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T2; strange morning reading

Discussion in 'Blood Glucose Monitoring' started by WheelyFun, Apr 13, 2018.

  1. WheelyFun

    WheelyFun Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi all,

    Firstly thank you for all of your help with the other issue for that friend of mine.


    Anyway, last night, I had a reading of 5.3 before bed, and didn’t think anything of it, except that I had half expected a hypo over the course of the night, but I didn’t wake up feeling unwell, so thought when I woke up this morning that I’d be somewhere around the same.

    However I have just tested myself again, and it is at 8.7, so my question is, what is likely to have happened?

    I woke up three times overnight, to urinate, which normally only happens with that frequency if I am having high sugar levels. But didn’t feel unwell at any point. I drank one glass of water at around 4am.

    Is this something your body can do when you are asleep to push your sugars back up to stop you from having a hypo?

    My sugars have generally been trending downward recently, but that is because I have been under better control of my sugars than I normally am.
     
  2. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    If your BG gets very very low - to the level your brain is starved of the glucose it needs - your body will react by releasing glucose from your liver.
    I am not aware of it reacting to avoid this happening.

    There are multiple things that could have happened. For example,
    - you at something last night which was slow to turn into glucose so although you went to bed at 5.3, your body was still working at digesting it
    - you are starting to suffer from some illness. This could include fighting off something which you have not noticed the symptoms for. If you monitoring throughout today you may see an continuous high
    - the high BG was a liver dump or dawn phenomenon. This is very very common - everyone's body will release glucose to give them energy to start the day. If your pancreas works properly, it will release enough insulin to convert to energy. However, with diabetes, we don't react so well and see a high BG. You do not mention whether your morning high is common or not.

    The only way of knowing what happened is to monitor your BG throughout the night. If you are lucky enough to have a Libre, this is ideal. Alternatively, you could take a reading every time you wake up. This is what I do because most of the time when I wake in the middle of the night it is related to a high or low BG.
     
  3. britishpub

    britishpub Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As a Type 2, why did you half expect a Hypo during the night?

    In the 3 years since I was diagnosed I have neither had a hypo nor ever expected one, and I regularly get readings of 3.7 or sometimes lower.
     
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