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Diagnosed today type 1, scared and could use some advice.

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Cd-astro, Jul 31, 2019.

  1. Colin Crowhurst

    Colin Crowhurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    find the book "Carbs & Cals" or download the app easiest way to actually work out what you are eating. I am sure you'll be very surprised ; use this website to research LCHF diet and take what you want from that. Its sort of up to you how far you go BUT it will definitely get you moving forward , but remember little steps.

    Do you have any dietary choices/ needs already ? Vegetarion, Vegan for example?
     
  2. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I expect you’ll be kept on the same dose of insulin and 50g carbs per meal for a while so that the medical team can see how you respond once your body’s adjusted to using insulin. As others have said, something like Carbs and Cals, which you can get as an app, will help you to keep to 50g per meal. You’ll also need scales that weigh in grams and have a function that allows you to revert to zero so you can weigh each kind of carb you put on your plate. There may be shops that sell them where you live? 50g is generous, which is good as you may get hungry now that there’s a chance your body can use more of the carbs you eat.
    It’s also a good idea to keep a record of what your blood sugars are before you eat and about three to four hours afterwards. Note the times on the record. When the DSN sees you again they’ll be able to use your records to work out what doses of insulin you’ll probably need to get your blood sugars at a reasonable level.
    It can feel rough to begin with. Commiserations. At least now you’ve got started on insulin you should begin to feel better and I hope that before too long you’ll be in your stride with the T1 stuff.
    What are you studying? There are a few of us who were diagnosed when we were students.
     
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  3. Cd-astro

    Cd-astro · Member

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    I'm in a weird situation where the doctor that prescribed the insulin is not my usual as I am in a completely different area of the country. Hoping for an emergency appointment with my gp on monday. Hence why I haven't had any carb counting sessions. Really this was all a quick fix over the weekend once I'm back in liverpool.

    I'm doing an astrophysics phd so it will be interesting to see how things turn out since I have to travel a lot and also do observing at high altitude.
     
  4. Cd-astro

    Cd-astro · Member

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    Yeah my temporary nurse recommended that to me. I don't have any other dietry requirments which makes things slightly less complicated for me.
     
  5. Colin Crowhurst

    Colin Crowhurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My local book shop had it on the shelf (Watersons) so I picked it up on the day of release from Hospital. Didn't have to wait for delivery! for Breakfast I recommend Eggs & Bacon, definitely the way to start the day in a good mood!
     
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  6. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The calculating should be a doddle for you then, once you begin, and the analysis of your reactions should be too. If you’re travelling (Hawaii, Oz?) then taking spares of everything with you, and keeping everything T1 close, never in the hold, is essential. There are a few devices that will keep insulin cool in hot weather and possibly maintain a more even temperature at altitude. I use Frio. It’s also a good idea to check the temperatures at which blood sugar monitors are happiest, I’ve been known to tuck one under my clothes to keep it warm.
    Another thing that can happen is that insulin needs will slightly alter as you change climates but you should be ok when you’ve become happy adjusting your doses.
    @helensaramay travels a lot for work and I’m tagging her as her advice will probably be good even though she’s on a pump, not manual injections.
     
  7. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Expert

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    @Fairygodmother thanks for the tag.
    As you say, I travel a fair amount and that is not impacted by diabetes.
    The key things for me when travelling are
    - take at least twice as much of everything than you think you may need. This is in case it gets damaged, lost or your return home is delayed. If your meter runs on batteries, don't forget spares.
    - keep all you diabetes stuff in your hand luggage. Insulin may not survive the hold or your luggage may go awry. If you need an extra bag, most airlines allow this, apparently, if you ask beforehand. I just keep to the single bag and never have a problem.
    - make sure your travel insurance covers diabetes. As it is a known condition, it is more likely to be the thing that goes wrong. However, after hundreds of work and leisure trips, I have not had a diabetes problem.
    - get a reusable letter from your diabetes team. GPs usually charge for these but hospital based diabetes teams do not. I carry mine with my passport at all times to explain why I need alll my diabetes stuff. I have only needed it once in 15 years but, like insurance, I would rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.
    - don't make a fuss about diabetes. You do not have to tell the airline or security unless they ask you.
    - if you are travelling somewhere hot, Frio wallets are fantastic for keeping insulin cool.
    - if you are travelling somewhere cold, keep your insulin insulated and warm. I find the inside pocket of my down jacket perfect due to insulation and body warmth. I keep my meter there too after it errored when it was too cold.

    @Cd-astro you also mentioned altitude. I have less experience of high altitude : only a short trip up an Ecuadorian volcano and a Himalayan trek some years ago. The biggest problem (assuming you do not get altitude sickness) is that bg meters do not work at high altitude.
    Therefore I recommend discussing this with your diabetes team, reviewing your meter specs and maybe call the meter manufacturer. However, when I called I was told "meters work fine in a commercial airline"!

    The most important thing I was told when first diagnosed was "diabetes should not stop you doing what you want."
    I have tested this a lot and not failed to do what I want although I may need a little extra preparation.
     
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