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DISABLED STUDENTS ALLOWANCE

Discussion in 'Benefits' started by stoney, Feb 22, 2016.

  1. stoney

    stoney Parent · Well-Known Member

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    Hi my Son will be going off to Uni this September and wondered if being diabetic and a coeliac he would be entitled to disabled students allowance. Has anyone on here ever been granted this? Thanks
     
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  2. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have no idea but then logic tells me that diabetes and coeliac is not a disability.
     
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  3. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Hi, I googled and found this, which looks like a good example of what might be available.

    1. You have a needs assessment and, during this needs assessment, your academic needs are highlighted. You are able to discuss problems you think you'll have with an advisor and they'll produce a report recommending support (things you can claim through DSA). The money from the DSA itself is usually paid directly to the university, supplier or organisation involved in providing the support although there are exceptions.

      There are three components of DSA

      Specialist equipment (up to 5k for the duration of the course)
      Non-medical helper allowance (up to 20.5k a year)
      General allowance (£1,724 a year)

      The specialist equipment can include things like a computer and apporpriate software, a voice recorder (to record lectures), a PDA or anything else that might be relevant and essential to your study.

      Non-medical helper (things like someone to carry equipment or books, an assistant to help with labwork or in the library, study skills sessions and a mentor)

      General allowance (non-essential books, photocopying, Internet costs or, if you face additional costs as a result of your disability, travel costs).

      How much you get really depends on the extent to which your study is affected by your condition. The amounts stated above are maximum amounts, and it's rare for any student to even get close to those amounts (those who do will have complex needs and/or mulitple disabilities).
     
  4. stoney

    stoney Parent · Well-Known Member

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    So it does not look promising. The thing is, if we don't try and find out later that we may have been able to, we would kick ourselves. Both his Dad and I are retired now so its worth a try at least but won't hold out too much hope.. Thanks
     
  5. zed

    zed · Active Member

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    I used to get DSA but it was mainly for my dyslexia however they did ask if I wanted further support with being type 1. I did not take this but it incorporated things like a place to go lie down if I'm feeling tired etc. best thing to do would be to contact the student disability services at the university they can provide further advice.
     
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  6. stoney

    stoney Parent · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks will do some research
     
  7. rachelj80

    rachelj80 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi, I went to University approx. 10 years ago now but I did get disability allowance. I don't know if things are still the same but when I ticked yes to a disability ( I only have type 1 diabetes) I then had to meet someone who assessed what I needed. This being a mini fridge to store insulin as I was in halls with a shared kitchen. I also received a computer and printer as the man argued I could loose my space on a library one to take breaks for food.

    I also did my exams in a separate place as then the time could be stopped if I had low blood sugar levels but this may have been arranged through the Uni.

    I'm glad that I ticked yes but it did involve an afternoon going to visit the assessor and the closest place was London so I had to pay for the transport there. Hope this helps.
     
  8. BlaiseS

    BlaiseS Type 1 · Member

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    I'm currently at university and have been recieving DSA for the last 3 years due to an anxiety disorder, but next year I'll have to add on that I have diabetes.
    When you have the needs assessment, you can get some great stuff that might help out! One of the best things I got was a voice recorder to use in my lectures, this could benefit your son as if he goes high or a little low in class his concentration may be disrupted.
    It's also possible to get laptop warantee's and other equiptment such as printers... but these you have to buy yourself and then claim back through DSA. I don't see why these would be necessary with diabetes though.
    I also had the option of recieving money back on taxi fares, if I were feeling anxious one day I could get a taxi and the money would be refunded - as long as I got a receipt from the driver. This could be good for your son also, the low days we definitely don't want to walk to class and the high days we're too tired to!
    He may also be able to recieve counselling, which I personally would take and see how it goes... being at university may be stressful and it would be good to have some support for him in place, just incase. He can always opt out at a later date, but once he's refused it's very difficult to get the support.

    I know it's late now, but you should still be able to apply, just phone up student finance and ask. Also, if you've applied and had the assessment already, there's always next year to apply and get further assistance if he'd like anything I've suggested.

    I'd say go for it, because it is listed as a disability on the student finance website and there's some great things that he can rely on even if he doesn't use them, it's great to have something to fall back on. Where is he going to university? If it's anywhere near mine, I'll keep an eye out!
     
  9. Llinz04

    Llinz04 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    I'm diabetic type 1 and i'm a student on my second year now. I didn't get DSA but I got a lot of help from the disability service. They made sure that I got to do my exams in a separate room to everyone else (if you wanted to) and they allowed extra time (if you wanted to check levels or get some food). They also supplied me with a mini fridge for my room.

    Hope this helps :)
     
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