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Nicotine could decrease function of the pancreas

Discussion in 'Diabetes News' started by DCUK NewsBot, Oct 19, 2019.

  1. DCUK NewsBot

    DCUK NewsBot · Well-Known Member

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    New research has found that nicotine can have effects on the brain that may impact upon how the pancreas functions. A trial carried out by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai involving rats say consuming nicotine is linked to effects on the pancreas, via a brain circuit. Nicotine, typically present in cigarettes and many vaping liquids, is highly addictive and a harmful ingredient. The researchers report that when inhaled into the body, nicotine makes the pancreas release less insulin which in turn increases blood glucose levels. Even a small rise in blood glucose can be enough to lead to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes if someone is currently at risk of developing the condition. Previous research has shown smoking to be associated with higher rates of type 2 diabetes. The study here suggests that nicotine's effect on the brain could be a key factor. Senior author of the research Dr Paul Kenny, from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, said: "Our findings are important because they describe a mechanism that controls the addictive properties of nicotine and, surprisingly, show that the same addiction-related brain circuits also contribute to smoking-related diseases previously thought to be related to the actions of tobacco outside the brain. "These unexpected findings suggest that at least some of the disease-causing actions of nicotine arise in the brain by the very same circuits that control the addictive properties of the drug. This means that the addictive and disease-causing actions of tobacco may, in some cases, share the very same underlying mechanisms." The findings involve a protein called transcription factor 7-like 2 (Tcf7l2) and the next step will be to see whether the process works in the same way among human beings when nicotine is inhaled through smoking. Dr Nora Volkow, Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, which funded the study, added: "This unanticipated finding suggests a link between nicotine use and the onset of type 2 diabetes, with implications for future prevention and treatment strategies for both diseases. "Although addiction is a brain disease, this discovery underscores how the body's complex functions are exquisitely interconnected, revealing the need for integrated and innovative research." The study is published in the journal, Nature.

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  2. Jo_the_boat

    Jo_the_boat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I understand that nicotine also 'shocks' blood vessels resulting in restricted blood flow.
    Not good for us diabetics for sure who can have existing circulation problems.
     
  3. saaiim

    saaiim · Newbie

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    Yes nicotin is becoming major cause of diabetes and heart problems
     
  4. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    Major cause of lung and other cancers, various COPD's as well remember...
     
  5. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The authors of this study seems to assume that it is too little insulin that leads to T2 diabetes rather than too much insulin (which in turn leads to insulin resistance). Personally, I am not sure I buy into the suggested causal mechanism yet.

    There is a recent article that found that only 6% of T2s already on insulin produce insufficient insulin. Here's the link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1871402119305715?dgcid=rss_sd_all. I also recall another article where researchers artificially reduced the production of insulin in T2, which in turn lead to a reduction in insulin resistance and ultimately lower blood sugars (wished I could link to the article, but unfortunately haven't bookmarked it, don't even remember if the study was in mice or in people). Both of these studies suggests the opposite to the above, i.e. too little insulin isn't the problem in T2.

    Is it feasible that there is some other mechanism linking smoking to T2 (maybe similar pathways for the addiction to nicotine and the addiction to carbs)? Or perhaps healthy user bias? Or might lower insulin production only explains why some people develop T2, but not the majority?
     
    #5 ziggy_w, Dec 13, 2019 at 8:59 PM
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2019
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