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Libre numbers out

Discussion in 'Blood Glucose Monitoring' started by h4kr, Feb 2, 2018.

  1. h4kr

    h4kr Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    So I put a new libre on tonight and it is way off compared to bloods. This happened about 3 units ago on one of my daughters sensors.
    I emailed Abbott the last time and they fobbed me off with ‘timing’ issues. By the time we I finished email exchanges the sensor had expired.
    Anyway.. I’ve had this one on for a few hours and it’s consistently showing @2mmol lower than bloods..
    anyone else experience this?
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Did you put it in 24 hours prior to making it live?
     
  3. h4kr

    h4kr Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    ? No.. I just use straight away after 60 minutes.
    Just done my daughters night check and had a panic!
    We have always used an hour after applying.. are readings really that inaccurate for 24 hours?
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  4. h4kr

    h4kr Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Question: so do you apply 24 hours before activating ?
     
  5. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Have you checked that lo with a blood test?
     
  6. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    It is advised to put in 24 hours before old one runs out as it still lasts the whole 14 days as its not active until you activate it..

    Yes,it can be consuderably inaccurate deoending really how quick and up and down the readings are going...
     
  7. h4kr

    h4kr Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah.. blood test was 6.9, second image above).
    Think this is possibly duff?
    Level and low.. but bloods are 8.4
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  8. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @h4kr, when you apply a new sensor, although it's painless, you're basically assaulting your arm with a big needle and leaving the sensor filament inside you. The body does what it's meant to do: it sends a small army of repair cells to tidy up the damage, and defence cells to try to get rid of the filament, which is regarded as a foreign body which shouldn't be there.

    Those cells chew up a lot of glucose - an army marches on its stomach - so they eat the glucose before it can be measured.

    Your bg is fine elsewhere, but locally at the insertion area appears low until things settle down.

    That's why most users attach in advance before activating. We've got a 60 min start up, but the American version has a 12 hour start up for exactly this reason, to allow settling before getting readings.

    There's a paper on the subject which says this:

    "....sensor insertion causes trauma to the insertion site. It can disrupt the tissue structure, provoking an inflammatory reaction that can consume glucose followed by a repair process. The interaction of the sensor with the traumatized microenvironment warrants the need for a waiting period for the sensor signal to stabilize, and that period varies depending on the sensor type."

    www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2903977/
     
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  9. h4kr

    h4kr Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you very much.. this makes perfect sense! Diabetes is a learning curve :)
     
  10. Olufisayo

    Olufisayo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What is Libre? I don’t understand it
     
  11. KenBachelor

    KenBachelor Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The Freestyle Libre is a continuous glucose monitoring system, that was approved by NICE last November for issue to some insulin dependant diabetics (T1?) on the NHS, although the expenditure still needs to be approved by the local CCG's. My consultant told me last week that the majority of CCG's are likely to approve them over the next few months, but most are still drawing up their own rules on who to.
     
  12. h4kr

    h4kr Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Beds CCG are not prescribing. They are awaiting clinical trial data from other ccgs first.
     
  13. ECDRUM

    ECDRUM Type 1 · Active Member

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    This is a real post code lottery. Ironically in many areas diabetics who have self funded and who have improved their fly action levels substantially cannot get Libre on prescription ‘because they are too well’.
    Write to your MP, write to your local CCG and sign the on line parliamentary petition to get this universally available to type 1 diabetics.
     
  14. ECDRUM

    ECDRUM Type 1 · Active Member

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    Above should read glycation levels
     
  15. h4kr

    h4kr Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    So has this been approved by the nhs? And each ccg is allowed to decide? Surely one trial and then a overall decision would be make more sense? Or does it not work this way?
     
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