1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2022 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Protein powder conundrum

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by O_DP_T1, Apr 25, 2018.

  1. O_DP_T1

    O_DP_T1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    166
    Trophy Points:
    83
    @helensaramay thanks for your reply very informative. So I always take my basal in the evening around 9pm-ish, now if I reduce this on training days the 4pm rise would already have happened or am I missing a trick???
     
  2. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    Absolutely - the basal starts taking affect AFTER you have taken it so if you reduce it on training days, it will mean you have less for recovery days.
    (Sorry, for the change in terminology from "non-training days" to "recovery days". It helps me think about my body recovering from the liver dump on the training day.)
     
  3. O_DP_T1

    O_DP_T1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    166
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Forgive me if I am being thick here, but if i reduce the basal after training days I can see that helping out on 'rest days' BUT how it won't help the 4pm liver dump that's just happened, this is what I am trying to get to the bottom of.

    Again thanks in advance.
     
  4. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    That is why I suggested you may want to increase your basal for your training days (increase it at 9pm the day before).
    If this would result in night time hypos, my only other suggestion would be to do a correction bolus at 4pm - you know approximately when it happens and, I assume the level is consistent, so you may even be able to proactively bolus 30 minutes prior.

    Long acting insulin which is used as basal on MDI, assumes our body needs a constant level of insulin all day.
    Unfortunately, this is rarely the case: for example, many people need more in the morning to manage dawn phenomenon and it is common to need more when doing cardio exercise and less when doing resistance training. Through injections, we have little scope to change the basal levels on less than a daily basis.
    This is where an insulin pump becomes valuable. A pump works by dripping fast acting insulin at all times of the day as the basal. Therefore, we can adjust the rate of basal at different times or temporarily when you do exercise.
     
  5. O_DP_T1

    O_DP_T1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    166
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Aaaaah got it ok. So tomrrow is a heavy training day sooooo I'm thinking increase the Levimer tonight by 2units hope for the best overnight and then see what happens post workout tomorrow at 4pm-ish!!!!!
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook