1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Foot blister

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by lizziewizzie, Jul 1, 2016.

  1. lizziewizzie

    lizziewizzie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Hi all,

    I have done an insane amount of walking the last 3 days while on holiday which resulted in a blister on my foot. I thought nothing of it and have just left it. I woke up this morning like I'd been hit in the head with a light bulb!! Foot care!
    I read the following online:

    "If you do injure your foot, don't try to take care of it at home. Go to a wound-care center or your doctor, even for blisters, calluses, and scratches."

    It goes on to say they will clean it out and dress it. Well I have all that equipment at home so I've washed out the wound, applied anti septic cream and a dressing and bandaged it up and plan not to put much weight on that foot. Is that okay? Should I be worried?

    I'll keep an eye on it for signs of infection and obviously go to a doctor if that occurs.

    Thanks xxxx

    Sent from my SM-G920F using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
  2. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,603
    Likes Received:
    2,214
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Short answer, yes, you should be concerned.

    Long answer, it depends on a lot of things. If you're not very well controlled, older in age, overweight, and have a number of other health issues it can be extremely important to monitor this sort of thing. As you take away those risks, things like blisters become less of a risk.

    Either way, you should not be getting blisters no matter how far you walked. That's a strong indication that you need to consider investing in better shoes (that fit properly).


    Sent from my iPad using DCUK Forum
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. lizziewizzie

    lizziewizzie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Hey @TorqPenderloin,

    Thank you for your replacement. I was naive in thinking the trainers I was wearing were adequate. I also didn't realise how much walking we were going to do. So sadly was under prepared.
    I am 29, not overweight and have no other health issues so should be okay then. I am also well controlled I would say. I'll just keep an eye on it. Thank you so much for your quick reply xxx

    Sent from my SM-G920F using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
  4. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    23,629
    Likes Received:
    19,629
    Trophy Points:
    278
    Yes do that @lizziewizzie, but if you have any concerns then see a Dr or Podiatrist, as people with diabetes we do have to be extra careful with regards to our feet.
     
  5. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,704
    Likes Received:
    5,291
    Trophy Points:
    178
    If your blood sugars are fine and you have good circulation then with basic care you should not have a problem. If the foot s being rubbed then make sure you use a padded dressing so things don't become worse.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. RuthW

    RuthW Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,164
    Likes Received:
    1,936
    Trophy Points:
    178
    No, Torq. I've had diabetes all my life, have always worn the most carefully fitted and conservative shoes and I don't think I have ever, in fifty years, had a new pair of shoes or trainers that DIDN'T give me blisters at some point. One of the hazards of treating your feet as if they are two very special little snowflakes at the end of your legs is that they remain very soft.

    The other day my feet blistered badly while wearing a pair of flat, very soft leather shoes that I have worn without problems for two years. Why? Because it was so hot and I was sweating so much my skin became very soft.

    I don't have any problems with healing. I always strap up the most vulnerable parts of my feet whenever I buy new shoes until I am sure they have mounded to my feet adequately. But hot weather can make even old shoes chafe.


    Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,603
    Likes Received:
    2,214
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Kudos to having 50 years of experience, but there are plenty of people who have been buying improper footwear or walking with poor form all of their lives. That's not meant insultingly it's just a fact.

    When I speak of proper footwear, I mean considering length, width, pronation/supination, arch support, bodyweight, running surface, and a number of other factors. "Soft leather shoes" would probably make me blister up too but that's because I'm a wear 12.5us 4E width shoe designed to cater to my flat feet (minimal arch) and pronation when I run.

    At 210 lbs, I have zero issues running 10+ miles in 100* heat but with those conditions you also have to wear the right socks too (to account for sweat).

    In contrast, put me in the wrong shoes and I'll blister in half a mile, or if I walk/run with bad form (I have a habit of curling my toes which causes knee pain) even the right shoes could cut my runs very short.

    Bottom line: if every pair of shoes is causing blisters then it's time to address your walking/running form or something else. Blisters should not happen even if you get regular pedicures.


    Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum
     
  8. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,671
    Likes Received:
    3,670
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I understand your concern, I've had the same concern in the last week.
    It's really difficult to decide exactly what to do if you have good glucose levels and if you know there is a cause for the injury. I've just walked 150 km in 7 days with about 4.500 m of ascent and descent. I now have a partially black large toenail. I know it was bashed on some of the steeper down hills, I felt it.(and yes should have stopped to re lace boots but I didn't) If I was non diabetic then there would be no question; it's a common problem.

    So now do I follow the advice I would give to others and 'get it checked' ? That's definitely the sensible advice. However, I have to say the I haven't rushed to the doctor and am watching it carefully.
    That's because I have consistently had an HbA1c in the fives (and very low levels on this walk, albeit with at times surprisingly high ketones when I reduced my basal insulin drastically to avoid hypos). If it weren't for that then I think I should have gone to the doctor/podiatrist and had it checked.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. pinewood

    pinewood Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    760
    Likes Received:
    766
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Surely if you're tightly controlled with a near-normal HBA1C you need not treat it any differently to how anyone else (without T1D) would. That's how I look at it, anyway.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. Wurst

    Wurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,113
    Likes Received:
    1,678
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Couldn't agree with this more. My blister count must in treble figures by now thanks to my running regime and I've self treated them all. They have all healed within days which I believe is down to my tight BS control. I also had an unpleasant bike crash last year and grazed my hand pretty bad, but it too healed normally.

    BTW I discovered anti blister socks last year and now I only get blisters when running > 15 km several days in a row.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  11. RuthW

    RuthW Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,164
    Likes Received:
    1,936
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I'll rely on my endo's advice, thanks, Torq. He expressed delight at my shoes and socks last time he saw them.

    I have to say that your post in response to mine was so pompously self-righteous that it was laugh-out-loud funny.

    First of all, in what universe do you live where everyone has access to personalized gait/stride/pronation studies?

    Second, where are the actual long-term, or even short-term studies that show that given a critique of their gait, people can, in statistically significant numbers, actually achieve a beneficial change in it. Do you realize that a lot of diabetics have gait problems as a complication of their diabetes? Do you realize that home blood testing has only been around for just over twenty years, that training about self-management has been widely available for less than ten years and therefore quite a lot of T1s may find your self-righteousness as ignorant as it is offensive.

    Thirdly, what do you propose in reality? I should get my shoes hand made on an individual last? Oh, only I don't do the lottery.

    Fourth, you're a newbie. You're barely even diagnosed. You are a young, fit guy who has been doing sports all your life and presumably your feet had already toughened up before your T1 started.

    Fifth, you forgot to suggest Botox for my feet to stop them sweating, as that is what causes the problem for me, as I pointed out.

    But, you know what? A more simple, practical, useful, accessible, and safer solution for blisters, and one recommended by many sports coaches, is simple strapping with surgical tape at potential stress points prior to walking or running.

    There was research published about it in the last month or so, as I remember.

    Try to restrain yourself with the 'shoulds'. Every time I read a 'should' on this forum, it is unsupportive and bullying and untrue.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook