Blood Monitors Compared

alphabeta

Well-Known Member
Messages
615
Type of diabetes
Type 1
Treatment type
Insulin
I used many meters
I recommend: Accu Chek Performa and even better Accu Chek Guide.
I do not recommend: OneTouch Ultra
 
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Rich12

Member
Messages
21
Type of diabetes
Type 2
Treatment type
Non-insulin injectable medication (incretin mimetics)
Dislikes
Snow
Sorry if this is not the correct place to post this question, but has anyone come across a really “smart” blood glucometer that can automatically send sugar readings to an iPhone (newer iPhones do not have a phone hack) and do smart analysis of the readings to recommend best insulin dosages?

Thank You

IMG_1960.jpg

I used to use this one with my iPhone.
 
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Deleted member 308541

Guest
I have just purchased a Lifesmart blue tooth meter here in Australia.

It is as accurate when compared with my Freedom lite readings, and the strips are subsidised by the NDSS (code 312) as well.

Comes in a reasonable carry case. although the lancing device is medievil and went into the bin.

https://mylifesmart.net.au/products/blood-glucose-plus-ketone/

The android LifeSmart Sugar Cheq app is good with some great features and works well with my Samsung phone, imports the readings from the meter in seconds

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.taidoc.tdlink.lifesmart2

glucometer-banner-FINAL.jpg
 

alangdunbar

Member
Messages
20
I have the Accuchek Mobile and have recely been given the Bluetooth Sensor that plugs directly into the side of the unit...This works with the MySugr app which is recommended by the NHS for recording and managing your BG readings
 

TooSweetForMe

Well-Known Member
Messages
287
Type of diabetes
Type 2
Treatment type
Insulin
I have the Accuchek Mobile and have recely been given the Bluetooth Sensor that plugs directly into the side of the unit...This works with the MySugr app which is recommended by the NHS for recording and managing your BG readings

I am in the US, but I use the Accu Check Guide Me and the mySugr app. My meter has Bluetooth capabilities. I also use a Diathrive meter, as I am in the middle of doing come comparison testing.
 
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Lisa69free

Well-Known Member
Messages
151
I have been testing two Blood Monitors and I'm afraid I am at a bit of a loss when it comes to which monitor is accurate. Tests taken at the same time with new blood from a different site, same finger with new test strips.
Last 8 tests have given me the following readings:

Accensia Contour: --------------9.2----9.6----9.9----7.8----9.3----9.1----7.8----7.1
Accu-Chek Aviva Nano: ------- 8.0----9.0----9.1----6.8----7.9----7.8----6.6----6.3

as you can see the difference in the readings is quite significant, i.e 7.8 against 6.8. 9.3 against 7.9 and 9.1 against 7.8, and as mentioned same time, same finger etc. The Accensia has been tested with solution and Accu-Chek sent me another Aviva Nano to try which gave around the same results as the original Nano. Any thoughts on which monitor is giving me the correct readings?

Regards

Bill

I have just tested myself with 2 different machines and got different readings. I think should just go by 1 and hope it's right
 

Bman626

Newbie
Messages
4
I am in the USA and use the freestyle lite Meter and test strips. It's absolutely great. My results are always the same as when I visit my doctor. The meter has a large display with easy to read data and buttons that are easy to push without making mistakes.
 
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Stephen Bond

Well-Known Member
Messages
234
Type of diabetes
Prediabetes
Treatment type
Non-insulin injectable medication (incretin mimetics)
Dislikes
Bureaucracy. Poor quality. Boredom
Hi... I am new to diabetes ( pre Type2), and just starting to do some research. I really knew absolutely nothing about it before.

I have seen that MMOL is an important figure to check, is there any other check i can make myself?

Also, and now to the point of this post, I checked reviews of monitors on Amazon, and noticed that in the 1 star category, a lot of the most popular monitors had comments that tests taken within a few minutes of each other were vastly different. I can understand that with different monitors but if it is the same monitor that does not inspire any degree of confidence.

I am sure there must be many of you long term testers have actually tested their machine a few times over a few minutes, and found a really reliable monitor that gives consistent correct results.

What are the best monitors you have found? This would be extremely helpful to newbies on this site, like me :)

Thanks in advance for your comments.
 

Oldvatr

Expert
Messages
8,470
Type of diabetes
Type 2
Treatment type
Tablets (oral)
Hi... I am new to diabetes ( pre Type2), and just starting to do some research. I really knew absolutely nothing about it before.

I have seen that MMOL is an important figure to check, is there any other check i can make myself?

Also, and now to the point of this post, I checked reviews of monitors on Amazon, and noticed that in the 1 star category, a lot of the most popular monitors had comments that tests taken within a few minutes of each other were vastly different. I can understand that with different monitors but if it is the same monitor that does not inspire any degree of confidence.

I am sure there must be many of you long term testers have actually tested their machine a few times over a few minutes, and found a really reliable monitor that gives consistent correct results.

What are the best monitors you have found? This would be extremely helpful to newbies on this site, like me :)

Thanks in advance for your comments.
First question. Are you UK based? Mmol/l is how we measure blood glucose in the UK. In the USA and some other countries they use mg/dl instead which is 18 times the mmol/l figure. So make sure you buy the meter from a supplier in your country.

Second point. Meters sold nowadays are controlled by an International standard and have to meet the accuracy requirements of the ISO
This explain your second point and that is that one meter reading the same drop of blood in succession is considered accurate even if the readings differ by 30% so an actual value of 10 mmol/l can be reported as being between 8.5 and 11.5 and be meeting the specification. This applies to all meters, and is the bottom line.

As regards which meter, then some meters have special extra's that some peolpe like such as the ability to measure ketones, or that give better facilities for insulin users. Some meters even talk.

I note you are on an incretin, and these have been associated with a small risk of diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) so the ability to test ketones may be advisable, although wee sticks are a cheaper alternative. My meter has this capablity , but I have not used it. The best advice I can give is to choose a meter with the cheapest test strips, since this is the major cost of bgl testing.
 

Stephen Bond

Well-Known Member
Messages
234
Type of diabetes
Prediabetes
Treatment type
Non-insulin injectable medication (incretin mimetics)
Dislikes
Bureaucracy. Poor quality. Boredom
Thank you so much for your advice. That 30% margin of accuracy seems rather large, but if that is the level of the science i guess that is the only choice. I will do as you recommend. Thank you again.
 
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Stephen Bond

Well-Known Member
Messages
234
Type of diabetes
Prediabetes
Treatment type
Non-insulin injectable medication (incretin mimetics)
Dislikes
Bureaucracy. Poor quality. Boredom
I have just bought a VivaChek monitoring kit. Apparently their accuracy is higher than most + or - 9.5%.It also has a few added features that might be helpful... still new to all this! Also the test strips are a good price.

I will update how good it is once I have given it a good testing!
 

Stephen Bond

Well-Known Member
Messages
234
Type of diabetes
Prediabetes
Treatment type
Non-insulin injectable medication (incretin mimetics)
Dislikes
Bureaucracy. Poor quality. Boredom
View attachment 30379
I used to use this one with my iPhone.
I find the vivachek "Eco Plus BLE" pretty good. It claims to be one of the best for accuracy, the phone app is thorough and the price of the strips are well priced compared to others on Amazon. I trust it more than my Libre3!
 
Messages
15
Type of diabetes
Type 2
Treatment type
Tablets (oral)
Hi. Since the mid-1980s, I've been using various iterations of the Accu-Chek monitors, most recently the Accu-Chek Performa. I can't compare with any other brands, but like all things mechanical, I tend to think that if you stick to the one device (i.e. using the same set of scales to weigh yourself each day), then you'll be better able to compare your own results with your own results - regardless of whether those readings are different from other devices. You can then easily see if your glucose level today is better (or worse) than yesterday's reading.
Currently I can purchase 100 test strips for $A 1.20 using my National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) discount, which is quite reasonable, I think.

According to the Accu-Chek Australian website: "EN ISO 15197:2015 standards require today’s blood glucose meters to be accurate at 15/15.1. That’s a high standard, but what does it mean? At this standard, 95% of results fall within ± 0.83 mmol/L when < 5.55 mmol/L or ± 15% when ≥ 5.55 mmol/L".

I use a different meter (LifeSmart) for Ketone readings, but I only take those readings when I'm feeling "off-colour".

Cheers, DB1.
 

shantijoe

Member
Messages
9
Type of diabetes
Prediabetes
Treatment type
Diet only
I find the vivachek "Eco Plus BLE" pretty good. It claims to be one of the best for accuracy, the phone app is thorough and the price of the strips are well priced compared to others on Amazon. I trust it more than my Libre3!

Hi Stephen, I’m now on my 2nd monitor which manages a reading 1 in 3 attempts so not trustworthy.

It’s a Kinetic sponsored by St John Ambulance which is encouraging but the results are not.

I have to use the highest level to produce enough blood but even then a 1- 3 ration is poor.

I’m looking at the device you’re using and would like to hear how you’re getting on?

Many thanks, joe
 

Stephen Bond

Well-Known Member
Messages
234
Type of diabetes
Prediabetes
Treatment type
Non-insulin injectable medication (incretin mimetics)
Dislikes
Bureaucracy. Poor quality. Boredom
Hi Stephen, I’m now on my 2nd monitor which manages a reading 1 in 3 attempts so not trustworthy.

It’s a Kinetic sponsored by St John Ambulance which is encouraging but the results are not.

I have to use the highest level to produce enough blood but even then a 1- 3 ration is poor.

I’m looking at the device you’re using and would like to hear how you’re getting on?

Many thanks, joe
I really like it. In fact so much that I am going to give up with the Libre3 Constant Glucose Monitor. I am prediabetes so all i am looking for is Glucose levels and alarms if things go too low. This is super easy to use. Takes the tiniest drop of blood, and seems very accurate. No false alarms as with the Libre3.
 
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Tom2023

Newbie
Messages
4
Type of diabetes
Type 2
Treatment type
Diet only
This explain your second point and that is that one meter reading the same drop of blood in succession is considered accurate even if the readings differ by 30% so an actual value of 10 mmol/l can be reported as being between 8.5 and 11.5 and be meeting the specification. This applies to all meters, and is the bottom line.

If you are going to make decisions about your diet and health based on glucose readings then those readings need to be fairly accurate. If the above is true then these monitors would seem next to useless.
 
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Oldvatr

Expert
Messages
8,470
Type of diabetes
Type 2
Treatment type
Tablets (oral)
If you are going to make decisions about your diet and health based on glucose readings then those readings need to be fairly accurate. If the above is true then these monitors would seem next to useless.
They are indeed a broad brush so fine detail is not feasible. They convey a general condition and can be used to detect trends and also rogue meds or diet items. I have successfuly used them to adjust medication dosage and fine tuned my diet but worrying on a daily basis is a waste of energy. I have even detected fake meds with mine, and also discovered that Sukkarto is not a direct replacement for Metformin since the coating on the pills does not dissolve in the same way and the pills were coming out unchanged and my sugar levels rose because I was not benefitting from the substitution to a cheaper brand.

I am not an insulin user, so I am not so dependant on a meter for treatment, but I raise the question - if the meters are useless what else is there? Even the lab testers are +/- 5% and they get calibrated to a titrated solution every day. How much do you trust the speedometer on a car compared to a radar trap? Or your bathroom scales?

I have not mentioned other problems with meters, such as out of date strips, flat batteries, mucky fingers, sugar alcohols and cosmic rays that can affect their accuracy outside of the intrinsic accuracy. I personallly use two meters in parallel and take the average of the readings. This allows me to detect when a meter is faulty or I have a gross misread. As it happens, I am currently awaiting a replacement meter for one that I found was going rogue on me.
 
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catinahat

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,446
Type of diabetes
Type 2
Treatment type
Diet only
Dislikes
Reality tv
If you are going to make decisions about your diet and health based on glucose readings then those readings need to be fairly accurate. If the above is true then these monitors would seem next to useless.
Welcome to the forum @Tom2023
I agree in a perfect world we would all want meters that are accurate to a few decimal places, unfortunately the technology just doesn't exist at the moment. Even so today's meters are preferable to having to pee on a stick and watch it change color, which is all that was available a few decades ago.
And if you think about it any information is more useful than no information, as long as you bear in mind it's limitations.
If your meter gives a result of 6mmol for example, then you know that your actual level is somewhere between 5 and 7 mmol.
A result of 10 on the other hand would mean your range is 8.5 to 11.7
If you had these results when testing a meal, 6 before and 10 2h's later would leave you in no doubt that your meal contained too many carbs.
A 6 before and 7, @ 2hrs you could consider to be in the same range, therefore your meal was perfect.
Without the meter you would have absolutely no idea what your meals were doing to your levels, so not perfectly accurate, but extremely useful