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How do you describe to loved ones what it feels like when things are bad?

Discussion in 'Emotional and Mental Health' started by Mattbald, Mar 16, 2020.

  1. Mattbald

    Mattbald Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi, just after some advice on how different people let their loved ones know how & when they’re feeling pretty ****?
    My glucose levels have been pretty bad over the last couple of days, struggled to get them below 14 & at one point they were 26, which has really taken it out of my physical & mentally. I’ve not eaten at all really & don’t want to as my levels will skyrocket.

    When I’m like that I just need time to stop & rest but I don’t want to look like I’m just being lazy. I feel like I need to justify why i need some time out but I can’t explain to my partner how it makes me feel & how draining it can be.
    We have two boys, 22 months & 3.5 years old, which adds some complications too. Thanks

    Edited by mod to removed thinly disguised expletive.
     
    • Hug Hug x 3
    #1 Mattbald, Mar 16, 2020 at 4:10 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 17, 2020
  2. Outlawe

    Outlawe Type 1.5 · Member

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    Hello - my advice would be to explain to your partner in the same way that you've written this post. When sugars are erratic/running constantly high you have to admit that you are 'ill'. Do you have the support of a Diabetes Specialist Nurse? If so, as you are hitting 26, my recommendation would be to call him/her for some advice on how to get your sugars stable again. When I have this problem, I've found that not eating is not the answer because the body will pump out 'emergency carbs' into your blood stream and if you are also not taking insulin this will make things worse. Hope you feel well again soon
     
  3. Bufger

    Bufger Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi Matt,

    I also have two young boys that are 18 months apart in age and it is difficult for the family unit. Absolute chaos in the house and if I am unwell i'm useless. The problem is that pre-diabetes and family I was really lazy and my partner knew me back then so I also worry about how i'm percieved!

    I make sure I look after her when she is ill and I tell her outright when i'm running high (or show her). I've told her it feels like you have the flu (aching, heavy limbs, lathargic) without the other symptoms so she has some idea of what its like. She can also tell without me checking BG as i do get really grumpy!

    So in short - i overcompensate when i'm healthy so when I am ill, she knows i need space.
     
  4. PaddyM

    PaddyM · Newbie

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    Hi Matt I've been type1 for 57years and as a child was referred to as a brittle diabetic meaning my readings were (and still are!) forever yo-yoing up and down . I find it exhausting in every way,it makes me weak and tired and stressed, feeling that I'm under deep water, can't move,hear,see or speak properly. Very frightening and almost impossible to convey to a non diabetic or even a well controlled one!
     
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