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Daughter 8 Newly diagnosed type 1

Discussion in 'Parents' started by Ourpheebs, Jun 19, 2019.

  1. Ourpheebs

    Ourpheebs · Newbie

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    Hi, my little girl has just been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. I am really struggling to come to terms with it. I feel very tearful and I am scared about everything. I don’t feel I have anyone who understands or that I can talk to. In front of her I just smile on our on a brave face. Really looking for some support. Everything just seems so daunting.
     
    • Hug Hug x 2
  2. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello, welcome! Sending your daughter and you lots of hugs. My mum was in a similar way when I was diagnosed at the same age as your daughter. She was and still is the strongest woman I know. Your daughter will have the right team, education and you to support her. You and her are not alone. You shouldn’t be too worried, diabetes doesn’t bite back if it’s fed well, looked after and has the right amount of insulin on board.
     
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  3. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    @Ourpheebs ... Don't be tearful, nor scared. Hundreds here that have worked thru the same thing.

    She will depend on you and you on us. Have faith in that. :)
     
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  4. Victoria King

    Victoria King Parent · Newbie

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    Hello! I am mum to two type 1s. My little girl was diagnosed 6 months ago, aged 9 and my son 2 months ago, aged 14. It is nearly 3 in the morning and I am sitting up waiting to test my daughter again as she is riding high and not responding to insulin correction... :arghh::sour::dead: Sending you and your daughter many positive vibes... I expect she is dealing with it wonderfully. It is a huuuuuuuge pain in the backside and you probably really didn't need it but you'll be an expert in no time and there are loads of people happy to share tips, help out and offer support online. First time I posted on a Facebook forum, I got 15 really detailed replies from people in a couple of hours. It was really helpful. Good luck!
     
  5. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You will notice that your post has been placed (or placed by you) in the Parents forum.
    That allows others will the most revelant experience to touch base here with you.

    For person/patient and parent(s) the diagnosis of diabetes is a shocker but it is survivable. The challenge is getting through it and posting on this site is a courageous and important step for you to make. Not everybody seeks the help they need, but you have.

    When I was diagnosed at age 13 I recall being less worried than my parents were. A bit like, what I did not know or understand could not hurt me.. Not a long term strategy of course but a useful one at that moment in time.
    My parents worried for me - but I knew that was uncomfortable for them. It was the fact that they found a way to support me, a way of working as a team with me that really helped us all.
    They and I read about diabetes, sought out information, found some routines which I could try out with food and injections, ways to identify hypos, treat them and try to anticipate and prevent them.

    All this started for me 52 years ago. Back when there were only 2 basic styles of insulin available, before disposable syringes/needles, when only urine testing was available.

    What is available now for your daughter is a wealth of knowledge, technological advances and support such as this forum and others, parent support groups, young diabetics groups, other organisations. There are more health professionals and they work as a team, not individuals as back in my first days, months and years.

    Asking for help and support also means not being afraid to ask what might seem the most basic or simplest of questions. The thing is that we have all been there at some point - not sure of something, but feeling that we needed an answer to be able to progress to the next step in understanding, or for reassurance.

    Involve members of your family who you feel wish to be involved. They, you and your daughter will need knowledge and this site has plenty on the Home Page, such as on the horizontal menu: e.g. Type 1 diabetes (TID for short), Living with diabetes etc.
    Try to seek out things for you and your daughter and others in your 'home team' like Blood sugar ranges, hypoglycaemia first as priorities and expand out as and when you can.
    Information overload is a potential risk at first but as others have said as you acquire knowledge and your confidence grows things will become easier.

    Humour and use of it is an important part of learning and coping. I used to call injection time: "javelin practice". Hypos were occasions, though not pleasant, when eating a sweet or three was permissible. ( finding something positive in the midst of peril)
    I heard of a family where the husband and son would bet on what the diabetic mum's blood sugar level (BSL) would be before dinner, and the loser did the washing up.

    Believe in yourself, rest when you can. Becoming unwell yourself serves no-one well. Remember that the Chinese word for "crisis" is the same word meaning "opportunity".

    And let your daughter know when you think right that there Type 1 diabetics on this site who have lived 30, 40 50 , 60 years on insulin. My endocrinologist here in Australia greets all his newly diagnosed TID patients with the advice to ensure they obtain a good normal age retirement plan once they enter the workforce.

    Best Wishes and please keep asking questions and sharing concerns.:):):)

    Nothing..................It is all about ..............Ask for help when .........Not every day.........Relax when you
    is impossible...........balance..........................you need it.................. will be perfect........are able to
    P4220867.jpg .................. P4220890.jpg ............ IMG_4174.jpg ............. P3310263.jpg .......... IMG_4188.jpg
     
  6. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    Hi,

    & welcome to the forum @Ourpheebs , & @Victoria King .

    I was diagnosed on my 8th birthday. As youngsters we adapt to it as "one of those things."
    Yep, I detected an undercurrent & felt not all was disclosed on this new "thing."
    It's a learning curve for you & the youngster, if you can afford a little independance down the line as things settle? You won't go far wrong.
    I'm headbutting 51 now & the "role" has reversed with my elderly mum & all that comes with that. It's all "circle of life" stuff..

    You'll both do brilliantly. & so will the kids.
     
  7. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    Get those tears out @Ourpheebs anyone would cry at the shock and worry for their child. Once all the emotion is worked through learn as much as you can, work with the medics and let your little girl fly.
    We all know the horrors stories about diabetes but tech and treatment today make it easier and there is no reason for her not to live a long, healthy, happy life.
     
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