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Frozen shoulder

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Logie, Sep 12, 2014.

  1. Logie

    Logie Type 1 · Member

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    Hi I was diagnosed T1 (eventually after a misdiagnosis for 10 months) this time last year. Since January I've had problems with my right shoulder... After 3 visits to the doctor and a private consultation, I've been told it's diabetic frozen shoulder. As I've now no movement in the shoulder and in constant pain, the only treatment is keyhole surgery to scrape out scar tissue. Has anyone else had this? How successful was it? My reason for asking is that on-line I've found that this surgery is in advisable and that there are risks (though I was given nothing but positivity by the consultant).
     
  2. robert72

    robert72 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I had a frozen shoulder back in the 90s. I opted for some physiotherapy and it eventually got better over the course of a year. I now have about 95% range of movement with no pain. I think there are other options with steroid injections but hopefully someone else can tell you about that.

    You have my sympathies for the pain :eek:
     
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  3. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ok so a very common diabetic complication. I have had it and it is right B*****r.

    I would strongly advise against surgery unless it really really really is the last resort and you have tried everything. I had various physios and depending on their ability, they either largely sorted it out in about 6-12 weeks, or slightly helped, or did nothing at all, or forced me to headbutt them in the teeth to stop them what felt like tearing my arm off like a Sunday roast chicken wing. (A headbutt to the teeth is a friendly greeting up here on Spiker Island).

    I found an osteopath and he was completely brilliant. He completely resolved it in a couple of months, with huge gains in the first few weeks, and no drugs, no surgery, not even those stupid giant vibrating s*x toys that the physios like to use these days.

    The NHS will offer you physio of highly variable quality, usually no more than about ten goes, then advise surgery. My advice, don't do it.
     
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  4. Logie

    Logie Type 1 · Member

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    Thanks Robert72 and Spiker. After waiting 2 months to see an NHS consultant after diagnosis for frozen shoulder I paid to see the specialist at Pembury hospital. Earlier today he was thankful I'd not had steroid injections and said as there was absolutely no movement now in the shoulder joint, the only alternative was surgery - apparently the worst frozen shoulder he'd seen for sometime, Physio may have worked earlier :(
     
  5. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Oh God yes don't have steroid injections either. Again not unless utterly unavoidable.

    My osteopath has had people who could barely walk (due to frozen shoulder) come to him and he sorts them out. PM me and I will give you details, he may have a good colleague in your area.
     
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  6. MsVelvet

    MsVelvet Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Can I say that with frozen shoulder ultrasound often helps to break down the calcium build up. I would go the osteopath or chiropractic route.
     
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  7. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In my experience ultrasound is the physio's substitute for doing actual massage, which is more effective. But ymmv. It certainly can't hurt and it feels kind of nice.

    I must admit to a diminished respect for any physio who can't get in there with his or her hands and work the muscles and joints.

    Osteopaths, chiropractors, and good physios - excellent people.
     
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    #7 Spiker, Sep 12, 2014 at 12:57 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 12, 2014
  8. Logie

    Logie Type 1 · Member

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    Cheers folks.... Spiker I've replied to others posts, this is my first question posed but messaging I haven't a clue how to do! Lol. Please advise as the consensus seems give the osteopath a go... Am in Maidstone and we do have the European Training School so I might give them a call Tom
     
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  9. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My bloke is not far from there and the school is good.

    His name is Chris Tempest, Tempest Healthcare, just Google him.
     
  10. cally

    cally Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I had keyhole surgery for my frozen shoulder several years ago. I think it was called a manipulation under anaesthetic.The surgeon said that there was so much scar tissue that it would never have completely recovered without the surgery.
    I had already tried physio, chiropractic and steroid injections, none of which helped!
    After the surgery they gave me exercises to do using the stretchy bands, and I think I had about 6 weeks off work as I have a very physically demanding job.
    I now have a full range of movement in that shoulder. I also had a frozen shoulder on the other side and that took several years to recover. I still don't have a full range of movement in that side.
     
  11. Andy12345

    Andy12345 Type 2 · Expert

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    i am currently suffering from this since march:( i have my first physio appt on the 18th i was offered the injections by the doc but it is getting worse, much worse, ive given into the co dydramol and something else they gave me cant remember the name out of desperation yesterday, i was until reading through this seriously considering the injection, it stopping me sleeping the last couple of nights and generally spoiling my life now, i do a physical job but the worse thing of all is if im tugging at something and it give and i jar my arm up, yesterday i got my finger caught under something and yanked it out as a reflex and was on the floor for a couple of minutes in absolute agony, the pain was beyond belief i was close to tears, this is not ideal for double hard geeza in room full of other double hard geezas lol so i suppose ill wait for the physio and try not to top myself in the mean time, sorry this has been of no use and i hope yours gets better asap :) i empathise/sympathise/get it
     
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  12. Flowerpot

    Flowerpot Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have had frozen shoulders on both sides that have re-occurred. The first time I had Manipulation under anaesthetic (MUA) where under general anaesthetic your shoulders and pulled around into various positions to try and release some of the capsules. This worked to some extent but about 4 years later I had both shoulders completely frozen once again. I had arthroscopic capsular release on both where a camera and probe are put into the shoulder joints and the scar tissue and capsules are released and cleaned out.

    The arthroscopic release surgery worked well, it was pretty flipping painful afterwards especially having both done together but gradually I have got better movement back. I still can't raise my arms very high or reach around my back but I have a decent range of movement and my shoulders aren't as agonising as they were.

    During the first manipulation operation I had steroid injections even though I had said I didn't want them and ended up in hospital with DKA one week later so I would avoid steroids at all costs! It is such a painful condition and I wish you well with whatever course of action you take.
     
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  13. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    Mr B had v good results from an osteopath (frozen shoulder due to snookering)
     
  14. HazelD

    HazelD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I had a frozen shoulder and whether it was luck or not I was meeting with a friend who was a spiritualist...yes I know I was very skeptic but she placed her hands on my neck and shoulders for only 2 mins and believe it or not, next day I could lift my arm above my head with no problem. Not had any problem since, this was in 1992. fingers crossed!!!!
     
  15. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The pain is unbelievable. Just your own reaction to it is like getting a 240V AC shock, but the pain itself... Apparently it has been independently assessed as comparable to childbirth pain (presumably by women who have had both? dunno).Just in case anyone thinks my osteo cured me of a "mild" version.

    I have full remission of pain within weeks, and so far 95% recovery of range of movement.

    In the scheme of things I think it has more to do with the aptitude of the particular therapist, than whether they trained as chiro, osteo, physio etc.
     
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  16. rochari

    rochari Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Oh I sympathise. It was the worst pain I ever had. The thing that caused me most problems was getting caught out unexpectedly. I remember walking down the street here in no pain at all and someone asked me for directions. Without thinking I moved my arm to point back and the pain dropped me to my knees. I am sure the woman thought I'd had a heart attack! I was told at the outset that it could take up to 18 months for the symptoms to ease and they were spot on. I have some but nothing like how it was before. I still take a lot of care putting on a shirt or jacket as my memories of that still makes me shudder. I can do it now, pain is still there but nowhere near as excruciating, thank God.
     
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  17. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Someone would toss me car keys or something and reflexively I would go to grab it and it was agony. Any reflex action - grabbing for something that is falling. Excruciating.
     
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  18. rochari

    rochari Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yup, same with me Spiker. I felt physically sick with the severity of that pain yet I could sit at my desk at work and not have it all. The nasty b****r would always catch me out though....big time. I never took the painkillers offered as no matter which ones I have used over the years they caused me stomach problems but I did have 10 physio sessions at the local NHS hospital. All credit to the lass too, she was superb and those really did help as did the hints and tips she gave me.

    I began to notice a difference after about 15 months when I could, at last, sleep on my left side. That was impossible before as the pain was hellish. From then it really did begin to lessen although I still am very careful. The one thing that has puzzled me is where the heck it came from. It seemed, at least with me, to happen almost overnight and I cannot think of anything that I did that triggered it.

    Bill
     
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  19. SewK8

    SewK8 · Well-Known Member

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    Logie. How are you now? I have a frozen shoulder and see a consultant next week. My osteopath has said she can no longer help and I will need surgery. Feeling worried.
     
  20. Logie

    Logie Type 1 · Member

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    Hi SewK8,
    Although nerve wracking, considering I'd only ever had a tooth out under the old gas n air, I can thoroughly recommend surgery. Had it done on Oct. 31st and after much Physio, you must do the exercises each day, I've virtually got complete movement back in my right shoulder... Physio said I'd not get complete movement re taking my arm behind my back and she was right... I'm able to fasten my bra with ease, s'thing I wasn't able to do months previously, but do notice in the shower I've not the same range of movement (will be tricky applying sun cream in the Summer) Lol Nevertheless the post operative pain was nothing as I'd expected... To be honest it was more painful strengthening the muscles in my arm/shoulder and did pop the odd co-co dermal! However, I wouldn't think twice about having the surgery if I had frozen shoulder again, tho I'm regularly swimming and eating marmite (recommended in the U.S) to keep it at bay... Fingers crossed! Good luck, hoping your pain/discomfort is eased soon x
     
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