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Any advice for T1 skiing?

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by Rc04, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. Rc04

    Rc04 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Anyone got any advice about managing T1 when skiing? I've found some good info about exercise and sport, but not when it involves a full day of excerssie and having to account for cold temperatures as well. Also not sure of impact when exercising full day for 6 days one after the other? Any skiers out there who can help?
     
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  2. Dillinger

    Dillinger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I haven't been skiing for a while but I would drop your basal a bit and make sure you have pouches of glucose gel (you can get them in any running shop or places like Snow & Rock) the benefit of those are they are very fast acting easy to carry. If you are finding your bloods are low then make sure you eat to get them up. Test a lot and you'll keep on top of it.

    I've never noticed any cold related impacts on blood sugars.

    Monitor your basal over the holiday and be prepared to drop it; look out for overnight drops as well; so make sure you test before bed and react to any borderline lows.

    Skiing is a fantastic thing so don't worry too much just be prepared and you'll have a good time.

    Best

    Dillinger
     
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  3. Rc04

    Rc04 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Thanks very much. You're right skiing is great! And I want to be able to make the most of it. I was diagnosed 7 months ago age 46. My aim is to continue with the sports and active outdoor lifestyle I enjoy, so lots of new challenges - but that's what life's about!!
     
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  4. tommytangent

    tommytangent Type 1 · Newbie

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    Don't put your insulin and testing kit on your back. The insulin will freeze and the testing kit will give warnings or not allow you to test at all! On previous ski trips I have kept them both in the inside pocket of my ski jacket.
     
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  5. nickoedwards

    nickoedwards Type 1 · Member

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    I've been an avid skiier for years and love it! I'm also a Type 1 Diabetic and have been since the age of 4, I'm now 35. Last week I returned from a week skiing in Morzine. From experience the cold won't really have an effect on your glucose levels, not that I've noticed anyways. As a beginner you'll be doing a lot of rolling on the floor, getting up, walking around with skis on / skis off. This all digs away at your levels. You'll be surprised how much energy you'll use up just walking from your accommodation to ski lift if you've not done it before. As a beginner you won't be using that much energy skiing, it'll be more mental strain! As you progress and are picking up speed, that's when your thighs will be screaming! (An ice cold beer in a hot tub will aid recovery)

    On a typical day, I'll grab some porridge for breakfast and drop my insulin very slightly. I find that exercise raises mine slightly before it lowers. I'll carry a rucksack, from a diabetic point of view I'll carry a BM tester, my insulin, Jelly Babies and a snack like KitKats etc. I'll be wearing my helmet but will take a woolly hat and wrap it around the tester and pen. Only to protect it and me, if I were to fall (to note - I've also left them in my bag loose and they worked fine). On previous trips I've also worn a Dexcom and I've placed the receiver in my salopette pocket where was able to feel the vibrations. Normally, we'll stop mid-morning for a coffee break, I'll crack open on the KitKats and take a test. That will normally be enough to carry me through lunchtime.

    At lunch, we'll either take a sandwich with us or eat at a restaurant on the slopes. On the slopes I'll go for a bowl of pasta or something similar, if I were to take lunch, I'll drop my insulin slightly and finish it off with a Jelly Baby(s). Don't forget to drink water. At the end of the day, you'll no doubt go for a beer, whilst you're there grab some nachos etc. and test again, your evening meal might be later than you're used too at home. Demolish anything and everything you want at your evening meal! As previously mentioned it's the overnight shift that you'll have to watch out for.

    In terms of being hypo on the slopes, it's just like anywhere else really. However, I've had some pretty uncomfortable experiences where my fingers and toes became very cold. Since then, I've taken a second pair of gloves with me in my bag:

    http://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/the-...gclid=CKfWvrLTj9ICFYKw7QodaaIGIQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

    They are tight to my hands and still allow me to wear my ski gloves, basically a second layer. I can't really bend my fingers when I'm wearing both pairs so only use them when my hands are super cold, two pairs definitely do the trick! In terms of cold toes, you'll have to man-up or do as I did and take off my boots in a lovely warm slope-side eatery.

    Enjoy! I'm already jealous of you.

    Nick
     
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    #5 nickoedwards, Feb 14, 2017 at 1:12 PM
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2017
  6. jsee

    jsee · Newbie

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    I see this is an old thread. Not very many T1s ski, apparently.

    I live in British Columbia, Canada, which is one of those places where Europeans come to ski when they leave the continent. I often ski (alpine, not nordic) 60-70 days per season. I'm retired and live 35 minutes from deep powder. I'm old, but I ski steeps and trees anyway. I have been T1 for many (many, many) years.

    My insulin requirements drop by 30-50% during the ski season. Yours may not drop that much. Pay attention! Low BG is a constant concern, so onboard high carb junk food is essential. My pockets carry candy bars, high-calorie nutritional drinks (like Ensure or similar) etc. I worry less about high blood glucose. 11 is a lot safer than 4, and it won't stay up there for very long. And as a T1 diabetic, how often do you get to sit down with your back against a tree trunk and fantastic views before you, enjoying a chocolate bar?

    If your BG is still a little high at the end of the day, don't be too quick to try to treat it. It will continue to drop for several hours after heavy exercise. Patience!

    My CGM reader is a recent addition. I carry it in small flat pack that rides on a string around my neck and inside most of my layers of sweaters, fleece, coats, etc, so it stays warm. Can't see it very well when it's sunny out, though.

    Diabetics frequently have problems with circulation in their extremities. A modern pair of battery-powered gloves can be wonderful to prevent cold hands. Light synthetic glove liners are also effective.

    Do not attempt to ski in rental boots. They never fit right, and you may buckle them too tight and cut off circulation to your feet in an attempt to prevent your feet from swimming around inside them. Get a custom fitted pair of boots with liners and footbeds built specifically for you. You want a very snug fit, but you do not want to interfere with circulation. Battery boot heaters can also help. Never wear two pairs of socks or thick wool socks in an attempt to keep your feet warm. They will tend to bunch up in the most uncomfortable places, and that may result in cutting off circulation to parts of your feet.
     
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  7. cobbler

    cobbler Type 1 · Newbie

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    I have been type 1 since my mid 20's. I first skied when I was 50, twenty years ago. I drop my rapid insulin by 2 IU and eat a good breakfast aiming for slow release carbs. It is impossible to test on the mountain, even in the restaurants my equipment won't function. I usually forego my midday injection and just have a drink for lunch. Any potential rise in BG is offset by the exercise. I am conscious of low BG and keep aware of any symptoms. I carry plenty of carbs but have never needed them. My BG at my hotel return is usually excellent but will rise rapidly if I don't give myself a corrective insulin injection. I always test several times in the evening and before bed. I am pretty fit and I am active all year, which I think is very important.
     
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