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Diabetes and benefits

Discussion in 'Benefits' started by Debs1960, May 22, 2015.

  1. Angela_T

    Angela_T Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks CarbRok it is effecting me physically and mentally. Found out today I have Gasroparesis where your stomach does not digest food properly and it sticks in the stomach lining as well when is the long list ever going to end of health issues and pain. Angela T
     
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  2. petdell

    petdell Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Having worked for 44 years, 30 of those as a type 1 diabetic . My eyesight deteriorated rapidly. Peripheral vision loss and cataract in my left eye and hypo problems ,I claimed ESA, at the medical assessment I was told they weren't interested in my diabetes just my sight problems. I received ESA for 12 months then because I hadn't been placed in the support group it was terminated. I appealed ,but to late so they weren't interested despite loads of supporting paperwork. Some weeks later I received an appointment for another assessment. My initial reaction was stuff you, I'm not receiving any benefits why bother. Phoned work s and pensions asking why I had been asked to go and was told it was about them paying my national insurance stamp so I went, saw a very nice assessor, who couldn't believe the previous ladies attitude to diabetes. Explained my hypos and asked if she had ever witnessed a hypo. (About two weeks ago she said) turned out her friend was type 1. A few weeks later my benefit was reinstated. Now in receipt of my OAP. Got to be T1 live with one or close friend of T1 to understand lol
     
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  3. Elliehowell

    Elliehowell Type 1 · Member

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    You should be able to claim for the uc. As you need to visit a loo at short notice and can also be incontinent. You could try for pip as this is for that type of illness. Good luck xx
     
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  4. PatsyB

    PatsyB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    never claimed any benefit ...worked all my life have Diabetes 2 for five years and worked till I was 70...do not think they will give me anything so never tried...good luck to those that do claim...
     
  5. zebs

    zebs Type 1 · Active Member

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    There is no harm in contacting PIP and applying. They will send you a form and you must give as much information how you feel on good and bad days. They will decide if you are entitled or not. Diabetes by itself is unlikely to be enough. However if not fit to work apply for ESA
     
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  6. richyb

    richyb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I once asked the inland revenue if an allowance could be made as I have to purchase glucose tablets for hypos. They said if they only if not available on prescription. I left it at that because I think Hypo stops are available. Seems wrong though that the tablets are taxed heavily and I do not buy them for fun.
    type 1 for 50years
     
  7. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You should be able to get the VAT back I would have thought.
     
  8. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    VAT exemption example
    For example, a tub of GlucoTabs may not be considered to be totally diabetes related as they may be taken by athletes or sports-people to boost their energy.

    However, an item such as test strips can not possibly be used by anyone else other than for the purpose of testing their blood sugar, which is a diabetes related purpose.

    For this reason, test strips are exempt from VAT and GlucoTabs are not.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/vat-exemption.html
     
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  9. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    As @catherinecherub has said, unfortunately you can't avoid paying vat on dextrose tablets. I looked into it before and was most disappointed to find it wasn't an option!
     
  10. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    There is an option to cut VAT to 5 per cent though and increase income tax.
     
  11. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That's interesting, haven't seen anything like that before (possibly because I'm on PAYE?). Would you be able to explain a bit more please or point me in the right direction of where to look for more info on this - I did a little Google search, but have to confess I'm not really sure what I'm looking for so came up empty!
     
  12. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It's a political question really. Taxation is loaded onto VAT because it's a hidden stealth tax which people don't realise they are paying. Under EU regulations VAT could be reduced to 5 pc. But an increase in income tax to pay for the cut would be obvious to everybody. It would be fairer though. Income tax in progressive; VAT is regressive.
     
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  13. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ah, that explains why I was confused then. Thanks for clarifying.
     
  14. PatsyB

    PatsyB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think diabetes is a disablitiy it stops me doing many things like going for a walk unless i test my levels , driving again I have to test levels before going anywhere.... and when I have a hypo my hubby gets into action and gets me things to eat to raise the level again...
     
  15. Ultramum

    Ultramum Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) defines a disabled person as someone who has a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

    The DDA sets out the circumstances under which a person is 'disabled'. A person is considered to be disabled if:
    • They have a mental or physical impairment
    • The impairment has an adverse effect on their ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities
    • The adverse effect is substantial and long-term (meaning it has lasted for 12 months, or is likely to last for more than 12 months or for the rest of the person's life).
    DLA can be claimed for children up until the age of 16 - the award is based on whether the child "requires substantially more guidance or supervision from another person than persons of his age in normal physical and mental health would require" for the mobility award and, regarding care needs, "has requirements of a description mentioned in the condition substantially in excess of the normal requirements of persons of his age" - so problems with diabetic control or monitoring blood glucose would be more likely to lead to an award - depends on how substantial they are.

    PIP is for post 16 and can be claimed whether you are in work or not, although your ability to work may have some bearing on your assessment. You must have a long-term health condition or disability and face difficulties with ‘daily living’ or getting around.

    You must have had these difficulties for 3 months (at the date of claim) and expect them to last for at least 9 months.

    You are assessed on 10 Daily Living Activities and 2 Mobility Activities. Some relate to physical problems and others to mental health and cognitive problems. You can score points if you need aids to help with activities (although the scoring on some activities is going to change from January 2017 regarding the use of aids - less points).

    You telephone to make a claim and then are sent a form to complete. This is followed by a face to face assessment of your disabilities, then a decision is made. Although the form asks for details of your doctors and consultants they are unlikely to be contacted by the DWP so send in copies of any letters, tests and other evidence you want to be considered with the form - otherwise it will not be considered.

    Once a decision is made you can ask for a mandatory reconsideration if you disagree - if you have any extra evidence now is the time to send it in.

    If you still disagree after a mandatory reconsideration then you can appeal to the Tribunal - independent body who review the evidence and the law and decide if the DWP made the decision correctly. You can choose to attend or have it decided just on the papers. You are more likely to get a decision overturned if you attend. It's nerve wracking but the panel don't bite!

    Hope this helps to clarify the process.

    Daily living scores (until Jan 17) are here: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2013/377/schedule/1/part/2/made
    Mobility scores are here: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2013/377/schedule/1/part/3/made

    Edited: You need 8 points in Daily Living to get a standard award of PIP and 12 points to get the enhanced award. The same goes for Mobility.
     
  16. PatsyB

    PatsyB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Never applied for any benefit in my life and at 70 I dont think they will give me any now, my mum is 90 and she wont apply for anything iether ...I wish she would apply for a disability badge so i can park near the hospitals etc when i take her anywhere.....luckily my brother has one for his wife so I pass that duty onto him these days....
    Yes am Diabetic and when my levels drop my husband is there to get me something quick...with out him I woudl be lost i think :)
     
  17. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Don't you get the State Retirement Pension and Winter Heating Allowance @PatsyB?
     
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  18. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    And free prescriptions and eye tests as you're over 60.

    As OAPs we do actually get a number of benefits without having to ask for them. (Though I like to consider mine as "Long Service Entitlements" for having worked and paid my taxes for a good 40 years...:D

    Robbity
     
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  19. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    @Robbity Also free public transport. But we do have to apply for the pension, heating allowance and free travel pass, but not for free prescriptions and eye tests.
     
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