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Not happy with surgery - again

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by serenity648, Jun 29, 2017.

  1. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    A HbA1c (IFCC) reading of 49 is still in the diabetic range. Diabetic range is 48 and above, pre-diabetic is 42-47, non-diabetic is below 42. But it is better than your previous readings. You should be able to bring it down to pre-diabetic or non-diabetic range by your next HbA1c test.
    I think this is the chart you are referring to:

    50shades - Copy.png
     
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    #21 Prem51, Jun 30, 2017 at 12:46 PM
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2017
  2. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was merely alluding to the fact that someone has actually gone to the trouble of showing that measuring BG causes patients to stress and it's been used as part of the reason for type IIs not to get any assistance with the cost of test strips. It is very definitely not my opinion so it's probably best to ask the researcher. If I can remember where I read the article, I'll post the URL. As you can well imagine, all the sensible advice is to make good use of the BG meter.
     
  3. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    The problem with sensible use is that even the more enlightened medics that provide meters to non-insulin users is they have little idea how to make good use of them. The first time I saw my lovely nurse and told her about jacket potatoes spiking me, she asked how I knew. I told her about testing before and after meals and looking at the rise, recording it alongside the food eaten and watching for patterns etc. She was genuinely impressed, and admitted she had never heard of this before. She asked about how other foods affected me. She is a very senior prescribing sister with a lot of knowledge about diabetes. She goes on courses etc. The meter in question is one she gave me (after a bit of nagging) although she said she was unable to prescribe strips. I'm certain she would if she could. Now if she had never heard of "food testing", which diabetes nurse has? They are not told about it, not trained in that way, and unless we tell our nurses how we manage the testing, they probably never will know. So most T2s are never told how to make good use of their meter.
     
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  4. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I should have said something along the lines of advice that one gets on Google if you use the key words "why should I monitor BG" or even "should I not monitor". The advice is to use a meter which I think is sensible. I thought "sensible advice was a simpler way of saying all of that.

    I can't remember my last surgery, but my present surgery are pretty good, low carb, use your meter, no you can't have test strips (LOL). I'm presently low carb and no protein (to speak of) and I have the full support of my GP who in fact said I was one of the few patients she could trust to try it along with the chap who is already doing the same.

    I know our local diabetic specialist gets to go on all the training courses given free by the different companies, Abbott have just given her a FreeStyle Libre course. I doubt whether the GPs have the same opportunity though.
     
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  5. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The people who are able and willing to take control of their Type2 are not the people the nurses have most contact with.....
     
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  6. Christine McMillan

    Christine McMillan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If you've had access (or not) to a failing practice, you'll know how * frustrating* everything is. Mine is second to none, but I have a relative at one of a number of failing English practices where I live. Hers is in special measures, has bern for two - three years. People say its a nightmare - my relatibevis too old and frail to keep up with the Press and local talk, but I can certainly believe what this person says. Being Wales I don't know if they have the OFSTED style visits England does. Any chance you can register with another practice?


     
  7. Christine McMillan

    Christine McMillan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ah, not seen this posting. Don't know how you can get on an X-pert diabetic course without a recommendation though. There is a book which is very good but part of the fun was being with others. I went along as a refresher to my newly diagnosed husband
     
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  8. Bill_St

    Bill_St Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I always remember a consultant friend talking about the problems they were having in Cuba over missed diagnosis. He pointed out that Cuba has a very high percentage of GPs - so often they very rarely or even
    never experienced problems common in other countries - they have too few patients.. While I frequently criticise Drs over their lack of knowledge about diabetes and particularly the dogma they spout, I then remember Cuba. The typical U.K. GP has between 1200 and 3000 patients depending on where they are. So how many are T2D, how many are using insulin, how many are T1D - some will only have single figures on their list. And many of us, having spent some years with D have almost given up seeing GP - when I go most of the time is spent with my GP pumping me for information (now mainly about Libre). Remember you live with diabetes 24/7, 365 days a year. Your GP perhaps only deals with it for a few minutes a year. And most of his/ her information is coming or has come from sources that are still committed to ancient dogma. I believe we get the best service from both GP and practice nurses by helping them to understand. If we rush them they will simply become defensive. They might even be delaying so they can read up and ask others for help... ;)
     
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  9. TokSik

    TokSik Type 2 · Member

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    Do a search for "Access to Medical Reports Act 1988" and read up on it to know your full rights to access and read medical reports
     
  10. Duotrans

    Duotrans Type 1 · Member

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    Very frustrating, I'm supposed to phone after 1pm for r silts generally 4-5 days later but fortunately my results are loaded onto PatientView (original Renal Patientview) but now set up to cover Diabetes as well. Generally I can see my blood results within n 24 hours without the hassle of trying to navigate the almighty practice receptionists (to be fair mist of mine are ok)
    Worth speaking to your unit to see if they've signed up.
    http://rixg.org/patientview2/howto/where/
     
  11. Damtov8

    Damtov8 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You need to find out what your rights are under the NHS. They could be breaking the rules by refusing to give you the HB A1 C number over the phone. You may be entitled to it so you need to look online and find out what you are entitled to.
     
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  12. Damtov8

    Damtov8 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This is from the official NHS website:

    Medical records
    Your medical record is a history of your healthcare, including treatments, medication, allergies, test results, X-rays and scans.

    Whenever you visit an NHS service in England a medical record (also called a health record) is created.

    This means medical information about you can be held in various places, such as your GP surgery, dental practice or hospital.

    You have a legal right to apply for access to your medical records. You do not need to give a reason.

    A request for your medical records should be made directly with the healthcare provider that provided the treatment, such as:

    Tell the receptionist that you will file a formal complaint if she will not give you your HbA1c. That usually works.
     
  13. Damtov8

    Damtov8 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    image.jpg
     
  14. Nettysum

    Nettysum · Newbie

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  15. Swiggy

    Swiggy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I bought an extra eat well plate when I did a healthy living programme run by my local council. They were larger than our normal dinner plates and perfect for pizza. Of course that was when I was young and stupid...
     
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  16. Jogreen21

    Jogreen21 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I went to see the nurse on 21st June as I had fallen against my cooker and got hot oil from frying pan on my arm in 2 places and had 2 smallish blisters,after going back and forth to get the dressings changed the blisters had gone and the 2 resulting scabs were dry,on what I thought would be my final visit the nurse (who was a different nurse) said 'I'll just pop this on and it will be fine',the dressing this time was like a big plaster and covered both scabs,2 days later my arm felt hot and sore so I lifted the plaster and both scabs looked nasty,the big plaster had caused both wounds to get damp with no air able to get to them and I ended up at the local hospital at 9pm at night where I was told the other nurse(at my doctors surgery) had put me the wrong dressing on caused infection! I'm back tomorrow with 2wounds 10times worse than they were originally and had both doubled in size and are really sore.i'm gonna put in a complaint when I go back in the morning.i have no confidence in the nurse now and I'm gonna make sure I see a doctor tomorrow.
     
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  17. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If this incident had caused frustration, worry, the additional problem of enduring "a nasty abscess" then tell the surgery. Please. I can only assume that sharing an experience with this forum is for the purposes of seeking opinion and advice. So my advice is tell the surgery, only they will be able to tell you why the incident unfolded the way it did and only the surgery will be able to explain what should happen when waiting for results and only the surgery can make sure it doesn't happen again.

    Why accuse me of being patronising, I do not consider myself superior in any way, form or manner and find your suggestion offensive. I have an opinion which I expressed, if you don't agree that's fine, there's no need to call anyone names.

    "First, you ought know that the A1c3 is basically an on the spot result," I am indeed aware of this test, I'm also aware that my surgery doesn't use them because of cost. I'd be surprised if the lab uses the test where the result is available on the spot, baring in mind the amount of blood they take, and the additional work involved handling my blood for a test my GP or nurse could do in the surgery. Who knows? As for waiting, if your GP says "I want to see the results before you give them to the patient", then that's the way it goes. It's not going to help anyone demanding results, especially the patient. They are not YOUR results, your medical team have done it for their benefit, not yours.

    Best Regards

    Graham
     
  18. Valellie

    Valellie · Newbie

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    I have the same problem when phoning up for my results of a blood test. I was told they couldn't tell me what the numbers were as the results may make me anxious. That alone made me anxious as I defined that as the readings had gone up. When I finally spoke to the doctor my blood/sugar levels had actually gone down quite a bit. I don't understand why they are seeming to want to make a secret if it.
     
  19. micksmixxx

    micksmixxx Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi serenity648,

    Please don't take this the wrong way, but it's irrelevant that the receptionist knows you. She is not a medically qualified person, and even if she were, it would be beyond her remit to discuss medical matters with you. If she had given you 'her opinion', which MAY have been wrong, about your condition, it MAY have caused you more anxiety than you're feeling about the situation.

    In one of your other questions you request a HbA1c chart that shows what the levels mean. Take a look at the following webpage, from this website, that explains HbA1c and shows you a graphic of what the levels indicate. (According to this page, a diabetic should be aiming for a level of 48 mmol/mol and lower.)

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/what-is-hba1c.html

    Take it all in your stride, serenity648, as continued anxiety is likely to increase your blood sugar (glucose) levels, leading to higher HbA1c levels.

    Lots of Love and Light.

    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x

    P.S. Please don't be offended, or alarmed, at the 'x's'. It's merely a logo, of sorts, that I've used for about the last 40 years or so.
     
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  20. masonap

    masonap Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I British but currently I live in Germany, I'm type 2 with insulin and tablets. I had my regular quarterly diabetic check just 2 days ago (here in Germany I do see my regular GP but in reality I rely on my Diabetic specialist Dr for my care and treatment. So this is what happened to me... had my Diabetic appointment Dr Wed morning, appointment at 8am, first of all I saw the nurse for the finger prick test, she also does a second test into something else, its a bit like a test strip but it goes into a special gadget that then is inserted into a machine (I don't see this, I get sent back to the waiting room). Anyway about 45 minutes later (at this point the Dr is already running 'late' and he apologises) I get called into the Dr's office (he has 2 offices so a patient is being seen in one and the next patient is waiting in the second). The test results are on his desk so I have a look, 1st test is the regular fingerprint test (I don't remember what it was, but it isn't important as I do my own tests 4 times a day) the interesting part for me was my HbA1c test which was 5.0 - anyway in comes the Dr and the first thing he says is 5.0 that's great, it's about as perfect as you can get. So I'm a happy bunny, talk about my general results (I download the data from my meter and show him the last 3 months in various reports, graphs, and pie charts) and I'm happily sent on my way with prescriptions for the next 3 months supplies. I'm hoping to retire soon and what I'm not looking forward to is the experience that you've described, I remember many times in the UK waiting a week for results and then the Dr barely mentioning it, my experience here in Germany has opened my eyes so when I do get back to the UK I will have to very carefully select a GP based upon what he/she can do to help me; I'm not a number, I'm not an inconvenience, I'm a person, a valuable member of society, and I want to live healthily for many years to come. Dr's deserve respect for their work, the training they went through for many years etc. but as patients we too deserve to be recognised and treated as humanely as possible.
     
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