1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2018 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Arrived here after watching The Truth About Carbs? Join the Low Carb Program for meal plans & 10 weeks of simple steps into your new lifestyle.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Driving after laser

Discussion in 'Driving and DVLA' started by RobAO, Feb 16, 2018.

Tags:
  1. RobAO

    RobAO Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Hello Everyone,
    I have been T2 for 20 years, 50 years old. About 7 years ago i had hemorrhage in my right eye requiring vitrectomy and laser, leaving very impaired vision on that eye. All was well, with regular checkups to the left eye until a few days ago when i was advised that new vessels were developing. My consultant has recommended laser but was very vague on the driving implications other than I need to advise the DVLA about the treatment, he wouldnt offer an opinion on DVLA reaction and continued driving in the short term or longer term. Driving is essential to my job and in very frightened about the future. Can anybody tell me what is likely to happen:

    When do i tell DVLA, is it after first session of do i wait till the course is complete
    What will happen when i tell the DVLA, will my licence be revoked immediately or do they wait to see the extent of the treatment needed
    Will i nee to have a filed test between each session
    How long will it all take to get a licence back if it is revoked (assuming i pass the field test) etc

    No scare stories please im very frightened and depressed and need more information

    Thanks
    Rob
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,706
    Likes Received:
    5,288
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi you have to inform them but leave it for a few months so things settle down a bit as you will be required to do a field vision test. Obviously the results will determine as to whether you keep your licence or not.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. RobAO

    RobAO Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Thanks Carbs :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. sally and james

    sally and james Family member · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    968
    Likes Received:
    1,707
    Trophy Points:
    158
    You should check the DVLA web site, but according to my recollection, you should inform DVLA as soon as you have treatment to a second eye. Your licence will not be immediately revoked. You will be sent to have the appropriate tests at a local, approved optician, then you will have to wait for a letter to arrive. Our experience was that James got given a three year licence. After three years (with no more laser) he had to have a further test at the opticians, following which his licence was renewed for a further three years. Many people who have had laser in both eyes continue to drive.
    Sally
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. petdell

    petdell Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    105
    Trophy Points:
    93
    As well as doing a driving field vision test, this is using both eyes, not singularly,as in a normal field test. This generally makes it easier. The main criteria is reading a number plate at 20 metres. This equates to the 3rd line from the bottom, on a normal letter board, at an opticians
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. RobAO

    RobAO Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Thanks Sally and Peter, my vision is fine last test was 6/7.5 which im told is pretty good
     
  7. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    Likes Received:
    631
    Trophy Points:
    133
    This site gives some useful info about diabetic retinopathy and the DVLA:- https://www.eyesite.co.uk/news/driving-with-diabetic-retinopathy

    Modern multi-spot lasers are less likely than old-style single-spot lasers to cause large scars that impact on peripheral vision for driving so it's worth checking whether this is the type you will be having. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27077924

    Only a minority of people treated lose their licence. When you go for laser, it's worth mentioning that this your 'good eye' and that you drive for a living. Hopefully, you will one of the majority who can continue to drive but, at the end of the day, this treatment is needed to save your sight.
     
  8. RobAO

    RobAO Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Thanks for the advise Dark horse, its very much appreciated.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Soapybubs87

    Soapybubs87 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Hi im a t1 and had loads of lazer to both eyes and injections..i wasnt every good for a long time and sorted my life out to fast getting a hba1c of 123 to 63 in the space of a few months and my eyes didnt takr kindly to it however i was at spec savers and decided before id apply for my provisional id just do a visual fields test and see what my vision was like as the lazer destroys the periphal to save tge central and i got 118 out of 120 so applied for my provisional and got it, so dont be put off like i said ive had about in total 13 or more sessions over 2 years thankfully all is stable now my eyes arent perfect but i can see thats the main thing
     
  10. Celsus

    Celsus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    490
    Likes Received:
    397
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Can add to the good feedback from Soapybubs above:
    Approx. 30 years ago I suddenly had bleedings appearing on my right retina and my world came tumbling down fast. Actually within hours literally. At that time laser was not really possible, as the eye was full of the blood that had leaked out. And I was more or less 100% blind on that eye for the next 3-4 months until suddenly it cleared up by itself. And then I got the first laser treatments on that eye, with some 3 weeks between each session. When examined at the hospital, they also observed that the other eyed need the same to avoid bleedings commencing there. So both eyes got treated over the next two years, with longer periods of 2-4 months where each of them were close to 'blind' in the effect I could see anything with them, or in the clearing up periods I could really see much or read or anything. I got in total between 12-14,000 shots on each eye. But slowly but surely they cleared up. 10 months after the last treatment I was back to normal 20/20 vision on both eyes! But as noted by other posters above, the laser shots did of course burn away some of your optical cells on your retina, mainly around and outside the macula, as the eye doctors will avoid as much as possible to hit that area, as that provides for your central vision/focus area. So when observing carefully, you may notice after your laser procedures that you now have some 'black spots' in your peripheral vision. E.g. a small spot where you potentially will not notice a small object (e.g. a ping pong ball at 3meter distance) placed outside your central vision area. However, if it moves just slightly, you will still be able to observe that movement. And as other posters also wrote above, when using both eyes, the reduced peripheral vision is hardly noticeable, as the two eyes covers well for each other. At that time home glucose monitoring had just become possible, so I switched to that as well as to the intensive insulin therapy with multiple daily injections. My bg levels have been down to 'normal' ever since then and I have had no further problems with my eyes since then. But it was surely a tough period in my life to go through, as all my studies and life in general came to a full stop for like 12-18 months back then. It certainly made me think very differently about life and what miracle it truly is to see and huge respect for the many individuals that are less fortunate in this world.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook