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Back in the day!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Ushthetaff, Dec 22, 2019.

  1. rochari

    rochari Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Grant, what a nightmare and I can associate with what you describe. My dad would have run a mile but my mother could do enough for both of them! Until I left home in my teens dad left the room when I took the insulin kit out, he hated needles. He did National Service too, was a big strapping lorry driver and not to be messed with but a size 16 or 20 had him out the door, pronto.

    The hospital made a major mistake with me in my late teenage years regarding a new insulin I was put on (can't remember its name, but they had to find an alternative because my 'old' insulin was being discontinued). It was hypos all the way, which didn't stop despite daily reductions in dosage. I kept contacting them but they said it was just taking time to adjust! I was single, just moved to the city and transferred to a diabetic clinic there, plus I lived alone. The bad ones happened in the evenings and I usually always fitted. I got used to leaving the flat door unlocked and most times I managed to get into the hallway and my neighbours, bless them, would find me there and call an ambulance. My face bounced off the wall one night and I needed stitches along my forehead. The next morning my GP was horrified when I told him what had been happening and I was sent to the clinic there and then, with a stern letter from him in my hands. Everything was re-checked and it was found I’d been double-dosed.

    I could deal with hypos no matter how severe in my younger days but after that incident, I became completely phobic about them and that fear has never left me.

    Bill
     
  2. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    You have my absolute empathy Bill. Although I deserted the diabetic camp six years ago, as a result of hypos thhroughout my formative years, I have never liked to be alone, even now. This, together with a self-imposed adherence to the Lawrence Line Weight Diet which I started in August 1966, makes me realise how engrained Type 1 is in my subconscious. I do think that it ultimately gave me a stronger sense of self discipline. I just hope that your control is preventing the fuelling of the phobia. All the very best to you. Grant
     
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  3. Geri

    Geri Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    When I saw the insulin 'gun' and the blue through to orange colour chart for clinitest, I got a lump in my throat as I remember feeling so bad when it turned orange, which in the 70s, was quite often. I wish I had kept my insulin gun, I didnt use it, but it looks like a medieval torture instrument now and would be quite a curio. !
     
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  4. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    Hi,

    Yeah, I know what you mean about the aversion "orange" in the 70s.
    Lucky for me, by the time I past my driving test in 86? I managed to find a blue one..

    image.jpeg
     
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  5. No66

    No66 · Member

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    Back in the day when I was in hospital for 2,3 weeks introduction to insulin.There used to be a smoking room end of the ward for the smokers being a coronary ward also diabetic patients and Guinness, Mackeson in the fridge for the many older guys who had anemia. How times have changed not for the better on these two issues.
     
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  6. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I had exactly this car, but white (what's the significance in diabetes terms?!) straight after I passed my test!
     
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  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Yep, I had the Escort estate MK1 1300 just after passing my test.
     
  8. Ushthetaff

    Ushthetaff Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I had a mini mustard in colour, after I passed my test
    Relevance in diabetic terms it peed all the time it drank like a fish it’s control ( Hb1Ac) was sh**e well in the 90’s
    It’s yearly test was always problematic,
    Very poor circulation , performed badly in the cold,
    Probably described initially as Type 2 but very quickly developed into type 1 and no matter how much “ insulin” I put in it it never got better after that I got a blue ford escort estate and control picked up dramatically.
     
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  9. Ladybird1

    Ladybird1 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Brings back memories, 56 years T1 and still going strong. I remember having a small pan to "boil" my glass syringe and needles in it. A drawing up needle and a needle for injecting, both nearly the same diameter, thank goodness for the ultra fine ones now.
     
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