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CHANGES IN DIABETES DETECTION

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by ROSIE555, Jul 24, 2013.

  1. ROSIE555

    ROSIE555 · Newbie

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    hello.

    i am trying to find out about the new test levels for diabetes.

    last years my hubby had his results for the Hb1ac test - but this time they have given him the number 80 from a leaflet from a company called noro nordisk.

    now we are totally confused and a bit sceptical to say the least as we dont trust it when they keep moving the goalposts and 'these new guidelines/levels' are sponsored by a medicine company.

    help please :?
     
  2. Engineer88

    Engineer88 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    As far as Im aware its not sponsored by novo, Its the same number just shown a different way. I havent got a link to the converter im afraid but Im sure there is one on the site.
     
  3. Type2_2000

    Type2_2000 · Well-Known Member

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  4. ROSIE555

    ROSIE555 · Newbie

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    http://eater.com/archives/2012/01/17/paula-deen-announces-diabetes-diagnosis-pharmaceutical-partnership.php

    http://www.drbriffa.com/2009/03/13/are-the-financial-incentives-given-to-uk-doctors-regarding-diabetes-doing-more-harm-than-good/

    some interesting reading......

    i have also been reading that 2 tests are required to confirm diabetes - and OGTT should be offered.



    The corollary of family doctors boosting their practice income by diagnosing as many of their patients as possible with diabetes (to keep the numbers up) is that they can be reluctant to concede that it might also be a curable condition, for two frequently reiterated but dubious reasons. The first is the claim that there is no such thing as “marginal” diabetes. Rather, like pregnancy, you either are or are not diabetic. Next, it is argued that diabetes is a progressive condition that may be controlled by dietary means, but essentially requires medication to prevent any long-term consequences. Diabetes is, in short, a life-long, irreversible illness, hence the need for monitoring.
    This, however, may not be the case, as suggested by the experience of a reader diagnosed as having diabetes following a routine blood test that showed “a slightly raised blood sugar level”. He ignored the official dietary advice to stick to a low-fat diet in favour of consuming lots of meat, fish, wine and vegetables. When the time came for his first annual review, he had lost several kilos and his sugar levels were now well within the normal range. When he suggested to the nurse that his dietary regime might have “cured” his condition, she responded that he was only managing it successfully – and thus must continue with his regular check-ups.
    This policy may help sustain the practice income, but can have financial penalties for the patients, as the necessity to declare medical conditions when applying for car or travel insurance inevitably drives up the premiums.
    -------

    Email medical questions confidentially to [email protected] Answers will be published every Friday at telegraph.co.uk/health

    i am not happy to just take the information from the surgery that is on leaflets from Noro etc etc - and other medical companies etc at face value - it is right to question these things.

    to be honest it is difficult to believe much of what we are being fed - the government are all liars and the medical profession is under alot of scrutiny along with all the nhs scandals lately - my own sister dying in a hospital through neglect last january....and she was a staff nurse. the horror stories she told me about what really goes on.....and the cover ups!

    it just stinks that the details here about diabetes levels being changed and doctors being paid etc - this cannot be right.

    i am going to get two blood tests done for my husband privately and the OGTT tests - and then we will see but we are not prepared to just take the docs word for it after only ONE blood test result.
     
  5. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    I understand your worry about insurance etc though I believe most people with T2 don't report an immediate increase in insurance, it's different for those of us with T1 or those with T2 who use insulin. In the long term though high glucose levels are insidious, people may not feel any symptoms but they will be causing damage. However, by taking control of things people can reduce glucose levels and reduce the complication risk considerably. You will find many on here who have been able to do exactly that.

    The Hba1c is a marker of glucose levels over the previous 2-3months. The threshold level for a diagnosis of diabetes is 48mmol/mol This would reflect an average glucose level of 7.8mmol/l.
    An Hba1c of 80mml/mol (9.5% ) reflects an average glucose level of 12.5mmol/l. This is higher than any normal glucose level (normal levels would be considered to be below 38mmol/mol, )
    see converter: http://www.diabetes.co.uk/hba1c-units-converter.html
    It would be normal to repeat the test in a month or so if the person has no symptoms but as you can see 80mmol/mol is not borderline.
    To answer your implied question about using this method for diagnosis.
    This leaflet describes the introduction of HbA1c as a diagnostic test in the UK. You can see a list of the people involved in the decision.
    http://www.acb.org.uk/docs/Article%20Su ... e%20251111[1].pdf
    As you will see this follows from a World Health Organisation report that recommended this
    this the full report from the WHO
    http://www.who.int/diabetes/publication ... c_2011.pdf
     
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