1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Does T1D have a brain?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Steve14, Feb 2, 2017.

  1. Steve14

    Steve14 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Because it sure feels like it! I keep a strict diet, but once every month or every two months, I order myself a pizza. The past two times (prior to this one) I had X levels, and gave X units of insulin. Not 2 hours passed by, and I was under 5. Weird. The very same thing happened in December. But today was different. Try to imagine this: I left 2 slices because I was full, then nearly two hours afterwards I was preparing for a hypo, and even checked: I was at 6. So I thought I'll be smart this time and eat the remainder two to avoid an incoming hypo, but now I ended up with 11.6!!!!!!!! ***? I haven't been over 10 in a month. You try to outsmart it, and then it laughs you in the face. I don't get it. Take this as a sort of venting or cry for help or as you please. It truly ruined my day. :arghh:
     
  2. Steve14

    Steve14 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    It's like a **** if you do, and **** if you don't situation. I'm scared to go off my strict diet now because I work a job that compares to building a house of cards, and if I go high, then I become clumsy and may have to start everything all over, even if I'm almost done with my shift.
     
  3. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    20,856
    Likes Received:
    34,483
    Trophy Points:
    298
    • Like Like x 1
  4. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    23,618
    Likes Received:
    19,616
    Trophy Points:
    278
    What is done is done @Steve14 , finish your shift and move on :)
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  5. Steve14

    Steve14 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    "If you are taking insulin, the pizza effect is an even bigger deal. You might inject insulin to cover the first 1–2 hours after your meal, but the carbohydrate in the meal will not be in your blood yet. So you might go low. Then a couple of hours later when the glucose kicks in, the insulin will have worn off, and you’ll be way too high."

    Oh God... well, no more "pizza effect" for me then. :( TY for the article!
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  6. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,913
    Likes Received:
    4,888
    Trophy Points:
    198
    @Steve14 .
    Extra pizza.
    11.6.
    First time over 10 in a month.
    Those 3 quotes together would be utopia for most T1's I know.
    As @noblehead has said move on and don't waste time even trying to figure out the reason why.
    Sounds to me you're doing just fine.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Steve14

    Steve14 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    How silly that I thought that all the protein in cheese and ham counteracts the carbs in the dough.... little did I know it is the "pizza effect". Since then I had my evening snack and gave higher units than usual, but now I'm a solid 12 and starting to have that weird taste in my mouth. On the other hand I'm not thinking about food every 2 hours - that's the only positive side effect. It feels good to be "normal" every once in a while, but I won't risk it again. Good night!
     
  8. jessirene

    jessirene Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    43
    My doctor has always told me that if I eat pizza, either take my insulin half way through the meal or immediately after.
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
  9. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    23,618
    Likes Received:
    19,616
    Trophy Points:
    278
    Don't be so hard on yourself as living with diabetes is one big learning curve, in this Mendosa article Gary Scheiner (Think like a Pancreas) explains the process how fat effects bg levels long after the carbs have digested:

    So what about after the carbohydrates are finished doing their thing? That’s when the fat itself begins to exert its effects. The process goes something like this:

    1. You eat a high-fat meal or snack (this is the fun part).
    2. In a few hours, the fat begins to digest; this continues for several hours.
    3. The level of fat in the bloodstream (triglycerides) rises.
    4. High triglycerides in the bloodstream cause the liver to become resistant to insulin.
    5. When the liver is insulin resistant, it produces and secretes more glucose than usual.
    6. The blood glucose rises steadily as the liver’s glucose output goes up.
    This is what causes the gradual, delayed blood glucose rise after consumption of large amounts of fat. The response seems to be “dose-dependent” – the more fat you consume, the more insulin resistant the liver becomes, and the more glucose it produces. The type of fat also appears to play a role. Saturated fats (the type found in dairy and animal products) seem to cause more insulin resistance than monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (the type found in vegetable products).

    http://www.mendosa.com/The-Fat-of-the-Matter-How-Dietary-Fat-Effects-Blood-Glucose.htm
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  10. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    8,907
    Likes Received:
    11,769
    Trophy Points:
    198
    The main reason that this is a much bigger problem for T1s is that only a small proportion of Exogenous insulin makes it to the liver, while in a normally functioning human, the majority of insulin hits the liver first. As a result, the liver insulin resistance that takes place has little insulin to interact with in the first place, and the production of glucagon by the liver is much harder to restrain.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. rockape37

    rockape37 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    197
    Trophy Points:
    83
    The thing is you can do everything correctly and still get a wayward high or low.

    Our bodies are far more complex than the insulins and insulin delivery systems.

    Regards

    Martin
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook