1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Conflicting data on 'type' & foods

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Nosgirl, Dec 12, 2020.

  1. Nosgirl

    Nosgirl Type 2 · Newbie

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi All

    I have recently been diagnosed Type 2, but only take a statin and no other meds for it (at least for now). Insulin resistance was briefly mentioned so that might be my 'type' if that's a thing. I'm still working out which part of the forum is 'for me'. My home sugar test was 7.8 before eating anything this morning. The machine seems to say that's 'orange'. Which part of this forum is best for me to be part of?

    My food question is: from many different recipe websites and diabetes information locations I've found so far, many give conflicting Carb numbers on what foods are 'ok'. Varying from carrots is ok to not ok. Wholewheat bread or pasta is ok or not. Basmati rice is the best/worst rice to use for the lowest carbs. Is there a reliable location for finding what carbs/sugars foods contain?
     
    #1 Nosgirl, Dec 12, 2020 at 7:02 PM
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2020
  2. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,398
    Likes Received:
    18,802
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi @Nosgirl and welcome to the forum.

    You’re right, things can be confusing when you’re first diagnosed. I’ll try and answer some of your questions below.


    Insulin resistance is common in people with type 2. Unlike those with type 1, who make little, if any, of their own insulin, type2s often make too much of it as their body is no longer so sensitive to its effects, hence the rise in blood sugars. There is an excellent book by Dr Jason Fung - the diabetes code - which explains this.
    Any part that interests you. The sections on type 2 diabetes and also the various forums on diet - you mention something about this - and specifically the low carb forum, would be good starting points.
    Supermarket websites are pretty good. There’s also an excellent website called dietdoctor.com which has some infographics which show carb content for common foods, as well as being full of food and recipe ideas.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Winner Winner x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  3. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,394
    Likes Received:
    2,664
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Type 2 would appear to be your type. That is fundamentally people with insulin resistance. Ie they have to produce more and more insulin to bring their blood sugars down to normal, because it’s not as effective as it should be ie resistant, until eventually they can’t and blood sugars go up. In simple terms traditionally treatment has been to increase the insulin levels til it does work by medication. More recently common sense has begun to be listened to and keeping the need for insulin lower is becoming more common and more effective approach. As glucose is the trigger for insulin and glucose comes largely from carbs that’s why we reduce them.

    as to which carbs and by how much it’s a bit personal. Some manage to achieve their goals at around 150g per day. Others need to stay under 20g. Some “experts” are talking about lower carb where carrots etc are probably ok. Others are strict “clean keto” and ban almost any carbs at all. None have the final word. You simply have to pick the version that’s right for you.

    Depends on lots of things. Insulin resistance, weight, activity, other metabolic factors etc etc the concept of GI does kind of address this. The idea of eating brown or wholemeal stems from this under the belief the extra fibre in these items slows down the sugar spike and makes it a longer slower hump instead. However the carbs are all still there and personally I don’t like the idea of that much either, as many in here and experts out there agree.

    take a look at the links in my signature below for more details and further links.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,433
    Likes Received:
    832
    Trophy Points:
    173
    Hello and welcome,

    Yes it can be difficult when first diagnosed to work out what advice to follow- it can be both stressful and upsetting.

    First- congratulations on finding this site. This site has literally thousands of people who have been where you are. I'm a type 2- so insulin resistant- intolerant to carbs. For me I keep my carbs under 20 grams a day. I did this to lower my blood sugar levels as quickly as possible and also to try to reduce my insulin resistance. It has also had the side effect of lost ng weight.

    Second - my initial advice would be to get a meter. Most doctors do not recommend them for us type 2s but for me I wanted to do something about my diagnosis and I needed information to do it. If I don't know what different food does to my blood sugar levels then it is not possible to lower them in a systematic way.

    Once you have a meter test on waking and before meals and 2 hours afterwards. The rise will tell you how your body tolerated that meal- you are looking for a rise of less than 2.

    I found that vastly reducing my carb intake has brought my levels into the normal range and also has made me lose weight without counting calories.

    A useful link is:
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/blog-entry/the-nutritional-thingy.2330/

    Good luck and welcome.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. rosemaree

    rosemaree Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Hello @Nosgirl,

    I also found it confusing at first, and some things a bit extreme. I am plant based and eat a lot more carbs than most people here, but I find the foods affect everyone differently. I am still trying to figure things out. The dietician recommended I stick to low GI foods, so whole wheat pasta, brown rice, etc. But I find, while pasta doesn't affect me, I can have whole wheat or white and it doesn't make much of a difference, I can't eat rice, doesn't matter what kind, it sends my sugar levels higher than I am comfortable with.

    It is a bit trail and error, but testing to see the effect each food has really helps you figure out what you can and can't eat.

    Good luck :cat:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Donought

    Donought · Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Hi Nosgirl,

    I'm the same, newly diagnosed but only as insulin resistant, but I suspect that may change. I've found this site so helpful and everyone is so generous with their knowledge. I've been finger prick testing but have just bought a couple of libres CGM. My blood sugar is all over the place so I figured it's a good idea to have a constant record. For example, yesterday I ate a teeny tiny portion of rice, some quorn chicken, soup, broccoli and cheese dish (sounds much nicer than it really is :)) and I went from 5.4 to 9.5. I ran out of test strips and the 9.5 was only at 30 mins. Then the other day I was 7.7 after breakfast and it it didn't drop below 7.2 at 3 hrs later. My fingertips are so sore and I'm a bit of a data nut so I want to see how individual foods are affecting me as well as combinations so this seemed a sensible way to go.

    I am also trying low carb but as I'm more or less plant based (ok maybe less), much like rosemaree, I eat any veg I want irrespective of carb content but can't manage rice or pasta. I am still eating a small amount of oats but I think these too may have to go for a while.

    I guess it's all about finding out how we react to different foods and tailoring it to our own needs. @rosemaree are you plant based for health? I'm struggling with the different experts finding that plant based low fat helps diabetes and meat is killing you then on the other hand low carb meat eating also helps, as evidenced on here. I'm just so confused so!!
     
  7. Nosgirl

    Nosgirl Type 2 · Newbie

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    ------------
    Hi Hope this is how to reply.

    Does plant-based mean vegetarian?
     
  8. rosemaree

    rosemaree Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    48
    @Donought it is a bit of a combination - I have never been a big meat eater and was largely vegetarian - one who didn't eat many vegetables. I tried LCHF after being diagnosed but didn't like how it made me feel so changed to plant based, I do really well on it when I stick to eating 95% whole food plant based (I say 95% in relation to the whole foods as I still have the occasional processed product - store bought veggie burgers, tofu, plant milk, bread, vegan mayo, etc), but I battle with emotional and stress eating and it is very easy for me to fall into eating 'unhealthy vegan' foods, which are terrible for glucose levels.
    I do also have an ethical inclination, but I don't agree with the way it is used now - I think everything we eat and do should be ethical without having to label it so - I choose organic, sustainable, in season fruits and veg as much as I can, and I buy free range, ethical meats for my little dog. It makes me sad that consumerism runs the world - no would want to buy it if it was labelled unethical chicken, chemically grown spinach or slave labour chocolate.

    But to answer your question, I made the change to plant based because of diabetes, but the health side and the ethical side support each other for me. Eating plant based makes me feel good and healthy, and it makes it easier to make ethical choices. And when I am battling to eat healthy foods, ethics reminds me that I'm not only eating this way for myself.

    I was overwhelmed by the opposing opinions of the experts when I was first diagnosed, but I don't think there is a one size fits all answer, although there always seems to be this pressure to pick a side. But there are little gems of information buried in all the opinion that are really worthwhile!

    @Nosgirl for me plant based means eating a diet that consists mostly of plant foods, you could still consume animal products but it would be a rare or occasional thing. When I was vegetarian I ate dairy, eggs and mostly processed foods!
     
  9. Donought

    Donought · Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Thanks Rosemaree - thanks so much for you reply. I am very similar to you in terms of being veggie now plant based. I have become less plant based in the past few weeks since being told I'm insulin resistant and low in iron etc. but have to say I'm not a huge meat eater and never was. I don't think I've had a meat based meal for years but perhaps the odd nibble of something leftover on a plate. So for me I am a whole food plant based flexitarian that eats cheese and the odd mouthful or organic steak :) You're so right in terms of gems of info buried in all sides, it's just exhausting to find them but I guess we are all individual so there's a lot of trial and error.

    It's so true about food being politicised and everything is turned into a 'good' or 'bad' choice and we're forced to decide, very little grey left anymore.

    I've ordered a couple of libre CGM's so I'm going to do a bit of experimenting over Christmas, when I will likely eat a range of foods and see what happens to my body and how I feel.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook