1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Scary meter readings

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Confucius, Jan 16, 2017.

  1. Confucius

    Confucius Prediabetes · Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Hello all. I was not diagnosed as having diabetes (the long story is here: http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/hello-from-china-and-my-short-story.114713/) but from the test result, I believe I am at least prediabetic and bought a meter to monitor my BS levels so as to know what not to eat or eat much.

    The first day (yesterday) went fine with readings ranging in satisfactory levels (4.4-6.2 mmol/L) but it spiked to 7.5 mmol/L two hours after today's lunch (I ate similar foods and amounts as in the morning and last night). Then I started a 30-minute exercise and tested again, it read 3.1 mmol/L which is in the range of low blood sugar. I knew it couldn't be as I still felt energetic and strong. One hour later, I tested my sugar again and it read 4.7 mmol/L. Now I really suspect the accuracy of these readings. There are reports on my brand that some of its models could be 30% less than the real reading.

    I'm really puzzled and frustrated. I'm quite new about this and wonder how you, if you test your BS yourself using a meter, make sure the readings are accurate and reliable? There are also some articles saying all meters on the market are not accurate with 15%+ deviation and even hospital readings could be +/-4%.

    It is really scary if we rely on these meters, isn't it? Again, I am new and still learning. I hope you could share your experience and insights on this.

    Thanks.
     
  2. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,748
    Likes Received:
    5,107
    Trophy Points:
    178
    It is best not to rely on any one particular reading, but to gather data over a few weeks, and look for the trends. I find that my reading can change when I open a new pot of strips, again I just look to see where my readings are trending, but then I am full on Diabetic, and can only keep my post meal numbers down if I almost totally exclude carbs
     
  3. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    9,664
    Likes Received:
    15,726
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Confucious - As walnut_face suggests you are focusing to keenly on each and every reading your see.

    In your shoes, I would live normally (no changes to diet or exercise routines) but test my bloods, for a couple of weeks to get a handle on what my "normal state" actually is. Alongside the finger prick testing, I would keep a food diary of what I ate and drank, and when, so that I could match the numbers and foods up. The lab bloods you had done at the hospital suggest no cause for concern - this tactic would likely back that up. If it didn't, at least you would have ideas where the issues lie.

    "Normal" people, without diabetes also have variable blood readings if the do finger prick testing, but for obvious reasons, not many do test. It is my further belief that they have the sorts of lows you saw on your meter, especially when either hungry or after certain types of exercise.

    When a person with a working hormone/digestive system goes a bit low on the blood numbers, their liver releases a bit of glucose to bring the numbers back into a more comfortable zone. That could well have been what you saw when you did your 3.1 test, followed by a 4.7 an hour later.

    To be honest, I would urge you not to have decided you have a medical condition before you have adequate information (information, not symptoms or feelings).

    Anyone can see a rogue reading on their meter. It happens if finger tips, strips are contaminated. If you see a number you really cannot get your head around (either very high or very low), it's best to wash and dry your hands and redo the test.

    You really do need to build up data or there is an acute danger you will send yourself into a stressful tailspin.
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  4. Confucius

    Confucius Prediabetes · Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    23
    @AndBreathe @walnut_face Yes, indeed maybe I'm too obsessed with all these testings and blood sugar readings and it seems to send me into a vicious cycle of believing my 'illness' is developing fast and in an uncontrollable state. I will take your advice and calm down and observe to collect data and see how patterns develop. Thank you for your kind words and insights.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook