1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2022 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Finding out people you know are also T2 & how they treat it

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Ronancastled, Nov 11, 2021.

  1. Ronancastled

    Ronancastled Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,001
    Likes Received:
    629
    Trophy Points:
    173
    Well it's that time of life, you're nearing 50, if one in ten have there's bound to be someone in your social circle who has it.
    I've only found out in the past few months that 2 of the gang have also been diagnosed.

    One chap, let call him Philip, cause that's his name & none of you know him, got diagnosed about 3 years ago.
    Both his parents are T2s & he once tipped the scales at 30st so he was lock on, did well to avoid it until his mid 40s.
    He's lost about 6st & only takes Met, once he's in single figures he & his doctor are happy, last A1c was mid 60s which he reckons is OK.
    Both his parents are riddled with complications but he reckons the medications have moved on since their day so he'll be alright.
    Low carb to him is smaller portions but as we're talking about a guy who would start the day with 10 deli sausage rolls he's probably down to 5.

    Other chap is very well educated & up on the recent studies.
    He topped the scales at 21st at diagnosis but took it seriously & was back down to 14st 3 years ago.
    He was so motivated that he actually was in charge of our C25k program & was able to run sub 30min 5ks at one point.
    Then he pushed it attempting 10ks & adventure/quest running.
    During this period he was completely in remission, once posting a <30 A1c which was amazing.
    Unfortunately he injured his calf & became sofa bound for 6 months where he piled the weight back on.
    Despite eating low carb he was devouring massive portions & the occasional treat turned into the norm.
    He admits he was self destructing & saw it in his meter, he kept this secret from his wife who eventually found out & marched him to a Private Endo.
    Now he's become a huge advocate for Ozempic as it's been his magic bullet.
    I toyed with the idea about bringing up secondary drug failure with him but elected not to.

    I was on a stag recently with both these guys where they were devouring the pub sandwiches & baskets of chips.
    They are grow adults so I don't see it as my job to attempt an intervention.

    How are your friends with T2 faring or do you compare notes ?
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Hug Hug x 1
  2. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,034
    Likes Received:
    4,089
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I find female friends don't admit to having been diagnosed t2.
    I think that's either because they feel ashamed its something they've done to themselves (by over eating) or because they don't think they can go low carb and stick to it. One or 2 mention it to me "privately or in confidence" but won't talk about it openly.

    The men are immediately put on diets by their wives, and its the wives who then take over and take charge. The men are happy to take medication, believing it can resolve. They 'cheat' more often too.

    I know these are sweeping generalisations, but its what is happening currently in my circle
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Riva_Roxaban

    Riva_Roxaban Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,248
    Likes Received:
    3,759
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I know several people that are T2, they do not seem to worry about eating junk food. I told them I was following the LCHF way and had my readings manageable.

    They basically said "Yeah right, good one." and continued to shovel hot chips in their mouths.

    Good luck to them, they're not my problem, you can lead a camel to water but you cannot force him / her to drink it. :meh:
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Winner Winner x 1
  4. Jo_the_boat

    Jo_the_boat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    686
    Likes Received:
    518
    Trophy Points:
    153
    Unless they're looking after themselves 'behind closed doors' my friends don't seem to take it as seriously as me.
    I know one or two real porkers who will probably only do something about it when something goes wrong.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. zand

    zand Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    10,481
    Likes Received:
    16,358
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Just want to say that I am still 'a real porker' 10 years on from diagnosis. I have low carbed for most of that time and the only Hba1c I have had in the diabetic range was the February 2021 one, post covid. Long covid made my BGs much harder to control.
     
    • Hug Hug x 4
    • Like Like x 3
  6. Widgets

    Widgets Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    333
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I have several friends who are T2, the ones that I know anything about are all on Metformin. Especially in the last couple of years I've not seen any of them often enough to know much at all about their diet.

    One person who is more of a friend of a friend is currently in hospital having had most of their toes removed - and is still getting McDonalds sent in to them, as well as cakes, sweets and chocolates.

    Another friend recently went onto a new medication but is now talking about having changed their diet and lost some weight, so for them and their spouse I have high hopes that they will manage to improve matters.

    I sit VERY firmly on my hands when I see mention of T2 on social media and do NOT post links to here. Although I'm pretty sure it would help some (most?) people it would probably alienate and harm others. It's a balancing act.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,890
    Likes Received:
    2,895
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I can understand why some would choose not to get drawn into discussion about diabetes with their social circle (including social media) but I fail to understand how you see it would harm people if you were to post links to here.

    Ultimately people make their own choices but as this and many other sites prove so many don’t get much choice about what they do as they are simply never told about the full range of options. Of course they could do the self research that many of us did to get here and to other sources of information but not everyone is like that and many do need a bit of a head start where to look.

    Personally I see it as paying forward the support I’ve had from this and similar sources and giving people the tools to make informed choices.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,890
    Likes Received:
    2,895
    Trophy Points:
    198
    To answer the original question almost all of those I do know either do nothing whatsoever with a fatalistic attitude, rely on medication alone and of those I conversed with pretty much all claim they can’t give up x y or z and by implication prefer to take their chances.

    I’ve probably been aware of more other type 2 than some people have as I’m pretty open about it (you can hardly miss my “odd” eating habits) and willing to state I control it by diet and am happy to discuss it with those that are interested. A handful are curious about the basics.

    A couple, having tried the usual low calorie diets, were amazed at the benefits of low carb instead once they wrapped their head round it. Until the medical profession promotes it more directly and widely then most people will see it as a fad/gimmick and be scared of the fat/cholesterol though. Their nurse/doctor is typically their only trusted source of information.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. Widgets

    Widgets Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    333
    Trophy Points:
    103
    My impression is that all of the people I'm thinking of do know the stuff that's talked about here, but they are choosing not to act on it. They are all intelligent, educated, people who are likely to do research and are unlikely to take what they're told as gospel - even if it's delivered by a (metaphorical) white coat.

    Given that, as soon as I was told 'prediabetes' I started looking and found this place straight away I don't think me posting about it would help.

    I've not mentioned that I've been dealing with blood sugar issues on any social media, I don't want to be getting 'helpful advice' from the peanut gallery. If I were seeing people in RealSpace then yes, I'd talk about it (and it would be blindingly obvious that *something* has changed for me - you don't lose 30kg and not have people notice), but it's not something that flows naturally in online interactions.
     
  10. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,890
    Likes Received:
    2,895
    Trophy Points:
    198
    This goes to not wanting to personally discuss it. Entirely a personal choice. You don’t explain how you think it could “harm” to do so.
     
  11. Widgets

    Widgets Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    333
    Trophy Points:
    103
    As, I suspect, the people I'm thinking of all already know about low carb/diet control/exercise etc but have, for various reasons, not taken that route, posting links to here and mentioning this forum may well entrench the 'don't wannas' in people's brains.

    I don't want to be the peanut gallery, even if I'm not explicitly directing it at anyone but just talking about my own experience, putting people on any kind of defensive is rarely helpful, often positively harmful. If the subject came up organically then yes, I would offer a link, but I am unwilling to start the conversation. After all, what do I know, I'm not really diabetic? At least one friend has said something along the lines of 'the GP said I'm prediabetic, but that's not really a thing')
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,979
    Likes Received:
    2,512
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I think unless it is a very close family member or friend who you know wants to talk about it, people should mind their own business. Is there anything worse than someone else looking at you and judging your choice whether it's a good or a bad one? I suspect most people know darn well what they need to do about it and if they choose not to or prefer to ignore it, well that's entirely up to them. Their business. As for whether a person is 'well educated' or not, as far as I am concerned that has very little to do with anything. In my area of business I come across highly educated people and those who barely went to school, none of which has much bearing on their choices pertinent to a wide range of issues, including their health.
     
    • Agree Agree x 8
    • Winner Winner x 1
  13. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,094
    Likes Received:
    2,648
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I am still a real porker (assuming you mean fat) but have successfully controlled my diabetes through low carbing for a decade. Apart from on this site, none of the type 2 diabetics I know control their carb intake and are on numerous drugs. They say well done if I share my experience but say life wouldn't be worth living without cake. They both blame their weight for having type 2 diabetes and hide their condition. The type 1 diabetic in our circle looks down on type 2 diabetics and freely expresses her blame attitude, unfortunately, so open discussion is difficult.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,575
    Likes Received:
    2,091
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I think the chance of acceptance is at least part of the reason for the official recommendations of low GI rather than low carb. Certainly my DN said the normal reaction to her suggestion of low carb was "I couldn't do that" or "Can't I just take the pills?".
     
  15. MoorT2

    MoorT2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    213
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Sorry to derail thread slightly, but as a newbie I've been reading a lot about low carb and low carb high fat diets (is the latter keto?).

    What is the definition of low carb? Is it a sliding scale based on the individual or is there an accepted definition of how many grams a day would be considered low?

    Thanks
     
  16. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,287
    Likes Received:
    1,968
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Keto is typically very low carb @ 20 g which means higher fat but in real life, higher protein too (it is hard to eat that much fat 'neat')
    Low carb has been defined at anything 120g and under.

    I think the point is to find your own 'sweet spot' - how much do you want to eat that will allow you to maintain normal blood glucose levels without medications? The underlying strategy is to reduce your body's need for insulin such that it becomes insulin sensitive again rather than insulin resistant with all the health issues that come with that.

    The implication is that you will need some blood testing strips to see how you react if you do decide to tackle diabetes in this way.

    Just chipping in here because I work with a few type 2s and my dad is one too. I am a non judgemental (just a bit jealous of those that have insulin on board naturally!) btw.
    My dad and many people I talk to, are intelligent but find it hard to decide what to do a) because food is an emotional issue for many so their food choices are not always rational b) Because the advice given on food is highly conflictual so often easier to ignore particularly when diabetes isn't immediately painful and/or a pill is offered readily by a trusted doctor.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
  17. MoorT2

    MoorT2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    213
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Thank you for the information, very informative.
    My goal is to manage my T2 without medication, I started that journey today and I want to keep my hba1c level down - if that means reducing my carb intake goal by another 30g a day I'm willing to make that adjustment.
     
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 1
  18. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,287
    Likes Received:
    1,968
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Good luck with the project. Maybe start with the carbiest meal (usually breakfast) and go from there!
     
  19. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

    Messages:
    12,004
    Likes Received:
    23,258
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Don't get me started on my friends and family who are T2 of which there are several as they drive me crazy most of them are on insulin they do not even attempt to control their intake of carbs they rarely test their bloods a couple of years ago I was in hospital having a couple of tumors removed every one on the ward was diabetic one gentlemen having maggot therapy in a last ditch attempt to save his leg. They were all scoffing down the eatwell plates of food put in front of them and injecting insulin one of the guys ended up with his right big toe amputated I feel like crying when I think of it it's so frustrating and unnecessary. :banghead::banghead:

    Oh and you can talk till you are blue in the face if they don't want to listen they won't.

    The funny thing is my friend who is T2 if you put sugar in her cup of tea you would think you were trying to poisen her by her reaction she has never taken sugar in her tea, but she will eat loads of cake and high carb foods.

    Edit to add OK rant over.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Hug Hug x 2
    #19 JohnEGreen, Nov 13, 2021 at 9:00 AM
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2021
  20. Outlier

    Outlier · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    262
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Good rant - saved me having one.

    I know a couple of type 1s and a lot of type 2s. They all take the meds and eat what they want. Their choice, but then they moan when the meds get increased or added to. What really riles me is those who try to "tempt" me to join them, with dumb phrases like "it'll be all right" or "one won't do any harm".
    Luckily for me, the more they try to make me eat carbs and sugar, the more stubborn I get.

    And thank you all again for your great advice and support.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook