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Define hypo unawareness?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by becks92, Jan 22, 2016.

?

Are you hypo unaware if you are, for the majority, excellent at spotting hypos and completely aware?

Poll closed Jan 29, 2016.
  1. Yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. No

    100.0%
  3. I don't know

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. becks92

    becks92 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi there.

    Just having a thought. I, occasionally, have hypos that I detect at 3.6, 3.4 etc. However, I have some that I don't until I get to 2.1 or 2.4. Now, sometimes that is because I am busy doing stuff (working etc) and sometimes I can sense it but I don't want to check in, other times I just can't tell until the time I test...here is the question:

    Are you hypo unaware if you are, for the majority, excellent at spotting hypos and completely aware?
     
  2. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

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    Your thread title and question isn't making sense and somewhat confusing @becks92, can you explain further what you are asking.
     
  3. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Define hypo unawareness- being unaware of hypoglycemia

    [End Thread]
     
  4. onthegow

    onthegow · Well-Known Member

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    I have had a hypo tonight 2.8. I usually catch them at 3.8 or so. I also get itchy ears at around 5. Tonight the first I had a feeling something was not right was swimming head. I think you become unaware from my perspective when you need help or end up in hospital. Just a thought from time to time I get ninja hypo. That's how I refer to them. Sorry not able to define what your topic is asking.
     
  5. yingtong

    yingtong Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have hypo unawareness and I don't recognise any signs of a hypo.
     
  6. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't think you can be unaware if you are completely aware. They are mutually exclusive states.

    Do you mean - are you hypo unaware if you occasionally go low with no symptoms, but most of the time you do get warnings?

    I'm not really sure of the answer to be honest, I would have thought that you probably wouldn't be classed as hypo unaware if usually you do get warnings. But if you are having some episodes where you aren't aware then hypo unawareness would definitely be something to be conscious of. The less you go hypo, the less likely you are to lose awareness - diabetes.co.uk does run a hypo course with lots of good information if you are concerned about losing awareness - it's free online/email thing.

    I have no hypo awareness, so I definitely am in no position to teach anyone anything. But, the way it was explained to me was when you drop your body releases adrenaline & it's the adrenaline which causes the hypo symptoms, but if your body gets used to you being low it will think being low is normal, so there will be no reason for it to release any adrenaline. If you want to keep your awareness, you should resist the temptation to ignore the signs and not treat. I'm well aware that's often easier said than done, but maybe you could try and do things to make it as easy as possible for yourself to treat a hypo even while you are in the middle of something at work - keep dextrose tablets in your desk drawers etc?

    The only hypo symptom I get now is when I go very low - <2.3 - that is pronounced facial numbness. That's not really a hypo symptom, it's caused because my brain is so deprived of sugar it cannot function properly to sense my nose & lips are still attached to my face. I don't recommend letting it go that far, so try the hypo course instead :) x
     
  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Mmmmm. "Define hypo unawareness".

    I've been diabetic for nearly 40 years.. Even as a child I have woken & treated my own "events"..
    The day I need an ambulance or wake up dead? You can pin that label on me. ;)
     
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  8. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    On the very day I completed the hypo awareness course here on DCUK, I went and bought a pak of dextrose tabs, then promptly had my first hypo, My levels dropped from 10.8 down to 2.1 within 1 hour of eating a substantial meal, so I was surprised. I had none of the expected warning symptoms, but did get visual disturbance which I now use as my get up and go signal. I remained fully in control and was able to deal with it on my own, But it was not how I had expected it to be.
     
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