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Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by farheen123, Jun 22, 2019.

  1. farheen123

    farheen123 Type 1 · Member

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    Hi all,
    I got diagnosed with Type 1 about like a month ago with my blood sugar through the roof ( stays within 300-400 ) so I've been put on a healthy diet plan which includes 0 sugar, basically food made at home except for rice/potatoes/white bread etc. I've been advised to exercise for about an hour each day, and given a proper routine to follow, I also inject myself with insulin 3 times a day.
    It does get super overwhelming at times, but this week I've gotten super irresponsible and I'm afraid its gonna mess with my progress. I was wondering if anyone has any advice for me to stick to a schedule (I'm a night owl :( )and get back on track?

    Sorry for the very long thread
     
  2. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    One option is to read the book or ebook Dr Bernstein's Diabetes Solution.
    The diet part is perhaps an extension of what youbare doing but thevadvice is to do this approach, if you decide on it, with the input of your doctor and nurse, particularly in regards to insulin doses. And also read dietdoctor.com if you decide to go very low carb, such as < 30 g carbs per day.
    Best Wishes with whatever you decide.
     
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  3. JAT1

    JAT1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Fundamentally diabetes is an exercise in self-discipline and self-knowledge. Fear of complications keeps me on track. Are you on a basil/bolus plan?
     
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  4. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the club. There is good news it gets easier over time. It will become a minor inconvenience within about a year.
     
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  5. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    There’s another book, ‘Think Like a Pancreas’ by Gary Scheiner that might help too. It’s available online and Amazon kindle - you can get an app if you haven’t got a kindle reader. Scheiner looks at how to balance carbohydrate with insulin. He began as a BAD T1 but turned himself around through knowledge of how best to run the T1 beast.
    It’s basically gaining knowledge about how much insulin you need for a measure of carbohydrate. We’re all different and seem to need a very varied amount so it’s good to learn your own.
    Have you come across the devices that measure interstitial blood glucose and provide a readout of your levels through the day? I use a Freestyle Libre, produced by Abbott. Some people use a Dexcom.
     
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  6. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Chowie, I'm not sure I agree with that statement. For some maybe but a 'minor inconvenience'??, hardly. I get that many people may think of it like this but even when it's well controlled it can still be a lifetime of massive INconvenience. Just my opinion though and saying that to people might be setting them up for disappointment.
     
  7. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    After a good while it becomes a habit, as does the inventive swearing when it needs more attention. Yes, it would be great to be without it, and believe me I sincerely wish the T1 witch hadn’t stopped at my door, but since we’re stuck with it it’s only sensible to arm ourselves with as much knowledge and tech as we can to help us to enjoy the day.
     
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  8. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I do agree it becomes a habit but I still wouldn't call it a minor inconvenience, not when it is one never ending round of thinking about food/injections/exercise/hypos/hypers/insulin/doing the job of a pancreas/possible associated health issues. Maybe I'm in the minority here and I know that nobody was dismissing this horrible disease but minor it ain't. x
     
  9. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    No, it isn’t ‘minor’ but a newbie needs to know that it’s doable, which it is. It does impact on our lives, and like I said, I’d love not to have it, but luckily there are many more things to ease our way than there were 49 years ago when I was diagnosed.
     
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  10. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Expert

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    I would say testing and injecting is as inconvenient as cleaning my teeth every morning and night.
    High and low BG when I carb miscount or do a different type of exercise or get ill or have a stressful meeting is beyond inconvenient. Over time, I have got used to managing these highs and lows but that doesn't make them good.
     
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  11. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    What kind of schedule are you looking for?
    My own 'schedule' consists of testing and injecting before eating, preferably another test a couple of hours after food to see if a correction with food or insulin is needed and taking my long acting insulin around midnight.
    The long acting is the only part of diabetes I try to do at the same time every day, the rest varies a lot.
     
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  12. farheen123

    farheen123 Type 1 · Member

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    I'm starting to slowly understand that. Nope, not on a basal/bolus plan, I'm on a fixed insulin amount through pen before every meal
     
  13. farheen123

    farheen123 Type 1 · Member

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    Oh I'll have to check that out! Nope, I don't think any of those continuous monitoring devices and available where I live, or will I haven't found them yet. They look pretty convenient tho
     
  14. farheen123

    farheen123 Type 1 · Member

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    Ah at that moment I was struggling with going to bed earlier so I could eat meals at proper times and inject insulin accordingly. I'm struggling with that but that's another problem. I typed it in my question in the spur of the moment
     
  15. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Is that a mixed insulin? What does it say on the pen?
     
  16. farheen123

    farheen123 Type 1 · Member

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    It says Apidra Solostar, 100 units, insulin glulisine. I'm not sure what that means
     
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  17. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Apidra is a typical short acting insulin, taken before meals. Usually T1's on Apidra (or another brand short acting insulin) take a long acting insulin as well. Can you ask your doctor about long acting insulin?
    With T1's diagnosed as adults it can happen the short acting is enough for a while, so it might be that in your case.

    The Apidra is part of the basal/bolus regime. The basal, or long acting to keep you steady in the background, the bolus, or short acting to take with food to help your body use the nutrients in your food and prevent your blood sugar from going high.

    When you get more experience with your diabetes you should be able to figure how much insulin to take for your meals, depending on the amount of carbs. It doesn't really matter at what times you eat, you just take the insulin before your meals.

    Do you have a good doctor or diabetic nurse to go to with your questions? It may be very helpful!

    Good luck!
     
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  18. farheen123

    farheen123 Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you so much!! For the first time I feel like I actually understood something. God bless you! Honestly, you're a gem!!
     
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