I'm sure another grateful soul will come along.
     
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