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Insulin & headaches + migraines

Discussion in 'Type 2 with Insulin' started by CESM, Jun 6, 2020.

  1. CESM

    CESM Type 2 · Active Member

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    I’m on two types of insulin for my recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Since taking insulin my blood sugars have dropped dramatically and my 3 x daily readings are within 4.2 to 6 before each mealtime, so are within the 5 to 7.9 target set by my diabetes nurse (my doses have just been reduced to try and get me up to 5 from 4.2-4.6 readings). However, since I’ve started on insulin I’m getting a lot of migraines, which I used to suffer from for years but which dropped off for the last 5-6 years prior to diagnosis, and I’m also getting a lot more “normal” headaches. Is this something that often happens when people start to take insulin? If it is common, do the headaches and migraines stop when our bodies get used to the insulin?
     
  2. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I just googled it. Some interesting reading. Are you using any type of diet to control your diabetes?
     
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  3. CESM

    CESM Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi, what did you Google? I’ve tried Googling for information but didn’t find anything that answered my question. Re diet, I’m following a lower carb healthy eating diet similar to what I always ate so my diet hasn’t changed dramatically.
     
  4. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I googled insulin headaches and insulin migraine.

    What are you eating in a typical day?
     
  5. CESM

    CESM Type 2 · Active Member

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    Eating so many different things: lots of different vegetables (both root & green) & salad items, protein including eggs, fish and meat, also berry fruits, apples & tomatoes, baked beans some days, 2 slices of bread, full fat yogurt - these are all typical daily foods. This morning was a good blood sugar reading then for breakfast eggs, bacon, tomatoes, slice of toast & cup of tea followed 2 hours later by migraine whilst out for a walk so I’d eaten well and should have been hydrated. The migraines don’t seem to follow a pattern.
     
  6. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As a T2 there are items in your food list that I would find problematic. The problems would be caused by underground vegies, apples, baked beans, bread/toast.

    I am going to point you to dietdoctor.com have a read around it is very informative.

    I can't tell you what to do. However, if these headaches and migrains are a real problem, I would talk to the nurse about going on a really low carb diet (keto in my case) and ditching the insulin.
     
  7. Struma

    Struma Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I wonder if you need to look to something simpler.
    Status of hydration.
    At diagnosis, when the blood numbers are high, blood is viscous. You may be having more frequent micturition.
    If you have no problems such as heart failure, effusions of any description, renal insufficiency, grossly oedematous legs, then consider your fluids. Best practice is always seek medical advice before making changes.
    For good health, we need a regular, good supply of fluid in. Perhaps an average of 2000ml intake, spread during the day.
    Cautionary note - any alcohol may exacerbate any headaches.
     
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  8. CESM

    CESM Type 2 · Active Member

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    Your point about fluids is interesting. Prior to diagnosis I was drinking for England, I was so thirsty all the time. Now I find I’m not thirsty and thinking about how much fluid I now intake daily it’s now actually very low, nowhere near 2000ml daily. I’ll make a conscious effort to increase my intake as dehydration could be a cause. Thank you for your input.
     
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  9. CESM

    CESM Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thank you for the link to dietdoctor.com, I’ll follow it up.

    Because the hospital won’t see me because of Covid I haven’t had all the help and advice I should have had soon after diagnosis. I’ve asked my diabetes nurse about diet and have been told to not worry at the moment about what to eat and to not carb count yet, although I have reduced my carb intake. I’d love to come off insulin, but I’ve been told that I’ve got to have this discussion with the hospital when I eventually get my appointment there. It’s very frustrating.
     
  10. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    When I was diagnosed I was told that I would probably have to go on insulin. At that time we had a diabetic dog. I thought blow that.

    When I went back for a follow up appointment, I told the nurse I was going to try a low carb diet, I didn't mention keto.

    I had an unexpected hba1c 5 months later and tried to wriggle out of it, they insisted. The result was 35. I had been recording my food and readings on the mysugr app. A month prior, it had estimated hba1c at 37.

    Months later, I read somewhere that dropping levels that fast could have a bad effect on my kidneys. Fortunately for me that didn't happen.
     
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