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Changes In Lockdown Rules for those with a Medical Need.

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Carlton1512, Apr 10, 2020.

  1. Carlton1512

    Carlton1512 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  2. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    Interesting.
    There are plenty of ways to exercise without leaving home https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/the-prisoner-workout/
    So I don’t see that leaving home to exercise is a necessity.
    It is very pleasant, and allows people to maintain established running and walking habits, but I think the exercise argument is weak.

    the article linkedin the OP seems to be focussing more on mental health - Autism, depression, etc.
    That seems to be a stronger argument, but each case is going to be unique. I don’t think ‘I have diabetes, so the rules don’t apply to me’ would work.

    I do think there is a definite need for fresh air and sunlight - but not every day. Not everyone has south facing windows. Mind you it would be a rare flat that couldn’t open at least some windows.

    Personally, I think most humans are extremely adaptable, and just because we can’t do our usual stuff at the moment, doesn’t mean we can’t be active and engaged - we just have to come up with different ways to use the same muscles.

    - if people abuse the current exercise rules (like they did in London parks last weekend, leading to some park closures and police enforcement) then the Lockdown will get tighter - and then we will all lose out. And IMHO the ones who will suffer the most won’t be humans - they will be dogs.
     
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    #2 Brunneria, Apr 10, 2020 at 10:21 AM
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2020
  3. Carlton1512

    Carlton1512 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Diabetes can have a massive impact on mental health and wellbeing. I know once I've been out for once a day cycle/dog run I feel so much better for it and it helps with my glucose levels. Just for clarification, I'm not implying we bend the rules in anyway but curious what peoples opinions are on the change. I'm lucky I have a garden and turbo trainer if I need more exercise, but I know for those stuck in flats it's different for them.
     
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  4. searley

    searley Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Also in law there is no limit to how often you can leave the home in 1 day... you can however only leave once a day for exercise.. but then you could go to the shop.. then later you could go to the pharmacy.. and so on..

    It comes down to having a valid and essential need
     
  5. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    Not even that. The actual legislation in England says you are allowed to leave alone or with members of your household for exercise. No number of times etc mentioned. Anything that says this is guidance not law. However I am not suggesting we all go out indiscriminately or abuse it or get us locked down tighter.
     
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    #5 HSSS, Apr 10, 2020 at 3:12 PM
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2020
  6. Japes

    Japes LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Much as I would like to maintain my normal 2 - 3 hours a day of walking outside spread out across the day, for the sake of my blood sugars and mental health. I'd rather minimise my possible contact with other people right now. That walking is normally spread out between my usual walks to and from work as well as errands as well as regular days full of walking.

    It's been a useful time of experimenting with other exercise options and insulin ratios. I will be glad to return to pre-lock down norms of it all though.
     
  7. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It’s more to do with those with diagnosed mental health and learning difficulties than “good for our mental or physical health” my GP phoned me yesterday because my son has autism, PTSD, severe anxiety and depression - she said the changes covers those who would find it difficult to walk or exercise in a place that has people or things that distress them, it’s also to cover those who haven’t the mental capacity to understand social distancing etc so that they can exercise safely in place away from people. Or for those that may need to go out to exercise more than once a day to if it’s needed for their or their carers safety e.g. a walk would prevent a meltdown or breakdown.

    she said it covers if you have to further than local for these things and if we wanted there is a letter available to show to police etc if you are stopped whilst driving to a place to walk or exercise

    My son has a dog phobia and loves the shore which is dog free so we used to take him a lot but had to stop when lockdown started as we have to drive there. His mental health has deteriorated to a critical level so it’s great for us that we can at least get out with him again.

    people like my son are on the vulnerable list not because they are at greater risk of COVID 19 but for the fact that they wouldn’t be hospitalised if they needed care because the behavioural issues and managing of them and not being allowed the primary Carer to be with them, this scares the life out of me
     
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  8. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    I don’t think the guidance changed. It has always been permissible to leave home during lockdown for ‘medical need’. The message yesterday was just a clarification of what that might mean.

    For me exercise helps a bit with diabetes control, but in a very small way compared to what I consume. However, it is very important for my emotional wellbeing, but so is staying fit and healthy. Like @Japes I’d love to be out and about several times a day on my normal walking schedule, but that’s simply not possible.

    My way of managing is to set out as early as possible in the morning - on work days (I’m working from home during the lockdown) that means during darkness. That way I can enjoy the walking safe in the knowledge that I won’t be bumping into many other people and walk a decent distance without breaching social distancing rules. Later in the day it becomes difficult to enjoy walking - living in a congested part of London, there are many folks living in small spaces (including me) who want to go out for air. While it’s not a problem in terms of the 2 metre rule the act of ‘dodging’ others dominates the walk and takes away from the emotional feel good factor.

    I dread restrictions being made tougher in this area so don’t want to play any part in that happening. Aside from a love of walking it’s been key to me dealing with a recent case of sciatica - initially walking was the only time I wasn’t in pain. Hopefully now if exercise is banned or further restricted I have enough movement to carry out weight bearing exercise at home: something that would have been impossible 3 weeks ago.


    Edited for typo
     
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    #8 Goonergal, Apr 10, 2020 at 3:48 PM
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2020
  9. jane1950

    jane1950 · Well-Known Member

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    I would have thought diabetics would be included, as I find that when I get up, it helps to go for a walk, before I inject, and then I take a longer walk in the afternoon
     
  10. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It’s specific conditions like learning difficulties or autism, the ordinary man on the street can still go out for a walk/exercise once a day if they stick to the guidelines. I agree walking or exercise benefits everyone of us and the majority of the population including us diabetics still have that choice, some of the population haven’t been able to do that at MASSIVE detriment to theirs and others well being and this clarification by the government addresses this.

    I for one am very grateful for it after the last few days we’ve had with my son, having to get the mental health crisis team on 2 occasions and sleepless nights on suicide watch knowing all the while a drive in the care and let off steam on a deserted beach would go some way to alleviate this stress for him or at least make it more manageable for us caring for him on our own 24/7
     
  11. jane1950

    jane1950 · Well-Known Member

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    The one I have just read says adults and children with mental health and autism, my daughter suffers with mental health, as she has panic attacks and agoraphobia, which means she still has to continue her exposure therapy , which means sometimes she gets the need to go out again, and somebody else also put something on saying you can go out for medical needs, well a diabetic with a high blood glucose level would be a medical need, as exercise would be a good way to bring the levels down
     
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  12. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    You could be amazed how efficient going up and down the stairs a few times is in reducing blood glucose.

    If you have a garden skipping or laps would likely achieve the same.
     
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  13. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well you get round it to get your extra exercise by accompanying her on her need to get out ;) - I disagree about reducing blood sugar though that can be done by exercise in the home, I live in a bungalow so no stairs but I have a step that I do stepping exercise on every day. Lots of people doing “classes” for free everyday on YouTube etc during the lockdown. Joe wicks is one who springs to mind that covers all ages and abilities. Not criticising you just giving some alternatives that could be helpful :)
     
  14. jane1950

    jane1950 · Well-Known Member

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    I find the walk better for lowering glucose levels, but my daughter also needs support when she is feeling anxious, as I used to have to go into town with her before, and it took a while for her to go alone,
     
  15. jane1950

    jane1950 · Well-Known Member

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    I prefer a walk, going up and downstairs is going to wear my carpet too much, and I wouldnt be able to afford a new one as have other things to buy, but I can use medical needs if I need to go for a walk
     
  16. hyponilla

    hyponilla Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just saw this brilliant video of outdoor exercise while maintaining social distance. Also makes grocery delivery easier :)
     
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