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Employment ... (or not)!

Discussion in 'Jobs and Employment' started by PeterJH, Jun 9, 2016.

  1. PeterJH

    PeterJH Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hello everyone. I'm sixty years old, have been type 1 for 43 years and am rather new to all this so any help would be appreciated.
    Current employer is wanting me to see occupational health due to several hypos, which I am presuming will lead to the termination of my employment due to the safety nature of my job.
    My question is can I get any financial help for not being able to continue in my current line of employment?
    I have not registered myself as disabled although I also have asthma, depression and other health issues.
    Thanks for reading and thanks in advance.
    PeterJH
     
  2. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

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    Hi and welcome !!

    it would be a shame if that were the cause of the loss of your job-- i don't know much at all on employment law
    but am bumping in the hope you will get a response !!
    could they possibly move you to a different dept ?
    at 60 you are closer to retirement than starting a career
    is there a possibility to retire ??
     
  3. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    Hello Peter, and welcome.

    I'm not an HR person, but I have managed a large number of people over the years, some of whom had health issues from time to time.

    Firstly I would say a couple of things in general. Please don't allow your age to cloud the issue here. Your employer cannot take your age into account in making any decisions about you, unless you were in a profession which does not allow professional registration over a certain age. These are very few and far between, and from the little I know if those, the ages they are talking about are significantly more mature than 60.

    Secondly, your employer has a responsibility to look after you, as well as their business, their customers and your colleagues. That looking after is different for each of those categories, but that brings me onto your proposed meeting with Occ Health.

    If you are suffering "several hypos", I imagine this may be affecting you and maybe impacting on your work. Your employer is likely to want to understand what is going on, but, understandably, your line manager is unlikely to be equipped with with any medical knowledge, never mind experience of T1. Occ Health may not have huge experience of diabetes, but they will have access to it, for sure.

    As a T1 diabetic, your employer is obliged to make "reasonable adjustments" in order to protect your (and their business) wellbeing. That could be an additional 10 minute break to snaffle a quick snack, or allow you to pause periodically to test and assess, or whatever. There may be other things in play that could be tweaked a bit.

    would suggest you go to your Occ Health meeting with an open mind. If you know what is causing your hypos, then tell them, as that may inform them well enough to take steps to decrease the chances of them happening so frequently.

    If you are a decent worker and have a good reputation with them, they will not want to lose you. Having someone you know and can trust to do their job well is very valuable to a business. It costs a lot of money to "manage someone out of a business", and it then costs a lot of money to recruit someone new, who might turn out to be unsuitable, longer term.

    If you are feeling very unsettled with all of this, if you are a union member, then contact them and tell them what's going on, so that if required, they can step in and support you at a future point.

    When you go to your meeting, take notes. It's usual (in my experience) that whomever has asked for you to be seen by Occ Health (HR or your Line Manager I'm guessing) will receive a report of your meeting, with findings (no medical details are usually included in this, except at the highest level; say confirming why you are there and the condition you are dealing with), and any proposals for moving forward, such as additional breaks/pauses or whatever.

    Even if that meeting doesn't go exactly as you would like, you would always have the right of appeal and so on.

    Please don't fast forward to being out of work. Hopefully that's a long way off and at a date of your choosing.

    Let us know how you get on.
     
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  4. KevinPotts

    KevinPotts Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    How long have you worked for your employer?

    Do you have a written contract/service agreement? If so it will have reasons for termination, health etc

    As @AndBreathe has so clearly stated your employer has a duty of care and having an OT suggests your employer is large and thus they are unlikely to jump to inappropriate conclusions. They may infact be supportive:)


    Diagnosed 13/4/16: T2, no meds, HbA1c 53, FBG 12.6, Trigs 3.6, HDL .75, LDL 4.0, BP 169/95, 13st 8lbs, waist 34" (2012 - 17st 7lbs, w 42").

    6/6/16: FBG AV 4.6, Trigs 1.5, HDL 2.0, LDL 3.0, BP 112/68, BPM 66, 11st 11lbs, waist 30".

    Regime: 20g LCHF, run 1 mile daily, weekly fasting.
     
  5. PeterJH

    PeterJH Type 1 · Newbie

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  6. PeterJH

    PeterJH Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hello "AndBreathe", Thank you for your detailed reply. Gives me something to focus on and stop me feeling so depressed about "my / our condition"!! I'll let you know the results of the HR meet.
    Regards, Peter
     
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  7. PeterJH

    PeterJH Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hello Kevin, thank you for your reply. I've reviewed my contract and although I work for a small station within a large company they are quite a supportive outfit. Your details indicate you have quite a handle on things, well done. I'll be keeping you informed.
    Regards, Peter
     
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  8. Mep

    Mep Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    welcome @PeterJH - I hope you don't lose your job. I'm not in UK, but I have been through a lengthy process myself through my employer which involved about 18 months of a rehab provider working with me and attending consults with my doctor. At the end of all that I was told I wasn't fit to work full time anymore and could only work part time hours. My employer put an application in to my retirement fund to see if they would approve a partial invalidity pension. They did that. I'm now subject to medical reviews every 1-2 years. I'm not sure if you have any similar process there? I wish you the best though as i know how daunting it is being put under the microscope about your health and your ability to work. Even though I'm part time my duties have also been modified because I can't physically do my full job (have voice disorders so can't talk much). So I do a lot of back office work.
     
  9. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    I suspect that the safety aspect of your job may be a key factor.

    Please don't draw any direct comparisons - I know nothing about your job, your role, or your situation - but my husband has 'a safety critical role' and the actions of HR are completely governed by this, and by agreements which are established with the union.

    As a result of this, a recent employee whose health deteriorated to the point they could no longer do the 'safety critical' aspect of the role was offered a choice - stay on in another role with a permanent contract (non-safety critical) or take early retirement with a financial deal (about which I know nothing).

    I mention this to explain that the 'safety' aspect had a major impact in the situation, and dictated/restricted the options that HR could offer.

    Hope that helps.
     
  10. KevinPotts

    KevinPotts Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    How's it going Peter?


    Sent from my iPad using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
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