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HbA1C Frequency & Appointment Responsibility

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by 5c0ut, Sep 8, 2017.

  1. 5c0ut

    5c0ut Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi,

    I was diagnosed Type 2 about 18 months ago and have followed advice on this forum adopting a LCHF diet which has resulted in weight loss of about 30lb and feeling a lot better and fitter.

    My last HbA1C result was 42 (down from 99 at diagnosis) but this test was approaching 12 months ago.

    How often should I have a HbA1C blood test and who is responsible for arranging this? Is it my responsibility to contact my GP and make arrangements or should my GP send out a reminder?

    Sent from my SM-G920F using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
  2. Enclave

    Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member
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    My diabetes nurse sends out appointments for the blood tests and meetings. Have a word with your Drs and ask them, as I think it will be different for different surgeries.
     
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  3. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    12 months is often the frequency for those with good control.

    I am still on 6 month checks, but it really depends on your surgery.

    If in doubt, give them a nudge.
    It is your health so you have the first line of responsibility.
    I would have thought that at only 18 months in you should still be checked every 6 months but they may have decided that you are doing everything right.
     
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  4. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi @Sc0ut ,

    It's worth chasing your HCPs up for an appointment..
    Some go for checks as frequently as every 6 months? (Someone kick me if I'm wrong?)

    Well done on the last A1c improvement!
     
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  5. DeejayR

    DeejayR Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi. Well done on that result. That makes you prediabetic but still on the radar of your GP. You should be called up for another HbA1C when the 12 months are up, but ask now anyway to make sure. There is a 12-point charter of care we are entitled to from the NHS which includes retinal and peripheral neuropathy tests (eyes and feet, basically). You should also have a print-out or online details available of all your surgery tests. Keep up the good work.
     
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  6. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I set of on 3monthy checks for 12 months told by my GP to make my own appointments every 3 months then dropped to 6 months still make my own apps. Now on every 12 months (for last 3 years) with a reminder letter from the surgery to make an appointment
     
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  7. 5c0ut

    5c0ut Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thanks for the replies everyone.

    I only realised that I was over due following my registering with Patient Access so that I can see my medical records.

    I did call the GP surgery but they seemed to avoid my questions focusing on getting an appointment booked going forward.

    I think that as I'm feeling better these days that blood tests were the last thing on my mind.

    I'll discuss with the Nurse when I see her in a couple of weeks but I was just interested in in how this was managed by/for others in my situation.

    Thanks again for your replies.
     
  8. DeejayR

    DeejayR Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    • I dug this out from three years ago when it was given me. It seems to have grown a bit to 15 points. But not all apply, assuming you're not pregnant, for example; and the education course can be avoided. For "diabetic healthcare team" a hollow laugh may suffice.

      THE CARE YOU SHOULD RECEIVE

      There is a minimum level of healthcare that every person with diabetes deserves and should expect. Here are the 15 essential checks and services you should receive. If you aren’t getting all the care you need, take this checklist to your diabetes healthcare team and discuss it with them.
      1 Get your blood glucose levels measured at least once a year. An HbA1c blood test will measure your overall blood glucose control and help you and your diabetes healthcare team set your own target.
      2 Have your blood pressure measured and recorded at least once a year, and set a personal target that is right for you.
      3 Have your blood fats (such as cholesterol) measured every year. Like blood glucose levels and blood pressure, you should have your own target that is realistic and achievable.
      4 Have your eyes screened for signs of retinopathy every year. A special digital camerais used to take a photograph of your retina (at the back of your eye) and a specialist will look for any changes. This free test is part of the annual diabetic screening service and is different to the checks carried out by an optician. If you notice any changes between appointments it is important to contact your optometrist or GP.
      5 Have your feet checked. The skin, circulation and nerve supply of your feet should be examined annually. You should be told if you have any risk of foot problems, how serious they are and if you will be referred to a specialist podiatrist or specialist foot clinic.
      6 Have your kidney function monitored annually. You should have two tests for your kidneys: urine test for protein (a sign of possible kidney problems) and a blood test to measure kidney function.
      7 Have your weight checked and your waist measured to see if you need to lose weight.
      8 Get support if you are a smoker including advice and support on how to quit. Having diabetes already puts people at increased risk of heart disease and stroke, and smoking further increases this risk.
      9 Receive care planning to meet your individual needs. You live with diabetes every day so you should have a say in every aspect of your care. Your yearly care plan should be agreed as a result of a discussion between you and your diabetes healthcare team, where you talk about your individual needs and set targets.
      10 Attend an education course to help you understand and manage your diabetes. You should be offered and have the opportunity to attend courses in your local area.
      11 Receive care from a specialist paediatric team if you are a child or young person.
      12 Receive high quality care if admitted to hospital. If you have to stay in hospital, you should still continue to receive high-quality diabetes care from specialist diabetes healthcare professionals, regardless of whether you have been admitted due to your diabetes or not.
      13 Get information and specialist care if you are planning to have a baby as your diabetes control has to be a lot tighter and monitored very closely. You should expect care and support from specialist healthcare professionals at every stage from preconception to post-natal care.
      14 See specialist diabetes healthcare professionals to help you manage your diabetes. Diabetes affects different parts of the body and you should have the opportunity to see specialist professionals such as an ophthalmologist, podiatrist or dietitian.
      15 Get emotional and psychological support. Being diagnosed with diabetes and living with a long term condition can be difficult. You should be able to talk about your issues and concerns with specialist healthcare professionals.
     
  9. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    My surgery calls me in first for a blood test with an assistant, who does the weighing, blood pressure, takes the blood etc. The results are on line next day. This is every 6 months. I then see the nurse once a year for feet, more blood pressure etc and a chat. She calls me in.
     
  10. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    My blood tests are on a three monthly basis. I mention it to my GP when they are due and he gives me a blood test request form for whatever tests he want's me to have from the local pathology shop down the road from where I live at the private hospital.

    I now have hba1c tested every six months.
     
  11. ally1

    ally1 Type 2 · Expert

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    When first diagnosed as type2, I had six monthly test now it's every year. Generally my surgery send me an appointment
     
  12. Art Of Flowers

    Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    When I have an appointment with the diabetes nurse I get a blood test form for three months time. You can just turn up for the blood test on one of three days per week.

    When I have a blood test I make an appointment to see the diabetes nurse a week or so later. The health centre I visit is where the blood tests are done and where I see the diabetes nurse.
     
  13. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    I think you will find that the frequency you are called in depends on the previous HbA1c readings, and control over blood glucose.

    For example, someone newly diagnosed with unstable blood glucose and medication that is being adjusted, would be called in much more frequently than someone who has shown steady levels and consistent medication needs for some time.

    I would suggest that anyone with any concerns or concerning symptoms should arrange to see a doc or nurse immediately. Just because things have been under control for a while doesn't mean they can't go pearshaped, and if you are on an annual review frequency, then it could be a very long wait before the problem is identified, if we just sit back and wait to be called in.

    Personally, I have little faith in the calling in system, having been 'forgotten' on several occasions for things like HbA1cs, smears and OGTTs. So I just set up diary reminders for myself nowadays, and ring up and query, if the gap has been too long. But I do appreciate that surgeries, technology and pressure for them to achieve recall/review targets mean that things are more reliable than they used to be.
     
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