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High meter reading

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Cenakissy, Apr 25, 2017.

  1. Cenakissy

    Cenakissy Type 2 · Member

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    Hi guys, so I have read alot of stuff how to increase your blood glucose levels quickly if they are too low, but is there anything you can eat/do to lower them if they are too high? I've been trying to cut down the carbs but I'm really struggling. Losing weight and changing your eating habits is not as easy as I thought it would be.
     
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  2. not-so-lucky

    not-so-lucky Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Personal experience has been a 25 minute walk tends to drop me 4mmol - But everyone's biology is different.... Drinking water can help and isn't invasive....

    EDIT

    Drinking plenty of water each day is good for the body on any level; but worth a shot... My B/Sugar's tend to have a mind of their own ;)
     
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  3. mentat

    mentat Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, exercise is often a good way to lower BG levels. However, sometimes the stress of exercise increases BG levels so be sure to monitor this. Drinking water helps because when sugar levels are particularly high the kidneys start to filter glucose into the urine, and extra water helps.

    My advice with regards to diet change is to make a significant cut to carbs, stick it out for at least a week, and avoid sweeteners and intensely satisfying foods. Our brains and bodies take a while to adjust their expectations, but it does happen. After a while without those rushes of carbs or sweetness or other "flavour hits", you will find that you actually feel quite satisfied with a simple, low-carb meal.

    Unfortunately I am noticing a trend with restaurants and food outlets making their food more satisfying and addictive. Even if it's low in carbs and fat it will create hunger and cravings later. If you start paying attention and avoid this kind of food you should find it easier to maintain a healthy diet.
     
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  4. Cenakissy

    Cenakissy Type 2 · Member

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    I had my second visit today since being diagnosed, she changed the dose of the gliclazide from 60 MG once a day to twice daily. She also added Rosuvastatin 10 MG due to extremely high cholesterol and will be adding hypertension medicine in two weeks. I have switched to sugar twin for my coffee instead of sugar and am watching the carbs :)
     
  5. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    How closely are you watching the carbs? Watching them often isn't enough. You need to count how many grams you eat each meal, and use a meter to test your reaction. Test before you eat and again 2 hours after first bite. Keep a food diary including portion sizes and record your levels alongside. Look at the rise from before to after and try to keep this under 2mmol/l. (preferably less). More than that and there are too many carbs in that meal so you need to eliminate some or reduce portion sizes.

    You do need to test regularly on Gliclazide otherwise you may go too low and hypo. Gliclazide stimulates the pancreas to produce extra insulin, and this extra is not needed if the carbs are low. Less carbs = less insulin required. Too much insulin and your levels drop, so you need to be careful.
     
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  6. Cenakissy

    Cenakissy Type 2 · Member

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    I'm keeping track of all foods on an app called spark people. The doctor told me I don't need to check my blood sugar levels. I totally plan on keeping up with the monitoring as well because I thought that was incredibly stupid. She also said I have high protein in my urine but didn't elaborate on it. She's good at saying this or that is wrong or right but not so helpful with explanations.
     
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  7. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    doctors always seem to say that, but logically everyone can figure out that if one does not measure one can not have a true control of glucose numbers... and type 2 diabetics that keep their levels under 7.5mmol and even lower like in non-diabetic area under 6mmol do get much less trouble with heart and the whole cardivascular system and all the other adding terrible conditions... so why on earth should we not measure our blood glucose levels to keep control...

    to tell people not to is a reminisence from old days where diabetes type 2 was seen as an ever progressing disease that was best to calm people down in worries of as nothing seemed to really prevent the decline in health..
    there is lots of statistic nowadays showing that a tight control does do a gigantic difference if one succeed in keeping levels low ... and preferably lower than 6mmol in average

    DO MEASURE YOUR BLOOD GLUCOSE NO MATTER WHAT THE DOCTOR SAYS

    http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14045678.php
     
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    #7 Freema, Apr 26, 2017 at 8:12 PM
    Last edited: May 7, 2017
  8. Cenakissy

    Cenakissy Type 2 · Member

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    I plan to keep at it, between the diabetes, high cholesterol and stage two hypertension I am extremely terrified of what comes next if I don't pay attention. We die young in this family. My brother died of a heart attack when he was 48, he had never smoked or drank a day in his life. My mother died of cancer but had high blood pressure as long as I can remember she was 64 and my dad had type 2 diabetes but didn't look after himself and in the end he got very sick and all his organs shut down, he was 56. I'm 44 and would like to be around when my grandsons hit their teenage years to watch and laugh at my son :) :)
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  9. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Lol. Being a grandparent is the best ever revenge on the children.

    I wish you luck and hope you are around to see your grandchildren's children.
     
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  10. Rosalie_900

    Rosalie_900 Prediabetes · Member

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    Almonds are supposed to help reduce blood sugars. I am wondering if almond milk does too. Certainly cutting out cow's milk should help. I was amazed how many carbs are in a latte. The Alpro unsweetened almond milk is quite acceptable.
    Cutting carbs is much easier once you find ways of increasing your fat intake ( cream, olive oil and butter). Although they are high in calories they make you feel satisfied sooner and you won't pig out on them as you might on carbs.
     
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  11. Dinkeroon

    Dinkeroon · Member

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    In my experience I would say add some Cinnamon to your diet it helps a great deal with your blood sugars.
    Have a read about it first and you will see, I get mine from Healthspan.
     
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  12. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    I wouldn't be where I am today if I'd listened to doctors. Get a meter and test you know it makes sense.

    In fact the day I was diagnosed officially. I was told not to test. Within an hour I was at home trying out my brand new Gluco RX meter.

    Regards John

    edit bit late joining this thread I now realise but what I said I believe is still relevant even though the op has probably had a meter for a while now.
     
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    #12 JohnEGreen, May 6, 2017 at 9:36 PM
    Last edited: May 6, 2017
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