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T2 - Lower Breakfast sugar levels

Discussion in 'Diabetes News' started by HpprKM, Dec 16, 2010.

  1. HpprKM

    HpprKM · Well-Known Member

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  2. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    Couldn't you just eat some high protein with the breakfast. Wouldn't the result be the same?
     
  3. hallii

    hallii · Well-Known Member

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    Blimey the breakfast they used was 51g of carbs, that would send me high for the day!

    It might be far better to have say 10g of carb in a high protein breakfast, egg and bacon, omelete, cheese omelete, etc.,

    H
     
  4. Cowboyjim

    Cowboyjim · Well-Known Member

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    We can all do this... scoff the stuff measuring the BG before and after... it's hardly rocket science. :wink: 8)
     
  5. Cowboyjim

    Cowboyjim · Well-Known Member

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    It could simply be something to do with a reduction in the concentration of the carbs.
    I have often pondered on this one. I eat nuts when I have a small piece of high coco choc and feel no adverse effects.
    I suppose everyone's digestive system works slightly differently but there must be ground rules.
    How does the body tackle the food in our stomachs? Does it deal with some things quicker? I presume the high carb sugary stuff gets dealt with very rapidly when it's on its own. Like when you eat a sugar cube. If you were to eat the same sugar cube ground up and dispersed in some less easily digested foodstuff surely it would not trigger the same spike in blood sugar?
     
  6. robertconroy

    robertconroy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It's not a mystery. Protien causes an insulin response even though there are no carbs involved. So an early morning protien starts the insulin pumping and then later hit it with some carbs. = less effect from the carbs + the protien counteracts the blood spiking of the breakfast carbs somewhat. I've found a low carb yogurt that is great for this, it's only 4 grams carbs for the whole container and has whey protien. I've also found a low carb bread made by a local bread company - it's only 1 net carb per slice and had 12 grams of protien and 12 grams of fiber, and it low sodium too. A diabetics dream... It tasts great once you get used to the lower sodium. :D
     
  7. Cowboyjim

    Cowboyjim · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to be slow but I didn't understand a word of that.
    Please do not tease us with useful products without identifying them.
    Cheers 8)
     
  8. AlcalaBob

    AlcalaBob Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What is interesting in this research is not so much that a low-carb pre-meal reduces the impact of later carb loading, but that the low carb pre-meal itself seems to reduce plasma free fatty acids. That suggests a potentially interesting mechanism for why consistently low-carb diets can help restore insulin sensitivity. It's not a recommendation for a diet plan.

    The danger of this sort of report is that it can persuade people that they can carry on eating high carb breakfasts provided they preface it with a low-carb pre-meal. That's really silly thinking because the high carb breakfast that follows is still putting glucose into the body - it will still be metabolised.

    The simple rule is that if it goes down your neck, it counts. You can't cancel out glucose. Carbohydrates get broken down to glucose so if you swallow it, you are producing glucose regardless of what else you might have eaten. There's no such thing as a free carb hit.

    Reports that certain combinations of foods cancel out the carbohydrate effect are quite misleading. Even if biochemically, an effect such as reducing intestinal absorption of glucose is demonstrated, the scale of the effect is all important - detection of the effect on a micro level is no recommendation at all. All kinds of berries and juices are sold with this marketing ploy. We should be very very skeptical about these claims.
     
  9. dib

    dib · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, could you reveal who that bread company is? PM me if its against forum rules. Thanks
     
  10. Cowboyjim

    Cowboyjim · Well-Known Member

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    AlcalaBob - great post but depressingly realistic. Thanks.

    But I was under the impression that this is what the NHS recommend with their 'plate' approach.

    All comes down to the individual. You want to eat that carby stuff go ahead. Measure your BG and adjust accordingly.

    No one still explains my notional idea of relative rates of metabolic activity. Which foods does it tackle in preference? Not unlikely that sugar-base stuff first to give you energy to run or fight etc. Reactions run at different rates in any system.

    If you homogenised carbs with non-carbs and compacted it then ate it would it have the same effect as if the constituents were eaten sequentially?

    Food for thought! 8)
     
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