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Diabetes and the Armed Forces

Discussion in 'Jobs and Employment' started by SootieSteve, Jun 29, 2017.

  1. SootieSteve

    SootieSteve Type 1 · Member

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    Hi, just been diagnosed Type 1. I've been in the Armed Forces (Royal Marines) for the last 25 years.

    Are there any other servicemen/women out there that have been diagnosed whilst serving?? If so, were you medically discharged or allowed to continue to serve??

    I look forward to hearing from you
     
  2. Kenners

    Kenners Type 1 · Member

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    Hi Sooty,
    I know an ex-Royal who got type one about 10 years ago. Wanted to stay in, but ended up with a medical discharge after all the medical/ employability boards. The pusser will generally discharge type 1s from what I've read; certainly you couldn't join up with it. I hope I'm wrong and you get to stay in the corps.
     
  3. SootieSteve

    SootieSteve Type 1 · Member

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    Cheers @Kenners.

    That's the general perception I'm getting. The MO phoned me whilst still on a drip in hospital to tell me the same, but I hope in this day and age there is scope to retain me.

    Thanks for your advice mate
     
  4. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Moderator
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    I recall another member who was diagnosed whilst in the army. The feedback he was given was that if they could find him a role that wasn't front line/deployed (essentially a desk job) they may be able to retain him, but as you can understand, it's too much of a risk to have a T1 on the front line with potential limited access to supplies and the risk of hypo being a liability to the team with which they are operating when in hostile conditions. Good luck!
     
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  5. EllsKBells

    EllsKBells Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    When I did my carb counting course, there was a T1 there who'd been in the air force, but was medically discharged upon diagnosis.

    Best of luck!
     
  6. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Do you like training people, if so, the TA etc may have a job you can do? Likewise any UK based training post for the Marines or army. The RAF also have people who guard UK airfields and never get deployed.

    The concept of you having to choose between getting a hypo or taking a break to eat while under fire is just unthinkable...... (hence the forces rules)
     
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  7. MartinK9

    MartinK9 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thankyou for your service.
     
  8. copepod

    copepod Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    One of the main concerns, in addition to risk of hypos, is the supply line for essential medication ie insulin. Obviously, food, ammunition etc are also essential for armed forces, but an exact bullet or item of food doesn't need to be sent to every individual serviceperson. I had resigned from a TA medical unit in order to travel, then was diagnosed when working overseas, so became not able to continue with my job, so with no work permit, I couldn't stay in New Zealand, had to return to UK, find new career etc. Rejoining TA was not open to me in 1996.
    I hope things might have improved by now.
     
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  9. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I very briefly looked at joining the RAF reserves, simply to get some other form of training (and potentially a different career) during my time off from my actual job.

    After looking online at their medical criteria, I soon found out that it wasn't an option as a T1.

    Good luck and I hope you find the answer you seek. Failing that, I hope you find alternative employment:)
     
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  10. Tom.thomas61

    Tom.thomas61 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi Steve,

    I was in the Welsh guards for 5 years. I found out I was diabetic 2 years after finishing training. Unfortunately I was told I was to be medical discharged but this took a further 3 years to happen. This was mainly due to them trying to find suitable roles to put me into, but was also at the time of many redundancies across the board.

    I'm unsure if the marines(or any of the forces) are trying to retain soldiers these days but there is a possibility they will offer you a recruiting role to keep you in a bit longer.

    If things do go down the medical discharge route, find out what your entitled to and ask as many questions as you possibly can. 25 years in the forces is hard by any means but coming out will seem hard, do your research on what you want to do and don't let people worry you into thinking there is no jobs out there. Employers love ex service personnel because they know how regimented they are and well disciplined.

    If you need any more information then get in touch

    Thanks,
    Tom
     
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  11. davidM1996

    davidM1996 Type 1 · Member

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    Hi im in the army and have also been diagnosed with T1 only last month, it would be good to hear what they have said to you and what information you have been given
     
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