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Differences

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Pastell, Dec 3, 2012.

  1. Pastell

    Pastell · Member

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    I have a question, What is the difference between a T1 diabetic using insulin and a T2 using insulin? In fact as I'm typing this, I begin to realize it cannot be a new question. Maybe I just want other peoples input.
     
  2. nataliegage

    nataliegage · Active Member

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    Differences are Type 1 diabetes isusually diagnosed in childhood and it is necessary for them to be treated with insulin whereas Type 2 usually starts at a more mature age. If a patient cannot be controlled on diet, they then go onto tablets and if that doesn't work they will be treated with insulin. On insulin they will obviously have the same problems (hypo's) that any insulin dependent diabetic can suffer. But they will have a more adaptable treatment as insulin can be raised by units, whereas tablets are not that easy to just increase by a small margin. I've been on insulin for 60 years and TG I am still here. Good luck with whatever treatment suits you.

    Natalie
    T1 60 years :thumbup:
     
  3. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Hi type 1 is where the pancreas stops working completely as the body attacks the pancreas and destroys it, so we have to inject insulin to survive. A type 2 still has a functioning pancreas and if diet or diet and tablets do not work properly to control the BS, then the GP or DSN may recommend small amounts of insulin, but still type 2. I hope this little bit of info was helpful. Best wishes RRB
     
  4. Garthion

    Garthion · Member

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    As has been said, Type 1 diabetics have a non-functioning pancreas which doesn't produce any insulin, thus they require injections of insulin to survive. Type 2 Diabetics have a fully functional pancreas that produces a normal amount of insulin but their body is resistant to the effects that insulin has, sometimes it can be helped by diet alone but some people require medication for their bodies to become less resistant to the insulin. There is also people who produce less insulin to which they are resistant so require both the tablets to reduce this resistance and extra insulin to prevent the high glucose associated with lower quantities of insulin.

    There are other differences, but they are more complex. Also please note, Type 1 Diabetes is not just diagnosed in Childhood or as a Young Adult, you can develop it at any time in your life, and Type 2 is not just for older people, there are now significant numbers of much younger people who are developing T2. The old ideas to do with age being related to what type of Diabetes you get have been out dated by these facts.
     
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