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Type 1 Shielding for diabetics

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by jane1950, May 25, 2020.

  1. Jamie H

    Jamie H · Well-Known Member

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    If solely relying on the data then I don't see it being a one size fits all approach with regard to shielding... I don't think scientists are suggested that either.. Although it keeps being quoted in this thread?

    In saying that the paper for under 40s doesn't eliminate risk.. It just says its quite low and not significantly higher than a non-diabetic under 40... Nothing will eliminate it completely and there are still perfectly fit and healthy under 40s diabetic or not being made severely ill by covid... Received a text message in our football club WhatsApp from a member who is under 30 with no underlying health conditions. He's just been taken off a ventilator after 3 weeks. No need for complacency to set in in certain age groups due to the research/paper but at the same time everyday decisions need to be taken based on the science.
     
  2. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    We can look at so much data regarding COVID-19, but at the end of the day, the virus doesn't cherry pick certain people, either with or without health conditions, so luck does seem to come into it. for a huge % of people they are still going strong, but a 43 year old male died, he was my neighbours nephew:(
    Thankfully, I am doing ok, I am not over anxious or worried and doing the best I can to stay fit and healthy :)
     
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  3. frankb58

    frankb58 · Newbie

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    I am T1 (49 yrs) I've have a heart attack 10 yrs ago, two mild TIA's in the last 5 yrs and still had to work as my employer deemed my work as essential and would only get SSP if I had self isolated. I have never received any letters or advice from my GP. My diabetes is well controlled ( ok it's not bad ) but have just been left to sort it out myself.
     
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  4. Jamie H

    Jamie H · Well-Known Member

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    Yea you're right and we can talk abstractly to a point then stories really hit home, such as your neighbour's nephew. All we can do is try to stay as fit and healthy as possible. Even with the data and trying to figure out associated risk.. as you say unfortunately luck will always play its part.
     
  5. Jamie H

    Jamie H · Well-Known Member

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    Yea this doesn't seem right. Hopefully the new data can help change your employers mind! Hope you get sorted OK
     
  6. jennyrogers1983

    jennyrogers1983 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Considering I’ve not had a diabetic check up in nearly 2 years due to them being so behind I’ve no clue what my hb1ac is and how well controlled I am, can only go on my daily figures!
     
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  7. Book_woorm

    Book_woorm Type 1 · Member

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    Trouble is that we only have the broad ratios and nobody has the ability to put numbers to aspects of the problem. How much is the difference in risk between Type1 and type 2 when there are no underlying health problems. Has anybody quantified the impact of other health conditions. Does a heart condition carry a greater risk than say Chron's Disease. As a fit 71 year old with closely controlled type 1 living on Dartmoor. I don't believe that I'm particularly at risk but I'm not able to apportion the relative risks The risk is obviously higher if I go and spend a day in the city but by how much? but if I take the car to the automatic carwash and just sit inside while the machine does its job then I cant believe that the risk is any greater than sitting in the garden.
    Has anybody got the numbers?
     
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  8. JRT

    JRT · Well-Known Member

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    I think the range of age/ health etc of diabetics would make it difficult to have a blanket rule. I'm type 2,sugar levels out of range gp wants etc. I'm also closer to 60 and 50 and work in a care home and need to use public transport to get there. A slim well controlled gardener/ window cleaner who much younger may view things differently. I think the scary thing is they are learning new things all the time about how this virus works. This week research indicated that individuals with dementia were vulnerable genetically rather than age/ environment alone. I have not been at work since mid march, in retrospect I'm glad as the infection has been rife with catastrophic consequences. In early April my GP felt it highly inadvisable for me to work but I didnt tick any official boxes. Initially she was quite offhand,I'm working why cant you? Then she listened and calmed down! Work have supported me in that im not there but they are not paying me.! Negotiations are ongoing but they have admitted I cant do my job and social distance and are hoping to furlough me which would be easier if shielded. Thankfully on this sight today I found a link to Gov.UK where the advise for vulnerable but not shielded groups has subtly changed. Now we should stay indoors as much as possible and avoid contact with others outside of our household as much as possible. I'm hoping this is going to be as helpful as it sounds when I contact my GP tomorrow. One thing I have learned from this site is how varied and unpredictable GPs and employers can be with some saying isolate and furlough without a blink and others,well.
    I think the risk is very real but varies between individuals vastly. We are also at the very beginning of understanding the virus and being cautious is not a bad thing ,even if half the country is chomping at the bit to go down pub and get on a plane. Listen carefully the government understandably need to ease us out of lockdown,but after the bluster they openly say the virus is still there and a threat,more so if vulnerable
     
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  9. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Even if foreign holidays were given away, I wouldn't get on a plane. All that recycled dirty air. It has always been known most flyers often catch colds and coughs after flying for a few hours. All it takes is one person on that plane to have the virus and Bingo. The rest get it.
     
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  10. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Nobody knows what the exact risk is to an individual, I don't think it would help much if they did. As far as reducing risk is concerned, living on Dartmoor must be a definite advantage, apart from the Grimpen Mire of course.
     
  11. RAPS_od

    RAPS_od Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm a T1 here in the States and I feel as if I may never go out again. So many here completely disregard social distancing and wearing masks that until there's a vaccine, going out is like playing Russian roulette. If only our leadership had, well, leadership, we might not be in this bind.
     
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  12. Debi69

    Debi69 · Newbie

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    I asked my doctor if it was possible for me to be shielded but was told no. I'm type 1 diabetic and have hi white blood cell count plus athsma. I've had a few wks off with chest infection and sore throat so it must depend on the doctor x
     
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  13. Dianemacfaden

    Dianemacfaden Type 1 · Active Member

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  14. Dianemacfaden

    Dianemacfaden Type 1 · Active Member

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    I think the guidance has been a bit vague. I have had type1 for nearly 50 years and have good hba1c results and am not overweight. I have been happy at home and do not work and my husband has been doing the shopping but I have been to my local,garden centre and survived. Surely I am safe to venture out a bit further as long as I am careful?
     
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  15. maureenlilian

    maureenlilian Type 2 · Newbie

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    I have not been told to shield by my GP or my diabetic doctor either. I am over 75 and my levels have been very high over the last few months. Although my hba1c test showed 6.4 and the diabetes doctor was pleased with this. I really don’t know what I’m supposed to do although I have only left the house twice since kick down to have blood tests.
     
  16. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That is a bit of a shocker! You can get an hba1c and standard lipid panel plus check of kidney function done via your surgery so you could speak to your GP to arrange this. Hopefully this will tally with your daily numbers anyway. Just saying as I know how conjected diabetes clinics will be post virus.
     
  17. andyh19

    andyh19 · Newbie

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    Think I will have to assess the risk factors myself for return to work and discuss with employer and medical professionals .
    Where I live low incidence of Covid19 wher I work high incidence of Covid19.
     
  18. keelygeorgiou

    keelygeorgiou Type 1 · Newbie

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    My GP has said I am not eligible for a shielding letter. I am a 46 year old type 1 diabetic who teaches in a secondary school. Has anyone else been refused a letter from their doctor? Any advice?
     
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    #58 keelygeorgiou, May 29, 2020 at 11:40 AM
    Last edited: May 29, 2020
  19. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Did your GP give you a reason? Do you have any complications or other illnesses, are you on medication other than for your diabetes? What was your last HbA1c and are you well controlled?
     
  20. Picci

    Picci Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I’ve been refused.
    I’m type 1, 51years old, high Bp, under active thyroid, and I work in a middle school.
     
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