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Obesity Diabetes and Dementia

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Art Of Flowers, Mar 25, 2017.

  1. Art Of Flowers

    Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  2. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    Yes sounds sad , really worth excercising and building muscles as that can reduce insuline resistance with as much as 30%
     
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  3. serenity648

    serenity648 · Guest

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  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I wonder how many of those diabetics in the studies were also on statins?
     
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  5. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    Yes, this has been under discussion for quite a while.

    Have a google for Type 3 diabetes, and you will see what I mean. There have been suggestions to re-name Dementia as Type 3 diabetes, although of course Type 3 is already in use for other types of D.
    http://www.alzheimer.ca/en/About-de...ase/Risk-factors/Diabetes-dementia-connection
    This is a good DCUK page which explains it very simply.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/type3-diabetes.html

    I find it rather sad that most of the discussions on the subject link Dementia to obesity, rather than looking at the underlying cause which is insulin resistance and causes both the Dementia and the obesity.
     
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    #5 Brunneria, Mar 25, 2017 at 12:24 PM
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2017
  6. Art Of Flowers

    Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    High blood sugars does cause neuropathy and also seems to affect brain function. I started to take Alpha Lipoic Acid 300Mg tablets recently because I was experiencing some pins and needles in my hand. I did notice that ALA does also improve cognitive function by reducing "brain fog". My memory improved.
     
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  7. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    Yes, the couple of years before I really clamped down and went very low carb are a kind of foggy blur.
    I had always had a great memory. An associative memory, where I would remember things that were happening as I did something else (what I ate while I read a particular passage in a book, or what we talked about when visiting a particular place, and stuff like that). But that completely disappeared. I struggled to learn new things (difficult when starting a new job), and my short term memory was shockingly hopeless. I couldn't remember a list of 3 things, and started writing everything down.

    It took a while, but keeping my bg low and steady has helped a lot of it recover, but I still have memory gaps and vagueness for that 2 year period. I was half way through a book recently before I realised that I had actually read it during my 'foggy years'. Very disturbing.

    All I can say is thank heaven for this forum. Without it, I would still have been blundering about in a kindoflowcarb way, no testing, no very low carb, no supplements, etc. etc.
     
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  8. EllsKBells

    EllsKBells Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Brunneria yes, and also those in the field, as opposed to members of the media, dislike the term 'type 3 diabetes' because it is misleading, and also encourages the bringing of all dementia under one umbrella, when actually they are pathologically distinct diseases.

    SITraN, based in Sheffield, are rather more interested in insulin resistance as a cause of obesity and also dementia, primarily dementia, particularly with regard to Alzheimer's Disease. If you search for papers by Garwood, C., Wharton, S., Chambers, A.L., or Simpson, J., to name but a few, their body of work is gaining quite some traction. They've been on about this for a good few years now, but it is becoming particularly significant in wake of last year's CFAS paper, which showed amyloid beta and tau in people without AD.

    But then of course, promoting low carb high fat would not fit with the general consensus that it is fat that is evil.
     
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  9. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I believe various groups of researchers have noticed the link between insulin resistance/impaired glucose uptake in the brain and dementia/alzheimer for a while...obesity would just be a natural extension of that association.

    Association of Insulin Resistance With Cerebral Glucose Uptake in Late Middle–Aged Adults at Risk for Alzheimer Disease
    http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/2398420
    Can Ketones Help Rescue Brain Fuel Supply in Later Life? Implications for Cognitive Health during Aging and the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease
    http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnmol.2016.00053/full
     
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    #9 kokhongw, Mar 25, 2017 at 1:36 PM
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2017
  10. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    seems people with the specific dementia called alzheimers are lacking omega 3 fatty acids in their brains... maybe some have an inherited higher need for omega 3 fatty acids..or a harder time getting them into their brains., maybe the brain can not use and metabolize the blood glucose if its cells lack these kinds of fatty acids ... mainly found in krill fisk and walnuts

    https://scitechdaily.com/diets-lacking-in-omega-3-fatty-acids-may-cause-your-brain-to-age-faster/
    so even another good reason to eat ones daily krill-oil

    http://www.nutraingredients.com/Research/Omega-3-backed-for-Alzheimer-s-disease-potential
     
    #10 Freema, Mar 26, 2017 at 10:36 AM
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2017
  11. Gannet

    Gannet Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's exactly what I thought!
     
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  12. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    Came across this just now.

    Pretty interesting:
    http://www.tuitnutrition.com/2017/03/alzheimers-diet.html

    Obviously, we are talking human diets here, and human Alzheimers.

    But my experience has been of taking a significantly Alzheimers/Dementia cat of 12 years, and switching him to an All Raw diet, rich in salmon oil and healthy fats (processed pet food is often very carb heavy, and what fat there is, is processed and cheap). He lived another 7 years with minimal further mental deterioration. He had strong claws and a coat than shone like a mirror. Eventually passed away suddenly, with a stroke. I just wished I had been feeding him the Raw stuff before the mental decline began...
     
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  13. Speedbird

    Speedbird Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Now this is interesting. I found this on the Alzheimer's Society

     
  14. NatJS

    NatJS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Do you have detials of the diet you fed you cat? I'd be interested for my own moggie actually!
     
  15. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    @NatJS

    Sure!

    I started off making my own as per a raw food recipe book. If I recall correctly it was 80% muscle meat, 10% organ meat and 10% meaty bones (raw chicken wings mainly), with added kelp, brewers yeast, probiotics and garlic. Nope, I have remembered wrong. There were veg too. But I can't recall the% of that. Sorry - but there are lots of articles and books available nowadays.

    After a few years I found some websites that sell it pre made. Delivered to your door still frozen, with the bone part ground up and mixed in. This was better for Toed (the cat) because his teeth weren't great by then and he struggled with the chicken wings. Raw bones (not cooked) are vital in a raw diet because it gives them firm poos.

    We still use the same brands now - Natural Instinct dot com and Wolf Tucker dot com, but now we are feeding two v healthy and enthusiastic dogs instead of cats :)

    Edited for sense!
     
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    #15 Brunneria, May 17, 2017 at 2:06 PM
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  16. SimonCrox

    SimonCrox · Well-Known Member

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    An interesting topic and thanks for the israeli reference.
    Insulin resistance has been linked to development of cognitive impairement in FInland and in Denmark:-

    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2017/04/03/dc16-2001

    http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2017/04/04/db16-1444

    So far as I can see, the risk of a diabetic person for getting dementia is increased by uncontrolled hypertension (Norwegian data) and by hypos needing hospital attendance eg the Whitmer paper.

    The role of obesity leading to future dementia seems confirmed in many but not all studies.

    As above, there is possibly less risk of dementia if one exercises, and this would be reduicing insulin resistance.

    best wishes
     
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