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Type 1 Eye surgery

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Jackie100, Dec 9, 2018.

  1. Jackie100

    Jackie100 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If you have to have VITRECTOMY
    Endolaser eye surgery is there a chance you will lose your driving license?
     
  2. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Hi Jackie - I don't know the answer to your question, but I'm bumping it up into a more visible spce for you. I hope someone will be around with some helpful information soon. :)
     
  3. Lazybones

    Lazybones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Dear Jackie100,
    I'm not sure what you know about a Vitrectomy or what you've been told what it is but this might help

    What Is a Vitrectomy?

    It's a type of eye operation. A doctor removes the vitreous, a jelly-like fluid inside your eye, and replaces it with a saline solution.

    Why Do You Get It?
    For you to see, light has to pass through your eye and reach your retina, the bundle of tissue at the back of your eye that senses light. It sends the information to your brain.

    Various diseases can cause fluid in the vitreous to cloud, fill with blood or debris, harden, or scar. This can keep light from reaching your retina properly and cause vision trouble. Removing and replacing the fluid may solve or improve the problem.

    Sometimes the retina pulls away from the tissue around it. Your doctor could do a vitrectomy to make it easier to get to your retina and repair it.

    It can also give your doctor access to your macula, which lies at the center of your retina and provides sharp central vision. A hole in it can result in blurry vision. With the vitreous fluid gone, it’s easier to fix

    As for your question as to whether you would loose your driving licence, i and no-body else can say, but it's very unlikely that this will happen from the statistics that I've found. This is a relaively straight forward procedure and you should come through it with improved vision according to everything that I've unearthed on this.

    do't worry unduly, this procedure is common these days. Please let us know how you get on.

    Best wishes - Lazybones
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Jackie100

    Jackie100 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks lazybones
    I did know quite a bit about the operation I was just a bit worried as to if it would look bad on the forms you have to fill out every three years for you driving licence thanks again though
     
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