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Glycogen Depletion = Fat Store Usage + Glucose Spike?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Brendon.Dean, Sep 10, 2018.

  1. Brendon.Dean

    Brendon.Dean Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hey everyone! I took a break from the forums here because I realized I was being a bit of a ******** and close minded which wasn't cool... So I'm truly sorry for that if it effected you.

    With that said I've gone through a bunch of type 1 diabetes related books and learnt a lot. I didn't realize how much misinformation I was given prior to reading and how naive and again, close minded I was.

    What I'm realizing and I think this statement is correct based on what I have read and the information I've gathered from personal experience testing on myself but if I can get some 'believable' people to respond it would be greatly appreciated.

    Statement: During type 2a (80%), 2b (90%), or 2x (100%) maximum exertion exercise, once glycogen stores are depleted, my body resorts to pulling energy from stored fat cells to get energy to my muscles. This process results in a blood glucose spike NOT BECAUSE OF HORMONAL RESPONSE (IE. epinephrine) but because of stored fat being converted into energy for the body to use in order to try and maintain performance.

    MY EXPERIENCE THAT REINFORCES ABOVE STATEMENT

    From what I gather, after 100 minutes of ice hockey while fasting I always have glucose spike from 5.0 mmol/L prior to skating to around 11.0-14.0 mmol/L post skate. So far correcting this blood glucose has been tricky because blood sugars drop significantly with minimal insulin which to me indicates it was not a hormonal response but a glycogen dump from fat storage.

    Prior to 100 minutes of ice hockey, having eaten a Ketogenic meal consisting of 16g carbohydrates blood sugar stays the same prior and post skate at usually 5.6 mmol/L and raises to about 8 mmol/L 2-3 hours post skate (This response I believe might be hormonal) due to the fact that when trying to correct this blood glucose my body is more insulin resistant which is a precursor of a hormonal response in the body as described in the book "Diabetic Athletes Handbook".


    I also experience similar results when completing 2a, 2b and 2x weight training (60-90 minutes). On fasted training blood glucose will rise from anywhere from 4.0 mmol/L to as high as 12.5 mmol/L based on my level of exertion and correcting blood glucose is very effective post workout.

    When I eat a ketogenic meal 16g carbohydrates prior to completing a 2a, 2b, and 2x weight training session (60-90 minutes) there is extreme risks on low blood sugar even at minimal insulin dosages of 1 U AND post workout I experience a varying blood glucose response between 6.0 mmol/L to 11 mmol/L with varying levels of insulin resistance (some times not resistant and sometimes resistant).


    What are your thoughts on my highlighted statement?
     
  2. QPR4Me

    QPR4Me Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't know any of the fancy stuff. However, I took up jogging earlier this year aged 59. I did the natural thing of not taking insulin before I went out, thinking that it would cause a hypo when I used up my energy reserves.
    Of course that was complete BS and I found that a) my running was abysmal and b) I too got a spkie in my blood sugar levels after the run.
    Simple answer, for me, was to have a slightly reduced insulin dose before I went running (before breakfast) and carry a few Jellybabies with me, just in case.
    Bingo, a big improvement in my running and stability with my sugar levels. Have not needed to reach for the Jellybabies on any run!
     
  3. EllsKBells

    EllsKBells Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Purely anecdotally, this would make sense. I have recently taken up Pilates, which would seem to inspire much less of an adrenaline response than ice hockey, yet can produce a spike up to the mid to high teens, particularly if there has been a significant cardio component
     
  4. Brendon.Dean

    Brendon.Dean Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    So when you say 'significant cardio component' are you referring to something of high enough intensity to make you breathe heavier?

    I can also see what you mean how it can be purely anecdotal too.
     
  5. Brendon.Dean

    Brendon.Dean Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for sharing! Can you recall how intense the cardio was? I'm recognizing a significant pattern in exertion level in terms of how the body responds and our glucose shifts.
     
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