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In shock - HbA1c reading down to 40. In remission?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by CESM, Jul 10, 2020.

  1. CESM

    CESM · Active Member

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    I’ve just been given the results of my latest HbA1c blood test. In December 2019 my HbA1c was 57 and I was diagnosed as type 2. I didn’t start on any medication as I hoped to reverse it by diet. However, in March 2020 my HbA1c shot up to 135 and my GP assumed that my pancreas had stopped working and I was re-diagnosed as type 1 and put onto insulin straight away (which I’m still taking). When the GAD test results came back they showed that my pancreas is still working so I was once again diagnosed as type 2. My next HbA1c blood test, in May, showed the reading had dropped to 85 and I was set a target of HbA1c of 50 and 3 x day blood sugar readings of 5-7.9. Im always well within this range, and often in the low 4 point something so my insulin dose has been steadily reduced every week or two. Today the GP receptionist told me my latest HbA1c is just 40. I’m in shock, as I hadn’t expected such a dramatic drop from 135 in so few weeks. My results haven’t yet been seen by my diabetes nurse or my GP, but does the level of 40 mean that I’m in remission?
     
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  2. Caprock94

    Caprock94 · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like it to me! What change did you make to your diet? Low carb? Did you lose weight? Well done!
     
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  3. CESM

    CESM · Active Member

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    I actually can’t believe it, not until I’ve spoken to my diabetes nurse. I have changed my diet, but not drastically. I’ve reduced the amount of carbs I eat but still have the odd slice of toast and bowl of porridge. I’ve actually put weight back on, which I’m annoyed about. I was warned that might happen when I started on insulin, and it did. Then, with being shielded (diabetes, asthma & hypertension) Boris & co. put the fear of God in me and I’ve hardly been out. In total I’ve put on 8lbs, I’m ashamed to say, but am working on getting it back off. Perhaps the lower HbA1c level is due to the higher than usual gin and (diet) tonic intake .
     
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  4. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @CESM,

    Brilliant results and really well done. This is quite an achievement and you ought to be really be proud of this, especially coming from an HbA1c of 135 mmol.

    Generally, remission is defined a blood sugars below 48 mmol (you've done this) and on no medication other than metformin (though some would argue remission is normal blood sugar levels (below 42 mmol) and no diabetes-related medications at all). So, almost there.

    So, congrats again on an absolutely fabulous result.
     
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  5. Caprock94

    Caprock94 · Well-Known Member

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    I read the article and it is an interesting debate on the biggest factor (low carb vs weight loss). I agree with the article and that the switch to low carb can yield fast results, but I think the weight loss is also important. After diagnosis, I went low carb and dropped my weight from 225 pounds to 190. For a while now I have been back up to about 198. I would like to get below 190, but I seem to be able to handle more carbs at 198 than 225.
     
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  6. CESM

    CESM · Active Member

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    Thank you for your kind words. I’m looking forward to hearing from a nurse or doctor about whether I need to continue taking insulin. I’m hoping I can come off of it.
     
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  7. CESM

    CESM · Active Member

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    I’m one of the mesh injured women that are being written and talked about since the report by Baroness Cumberledge was published yesterday, 9 July. I’m convinced that all the infections I’ve had since the mesh was inserted, including permanent facial paralysis that was thought to be caused by a virus, internal abscesses, high infection markers in my blood (including markers that could indicate cancer and particularly of the pancreas), and now this sudden onset of diabetes and its seeming remission, are all caused by the degradation of the plastic inside my body. How I prove it, I don’t know, but I’m not going to give up - I just don’t yet know where to start.
     
  8. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    If you are still taking insulin then no.
    Your therapy is obviously working to bring blood sugars lower but remission is really only counted when unmedicated or on metformin only.
    I'm sure you'll get there though.
     
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  9. CESM

    CESM · Active Member

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    Thank you! I have to hope I can maintain it.
     
  10. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well you are well on your way but I don't think you can really say you are in remission while on any insulin.

    When first diagnosed I was pretty keen on the idea of remission but I have come to accept that I will have to keep my carb intake very low so remission isn't the same as cure. I have pretty much accepted I will never be able to go back to the way I used to eat. Some days it really bothers me but not on a daily basis anymore.

    I can't ever see a time when I won't test regularly if only to prevent carb creep. So remission probably means a bit less to me now than it used to. Having said that my levels are all in the normal range with no medication except metformin so I shouldn't get any of the complications that come with diabetes so that is a win!
     
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  11. Krystyna23040

    Krystyna23040 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I absolutely agree with you.

    Through low carb I came off insulin and was in remission for over 2 years and I am now diabetes resolved - which definitely does not mean diabetes cured as to stay diabetes resolved I cannot go above 20g carb ever.

    I am happy with that as being low carb/keto since 2016 I have grown to really love low carb food. If course the most important thing is that with normal blood sugars we avoid the side effects of diabetes.
     
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  12. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I agree that you cannot say or believe you are in remission when still on insulin. It is probably the insulin that allows you to tolerate more carbs and if you come off it, you would have to reduce those extra carbs you are getting used to. Your doctor/nurse may also be correct in saying the weight gain is due to being on insulin when your pancreas already produces insulin. Insulin is a fat carrying hormone, and is likely to encourage weight gain if you have too much of it circulating round your system. This is how insulin resistance is thought to start - too much of it circulating, so your cells develop resistance to it. Insulin resistance is not a good thing, for anyone.

    Having said all that, a drop to an HbA1c of 40 is brilliant. Well done. :)
     
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  13. Perminder1

    Perminder1 · Well-Known Member

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    I went from 96 HbAC1 in March 20 to 40 July 20... hard work diet exercise determination with a little help from metoformin lost 3.5 stone on weight yes it can be done welldone
     
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