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Plan 'B' for pump issues?

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by Shiba Park, May 27, 2018.

  1. Shiba Park

    Shiba Park Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi All,

    I'm new to pumping and generally finding it very liberating, but how should I equip myself for when things go wrong? I appreciate that having no basal in my system means that any insulin delivery problems can get serious quite quickly, so what do people typically carry with them? Replacement canulas/infusion sets, inserters and spare batteries are a given, but what about pens etc? Ketone monitor? Basically I'm looking for people's views on a sensible balance between bulk/weight and safety...

    Thanks for any and all views!

    Shiba.
     
  2. dancer

    dancer Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    When away from home for over an hour, I take my emergency kit with me. This contains cannula, reservoir, batteries, Fiasp pen, needles, test kit and hypo treatment. I have never needed the reservoir but have needed cannulas and batteries.
     
  3. iHs

    iHs · Well-Known Member

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    If I was working, then I would leave a spare set with tube plus cartridge in my desk drawer or locker. I would also try to store a vialof iinsulin in a fridge if possible and then it wouldn't really matter how long the vial was in the fridge for because it would only be taken out to drawer up a cartridge of insulin for the pump if need be.
    I always carry a small amount of bolus insulin in a pen and just refill the glass cartridge with about 25u of bolus per month and use that when things go wrong. After 8yrs of having a pump, I haven't had a infection or had a problem that I wasn't able to take care of in a common sense way.
     
  4. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

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    whenever i leave the house i always carry a spare pod ( omnipod ) , a vial of insulin , bolus and basal pens , spare needles , lancets , sweets., and test strips

    if going away overnight add to that a spare BG meter..............
     
  5. Angusc

    Angusc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    if out of house I always carry 2 bm meters+ a spare of a totally different make which does ketones, spare batteries 2 types of lancets
     
  6. fairylights

    fairylights Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My daily kit has insulin vial, mio, reservoir, pump clip, and battery. Also syringes which saves me carrying pens around. I have two monitors anyway as I have libre (with blood and ketones strips also) and contour next. If going away overnight or longer I take also insulin pens and needles and another contour monitor
     
  7. Engineer88

    Engineer88 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'f I'm within an hour or so of home I take the minimum with me (BG meter and hypo stuff). I have a spare battery and kit in the work draw consisting of cannula and I always change at around 100u of insulin so risk of running out is super low. My grab bag for overnight has cannulas and syringes as well as glucagon (which I can also use for insulin) as does my work rucksack. If im away a few days I'll take a spare CGM sensor.
     
  8. Kim Possible

    Kim Possible Type 1 · Expert

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    I am definitely more aligned with @Engineer88 and leave the kitchen sink behind.

    However, the true answer is "it depends".
    - if I am out for less than an hour and don't intend to eat, I take hypo treatment.
    - if I am away for up to a day, I take with me my hypo treatment, BG testing kit, a spare pump battery and a syringe. My plan is to use the syringe to extract insulin from the pump cartridge and inject basal every hour if my pump fails.
    - if I have changed my set less than 2 hours before I leave, I will also add a spare cannula.
    - if I am away overnight, I will add a complete pump alternative set - this is either pens (and insulin cartridges and needles ... I forgot the needles in the past) or a loaner pump.

    I have a strong dislike of overpacking and, before I had diabetes, I would grab my house keys and run out the door so still dislike carrying a handbag everywhere I go.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. Engineer88

    Engineer88 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I cannot face taking a bag everywhere much to my mothers dismay. Its amazing what you can fit in jean pockets.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Ann48

    Ann48 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  11. Ann48

    Ann48 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Helen, my DN has suggested that if I purchase syringes on line, it would save me having to carry back up pen in case of pump failure. Therefore saving having to keep throwing insulin cartridges away after 1 month. Can you advise which syringes you use. I'm on the Medtronic 640g and use the quick sets.
     
  12. Kim Possible

    Kim Possible Type 1 · Expert

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    My syringes are pretty generic.
    They are provided on prescription ... if your DN is recommending them, I am surprised you have to pay for them (unless you are not in the UK).
    My prescription describes them as
    BD Micro-Fine + hypodermic U100 insulin syringe sterile single use / single patient use 0.3ml with 8mm needle 0.3mm/30gauge (Becton, Dickinson UK Ltd)

    They look something like these: https://www.premierhh.co.uk/bd-micro-fine-0-3ml-insulin-syringe-with-30g-8mm-needle-100.html
     
  13. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If I'm out on normal activities close to home shopping etc I frequently don't take anything (I have CGM). at worst case 30 min and I will be back home. I never take a battery unless it's getting close to flat, at worst case I will buy some, if it dies unexpectedly. If I'm going away for a day or more, especially in remote areas, then I will take 2 meters a pack of batteries, insulin and pump consumables x 3 or more, hypo stuff.
     
  14. Ann48

    Ann48 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  15. Ann48

    Ann48 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your reply, I'm in the UK, my DN started by saying I could ask to have them added to my prescription, then suggested I buy them as they appear inexpensive. I couldn't remember the exact description of them,I think they are the ins you have mentioned. I'll pursue the doctor.
     
  16. Shiba Park

    Shiba Park Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    A big thank you to all the suggestions from everyone. I have to admit that my original post was motivated by an aversion to wasting medication! Rationally I realise that makes no sense, avoiding even just a single hospital stay would pay for years of wasted insulin...

    I guess I feel more comfortable knowing that others are happy to 'waste' insulin in order to stay safe. It just offends my Scottish heritage!

    Thanks all.

    Shiba.
     
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