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Bariatric Surgery for T2's - Gastric Bypass

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Patch, Jan 17, 2018.

  1. ricke17

    ricke17 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hopefully you can stop your meds. In my case my diabetes got worse post-op. I must be one of the few where this happened and wondered if I was a misdiagnosed type 1.
     
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  2. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Were you stressed? Infections or anything happen to cause increased diabetes meds. Were you given steroids?
    Maybe your body got stressed out from the op!
     
  3. deb1960

    deb1960 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was warned that a fast weight loss can cause gallstones and sure enough I had to have my gallbladder out. It is a really painful condition and the surgery isn't a picnic either. I had a lot of stones which then caused pancreatitis. I wish I'd never had the gastric band which has caused on going problems. I was ill with a gastric bug at the beginning of the week which I think must have caused the area of the stomach where the band is to swell and even though the bug has gone I'm still vomiting when I eat anything
     
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  4. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I'd have a chat with my gp if it persists hun
     
  5. Kentoldlady1

    Kentoldlady1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    May I ask a question? This is just a question and by no means any sort of comment on problems etc.

    I was heading towards morbidly obese at over 16st. Have lost weight now but I am a realistic comfort eater who uses fear of t2d complications to keep my weight down and to stop eating carbs. However, I know I am only one crisis from eating everything in sight. One day at a time. But I have seriously considered this type of surgery in the past.

    For me, I know that I very much over eat. I could start in the morning and not stop until bed. At my worst, when metabolic syndrome had really set in I would get up in the middle of the night and eat then as well. It took a scare to make me face this, but I know that I could easily slip back.

    My question is if you know what you will be allowed to eat after surgery why not just eat that way now?

    The main reason that I didn't go down the surgery route was that I KNOW I comfort eat. What would I do instead? I have not conquered that at all. Its just that the fear of going blind and losing my feet is greater than my need to comfort eat. At the moment, but that might change.

    If the pre-op counselling is good does it tackle the problem of your over eating ? If it doesn't then surely the problems will remain after surgery. If it does tackle over eating then why not use the strategy now?

    As I said, not wanting to argue etc, but would really like to know what it is about the surgery that helps so much? Is it the food restriction that means you physically have to stop over eating? Or because it means that you just have to keep to a very strict diet which would have been impossible for you before?

    Thanks for the help.
     
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  6. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I can only speak for myself.
    I would be very very hungry on 3-4 egg sizes of food per day, for life without this op. Also NHS or any Dr I know wouldn't sanction such eating unsupervised and would or could led to anorexia.
    They reduce the stomach so less calories (carbs, protein and fats) to get satiety and leptin levels are satisfied too. The by-pass is so less nutrients are absorbed into the body so overeating (normal eating) is stopped by feeling full very very quickly and with teaspoons worth of food.
    Hunger and lack of supervision whilst doing such a drastic change in eating on my 9meds and insulin management. I don't want to die due to the hypo I cannot recover from (coma if lucky).
    I take heart/blood pressure meds too. I take thyroid meds and hormone meds. I don't know how to ween those nor have the meds to do it and the checking medical equipment to measure if and when meds need reducing so I don't have a heart attack or stroke.
    Even I cannot do that!
     
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  7. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I don't overeat. I eat normally or the normal I have been brought up on as a child, living out of hotels (working around the UK) in my young adulthood and watching people around me, at home and at work.
    I have eaten some very expensive food and avoid cheap foods, always have.
     
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  8. ricke17

    ricke17 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Re your meds post op: even though some aren’t available as liquids a good chemist can arrange for them to be made into liquid.
     
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  9. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Ickihun - I have to remark on your comment about anorexia. What you say isn't true.

    The dictionary definition is anorexia is loss of appetite. What you are describing doesn't describe a loss of appetite.

    Anorexia nervosa is a wholly different condition and for the vast majority of anorexia nervosa sufferers there is no loss of appetite. Indeed the hunger pangs continue, except that the disturbed/unwell mental state of the sufferer doesn't allow them to eat to satisfy that hunger in a healthy way. They might eat lots of, say, lettuce, or drink large quantities of water to fill their stomachs, but underlying that their bodies are screaming for nutrition. The important part of that is their mind not allowing them to do the sensible thing and actually eat.

    For those in the grasp of anorexia nervosa being told to "just eat something. In fact eat anything you enjoy" is a bit like saying, "just pop out to Jupiter and do some deep scientific research". It's just not possible.

    Rarely the individual works out what's going on and can address their underlying issues (like self-worth, feelings of entrapment, or whatever) for themselves, but for the vast majority it takes often intense therapy to for the individual to recognise and accept those issues and begin to understand how best to address or manage them.

    Deciding just to eat small portions and continue doing so doesn't constitute anorexia nervosa. It represents self-enforced starvation which, if continued, will in all likelihood lead to malnutrition.
     
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  10. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    The NHS are fully aware of all your concerns and are addressing them.
    No one known to the NHS for eating disorders would be allowed this op, at this time, I'm told.
    I don't binge eat nor comfort eat. I don't use food in substitute of something missing. I'm just needing so much insulin to function and severely insulin resistant and getting worse now not able to exercise. Walking in pain is my limit.
    I was a hairs breath away from being bed bound last winter. I'm doing all I can. I have been offered a solution to my excessive weight to keep me alive longer, so I've decided to take it.
    My 4st loss is just a drop in the ocean. I'd need another 5yrs at low carbing without any illness or stress (change of circumstances) to have a chance of getting to the obese only stage.
    It huge hard work. Something I can do if I'm getting constant support. All NHS money on meds and medical personnel.
    I don't want to break the NHS bank either!
     
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  11. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Kentoldlady - I have been fortunate never to have been a comfort eater or to carry enough weight to seek or consider bariatic surgery.

    Any form of disordered eating (whether too much, too little, feast and famine or whatever) should be investigated to work out whether there is a root cause, as opposed to just a bit of a habit. In most cases there's a reason why this happens.

    One thing I would say is that habits can be changed, even if it does take some time, and a lot of determination.

    As a former sufferer from anorexia nervosa I was terrified of reverting to those behaviours once the intensity of my treatment eased - especially as I was moving. Yes, moving countries, not just houses, so picking up where I left off was unlikely to have been credible. Of course I had difficult periods. I'm no super woman. Nobody making a major change in their lives does that without the odd waver or wobble, but once the root cause is understood there can be personal process put in place to help deflect from those doubts and reduce the chances of true reversion.

    I spoke a lot with my Consultant about the potential for a real revolving process with eating/not eating, but he reassured me that over time my likelihood of reverting would lessen and with each decade I would be more likely to develop a new addiction (i.e. rather than my drive for the needle on the scales to drop). I'm over 30 years from my anorexic times, and still waiting to experience the excesses of sex, drugs and rock and roll he mentioned. :) (Of course that last sentence is very flippant, and I apologise.)

    If you haven't already, please do consider seeing someone about the comfort eating. Honestly, once I truly understood why I carried out my damaging behaviour, it was so, so much easier to even attempt to turn the corner. Hopefully you might find a way to reduce its impact on your life.

    Good luck with it all. Out of control eating is horrid and very misunderstood in my view.
     
  12. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Like I said " I can only speak for myself" and as near anorexic in my youth as diagnosed by my psychologist last week. I only speak from my experience and my situation.
    I'm no expert in anorexia. I respect your comments out of your experience.
    Your explanation far out ways mine of what anorexia is. For which I thank your clarification. Thanks.
     
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  13. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I'm still awaiting to see surgeon or pass tier3 stage which I've been told is the most thorough of stages in the weight lose programme. More so now due to ensuring those with eating disorders get refused or given the help to get the weight off themselves.
    This operation isn't to fix eating disorders. Never has been.
    It's a life saving operation and very expensive and those not covered under the NHS have to pay without sometimes the support we are given or investigations.
    Can you image how often theirs is rushed through to save money or to keep insurance companies happy. I'd rather be regulated by the NHS who look after my whole care not just parts I can or cannot afford.
    Remember their statistics aren't exactly in keeping with ours do to those factors.
    UK statistics are far newer than say the USA ones as we only had a handful of surgeons but now increasing and original surgeons have more experience.

    A recent article in this forums diabetes news section declared UK remissions were still evident after 7yrs of the bariatric bypass.
    The roux-en-y style bariatric surgery has the best results in reversing type2 and prediabetic diabetes. I've concentrated most of my efforts in reading and asking/listening about those who have close proximity to this op, even GPs who listen to the changes their patients go through and need less or more of.

    Ultimately it is a personal choice and not one which should be taken without you feeling totally happy with why you need this life saving op.
     
  14. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I will be on regular metformin and not long release. I've asked and I can crush that one but I'll be in hospital when I'm needing it straight after op so they can sanction liquid metformin but not as effective and very expensive compared to tablets so reluctant to do. My slow-release are like torpedoes ha ha.
    By the time I take my meds I'll have no room for food. Something hopefully will be done to aid it. Fingers crossed. Maybe just done very very slowly?
    I believe iron tablets are the biggest struggle? You?
     
  15. ricke17

    ricke17 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I still take liquid metformin as the huge glucophage ones made me sick. Also when I was post op I used to even vomit up the crushed pills as you really have to crush them well so they’re like dust. Some pills you can’t crush.
     
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  16. ricke17

    ricke17 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I’m also on high doses of different vitamins rather than popping a multivitamin every day. I take vit b, b12, c, d, zinc and some others. I never had issues with lack of iron mainly due to the huge individual doses. As you know you malabsorb after the op so taking the higher doses means at least the body absorbs some of it.
     
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  17. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    How do you find liquid metformin in comparison to tablet metformin side affects?
     
  18. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I was shocked when on a training course for eating healthily via WLS programme that those who had decided to have op were still eating takeaways. Eh?
     
  19. ricke17

    ricke17 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I never really got many side effects taking metformin. As they said to me at the time of Surgery the RnY is a tool to assist. You’ll find that after a year or so you’re able to eat more than post Surgery.
     
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  20. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Do it while you can @akindrat18 . Not for those able to exercise some of the problem away for a while.
    The ones I've see on my programme aren't able to exercise in the conventional way.
     
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