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Glimp

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Mad76, Jul 19, 2019.

  1. Mad76

    Mad76 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,
    Having seen lots of comments on how great glimp app is I've downloaded it. Am I right to think this is what I will user to scan my libre ?? I don't need the libre app?

    Also. I am really rubbish with technology i can't even seem to understand how to scan using it ... is there a guide available anywhere ??? Or can someone please tell me simply how to scan for the first time.... i have tried to press where it says scan and nothing happens !!

    Thanks
     
  2. Muneeb

    Muneeb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You can use it instead of the libre app. But you will need the libre app or reader to initially activate the sensor. Also if your DSN needs to see the data they may want it on libreview. Once its activated you open the app and simply scan as normal. It will then show you the graph. You can visit their website for the guide, but its easier to just have a play around with it.
     
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  3. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi @Mad76 ,

    Keep the Libre app. It's needed to activate the sensor. Then continue using Glimp.

    I seem to remember some stuff posted on using Glimp. I'll have a dig about & see if I can find it.
     
  4. Muneeb

    Muneeb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  5. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Expert

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    @Mad76 - one mistake I keep making when scanning is that I accidentally turn NFC off on my phone.
    As NFC is what the phone and sensor use to talk to each other, without NFC on the phone, the sensor is having a one way conversation.
     
  6. Mad76

    Mad76 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys
    Ive found the guide
    Managed to scan myself
     
  7. Mad76

    Mad76 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My aim is to calibrate the sensor with finger pricks because my readings are alwaus out

    Can anyone tell me how to do this??
     
  8. Muneeb

    Muneeb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Open the app, hit the + button at the top right. Enter the glucose measured by the meter in the Glucose box, then hit the save icon at the top right. If done right, it will show a dot on the graph of the value you entered. If its too far out after a few entires it will automatically calibrate the readings.
     
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  9. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Expert

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    As @Muneeb said ... I think you need 3 readings when your BG is stable for Glimp to use as calibration.
    I maintain this by entering a finger prick reading first thing in the morning and last thing at night every day.
     
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  10. Mad76

    Mad76 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Great. Seems straightforward. So it automatically calibrates? All I need to do is add my glucose levels. Dont need to press anything else?
     
  11. Mad76

    Mad76 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    What do you mean by then your levels are stable?? Sideways arrow??
     
  12. Muneeb

    Muneeb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Generally don't do it after eating or after insulin s it will fluctuate. Leave it a few hours. If it changes too much anyway I think Glimp accounts for this and ignores it.
     
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  13. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Here's how I think about calibration.

    When I wake up there's a fair chance bg and ifg will be about the same and stable, because I've been resting and had no insulin or food for a while.

    If I test bg at 4.7 but libre scans at 3.6 I know that there's a fair chance the sensor is misinterpreting the ifg as 3.6 because ifg and bg are likely to be the same on waking and the bg is telling me it's 4.7, so the ifg is likely to also be 4.7 because I'm stable.

    So that's a good time to input the 4.7 into glimp to tell it, see that stuff you're getting from the sensor which says 3.6, it's not 3.6, it's actually 4.7.

    It means glimp can make a lot more sense of info it gets from the sensor in later scans.

    But doing this as calibration only works when you're stable, i.e. bg has been running relatively flattish for an hour so.

    If bg is flying up or down sharply there will be big differences just cos of biology between bg and ifg. So there's no point in calibrating when you've just dropped from 9 to 5 in the space of twenty minutes. If you typed 5 into glimp in that situation it is telling glimp ifg is 5 but it could be anything, 6, 7, 8 or whatever, but not 5, so that calibration would just make it worse.

    I made the mistake in my early days of recalibrating too often to try to chase moving bg, but that just makes it worse - be patient, defer a calibration till stable, and only calibrate once or twice a day.

    I use a different rig, libre, miaomiao and xdrip+ - get the calibration right and it can be astonishingly close, my current one is literally only about 0.2 out over the last few days.

    Good luck
     
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  14. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Expert

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    I mean I have not exercised recently so my BG is not likely to be falling or eaten recently so my BG is not likely to be rising and I have no or little bolus insulin on board which could cause my BG to fall.
    As the Libre is about 15 to 20 minutes behind finger pricks, if I calibrated when my BG was changing, I would expect my finger prick to be different to Libre which kind of defeats the purpose of calibration.
    I could base this on the Libre arrows but I find it easier to fit it into my life if I calibrate at about the same time each day.

    I also find the arrows tend to describe the different between the last two numbers rather than the actual trends. If I look at the individual numbers in detail (Glimp uploads a spreadsheet to DropBox if you want to get into that), my numbers fluctuate within about 0.5mmol/l of the previous value most of the time rather than ever being flat.

    ... so pretty much what @Scott-C said but in different words :)
     
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