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Getting used to testing blood

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by eggs11, Jan 23, 2018.

  1. eggs11

    eggs11 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So I have started testing today - soon after waking 5.5 then 2 hours after breakfast 5.5 again.

    My breakfast was tsp coconut oil, scrambled eggs, 1 avocado and 5 cherry tomatoes. So thought it was a safe bet. Will be interesting to see how lunch with a bit more carbs affects things.

    I have now got my pen to work and stabbed myself pretty painlessly (sorry I'm a complete wuss about these things) - but it stung for a while afterwards - presume that's normal, or is there anything I can do to reduce that a bit? Thanks.
     
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  2. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    When you say "my pen" do you mean the pricker thing with the lancet in it?
    Sorry for being a pedant but amongst insulin takers, a pen means the thing which you use to inject insulin.

    Anyway, regarding how to get it to hurt less (it shouldn't sting for a while afterwards), there are a few techniques
    - Most prickers will have a slider or something on it to allow you to adjust the depth of the stab. Dial down the depth to as little as you need to get blood. You may be surprised how little this may be.
    - Most publicity photos of BG testing show the pricker on the fleshy part of fingers, this is the most painful area. Try stabbing to the side of this area.
    - You won't need to stab as deep if your hands are warm because this should bring your blood to the surface.
    - If all else fails, some people try numbing their fingers by plunging them in cold water. Yes, I know this is the opposite of what I just said but if you can't feel it, you can stab deeper.

    If by pen you meant insulin pen, ignore everything I just wrote and ignore my pedancy.
    Insulin pens should not sting. If they do, this may be because you have a reaction against the insulin so you should talk to your diabetes team.
     
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  3. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    The Fastclix lancet device is known as a pen. I use one.
     
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  4. eggs11

    eggs11 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, sorry I mean the pricker - I'll try adjusting the depth and although attempted the side of my finger, it probably was just on the fleshy part that I caught it. Thanks for these tips, very useful! :)
     
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  5. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    Apologies - that's just confusing for insulin users. Most have two insulin pens, a pen to document our readings and now another one to prick with.
    Perhaps we'll rename diabetes to "penabetes" :)
     
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  6. bangkokdiabetic

    bangkokdiabetic Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As far as I can see Accu-Chek do not call it a pen. Some online sellers doe call it a pen
     
  7. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    You are correct. They call it a finger pricker. However, it looks just like a pen and that is what I have always called it.
     
  8. eggs11

    eggs11 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So 2 hours after eating a couple of oatcakes with houmous, pot of plain soya yogurt (zero carbs) and 5 cherry tomatoes for lunch (total was 16 grams of carbs for the meal) the result was 6.7. Is this ok - as in if I didn't have diabetes would I expect this to be lower? Promise I won't keep asking after every meal!! - just got so many questions as I start out and get the hang of things!
     
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  9. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That's pretty good. You didn't mention if you take insulin. I'm guessing no.
     
  10. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Sounds OK to me, but remember to check before you eat and look at the rise, and if eating a low GI food like oats, especially with a lot of fat, check again after the 2 hours.
     
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  11. eggs11

    eggs11 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, yes, sorry - no meds at present.
     
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  12. eggs11

    eggs11 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks - so check again after 3 hours? Is that because sugars could still be on the way up rather than coming back down? Update - just did it 3 hours after eating - down to 5.1.

    Thanks for everyone's help - don't know where I'd be without this forum.
     
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    #12 eggs11, Jan 23, 2018 at 4:37 PM
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2018
  13. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    I would have done it earlier than 3 hours. (I always check at 2.5hours anyway) Your 5.1 is excellent. :)

    Yes, you could still be on your way up, or you may have flat lined at the 6.7, which is what can happen with slow release carbs and fats.
     
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  14. eggs11

    eggs11 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  15. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    My Multiclix and Fastclix have "Lancing Device" written on there user manuals, so that's what I call them.
     
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  16. NaijaChick

    NaijaChick Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So it seems that I am not alone with the lancets hurting hours after drawing blood. Nothing works for numbing. I’m now saving for the mygeentel and the Libra. Tried it all and the pain seems like it’s spreads over a few hours.
     
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  17. eggs11

    eggs11 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hear that, that sucks. I find it weird that it doesn't necessarily hurt right away, just afterwards - for me mainly if I aim too close to the nail - I have moved the device further round and this has helped, but for you it sounds like the mygeentel and Libra would be a good investment - they do look good.
     
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