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Type 2 Numbers rise at night

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by chipmiller, Feb 7, 2018.

  1. chipmiller

    chipmiller Type 2 · Newbie

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    I'm sure this has been discussed on this forum in the past but, since I'm a newby here, I'll ask anyway.This has happened a number of time and I'm hoping someone can explain it to me.

    I'll wake up at 0230 or 0300 to pee and, as long as I'm up, I'll check my BGL. On several occasions it has been a bit high so I offset it with a few units of Humalog. When I wake up for work at 0600-0630, and do my regular morning check, the reading is even HIGHER than it was earlier. WTH!
     
  2. scoots

    scoots Type 1 · Active Member

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    Mine can do this too- I use an insulin pump, and my highest basal rate is actually the middle of the night/early hours of the morning.

    It may be linked to what you have eaten: a large meal, or one that has more fat in it e.g. takeaway will take a lot longer to digest. If you give insulin to cover the meal, this will cover for say 2 hours whereas the meal might take 4 hours to digest, in which case you BG will increase, sometimes dramatically. With the pump I simply set a long dual wave, so the insulin goes in over a longer period of time. With injections, it might be worth splitting it eg giving some of your insulin initially to cover the meal and then some a little later.

    Your DSN will be able to advise you on this
     
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